Connect with us

Santé Et Nutrition

Cecilia Chiang Turns 90: The Woman Who Inspired Decades of Chinese-American Restaurateurs

admin

Published

on


Two days before her 99th birthday, Cecilia Chiang is holding court with a dozen or so friends and family members at a long blond wooden table. Everyone is gathered for dinner at the Greenwich Village outpost of the fast-casual bing and noodle joint, Junzi Kitchen. The space is minimalist and plant-filled, the lighting is a little harsh, and the table is outlined by young customers wearing Adidas sneakers and white baseball caps who keep strolling in to pick up take-out orders, unaware they’re in the presence of restaurant royalty.

The setting feels appropriate for Chiang’s birthday party in a way. Without her, Junzi Kitchen—launched in 2015 by a couple of Yale students—likely would not exist. In fact, any of your favorite regional Chinese restaurants owe their presence at least partially to Chiang. Her San Francisco restaurant, The Mandarin, opened in 1961 amid a sea of stereotypical, chop suey–slinging spots and forever changed the makeup of Chinese restaurants in the U.S.

At 99 (technically 98, since the party is happening just before her birthday), Chiang certainly does not look her age, or like someone who spent multiple decades in the rough-and-tumble of the restaurant industry. Dressed in a striped black shirt and tailored black pants, her short hair neatly combed back, and large lustrous pearls dangling from her neck and ears (plus two dazzling rings on her fingers), she is a vision of poise. She walks delicately but purposefully, talks slowly but eloquently, and has a jubilant, full-bellied laugh.

If you’ve read anything on Cecilia Chiang, you’re probably familiar with her legendary origin story: how she escaped the Japanese invasion of China in 1942 and walked six months to a relative’s place in Chongqing, then fled China for Japan during the communist revolution, went to visit her widowed sister in San Francisco in 1960, tried to lend some money to two friends for a restaurant while there, and then was forced to take over the lease and move to the Bay Area permanently after the friends backed out and the landlord refused to return her money. She would reluctantly turn that tiny space into The Mandarin—a beautiful banquet-style restaurant serving the sophisticated Mandarin and Sichuan food (beggar’s chicken, smoked tea duck) from her upbringing with excellent service, a far cry from the homogeneous spots that suffused Chinatown. “I wanted high-end,” she says. “When I looked at Chinatown, I was really embarrassed. It was mostly chop suey and dragons and gold—so gaudy. And no tablecloths, no service, no carpets.” The Mandarin was an impeccably designed space, with bamboo, perfectly ironed white tablecloths, and elegant-looking artwork hanging from the walls.

cecilia chiang 3

Photo by Heather Sten

The restaurant industry was especially tough back in the ’60s for a woman, she says, especially a Chinese one. “People were very rude to me,” she says. “They gave me a hard time because I didn’t speak the language; because I was a woman, I had to pay cash every time.” People thought Chinese restaurants were “greasy and dirty,” she says, so distributors were hesitant to work with her. Even more isolating was the fact that because of her education and upbringing, she spoke a different dialect and didn’t dress like most other Chinese restaurateurs in the area, making it hard to find a community.

But thanks to the ingenuity of The Mandarin and Chiang’s bubbly demeanor, community soon found her. The restaurant earned a fan base that included heavy hitters like James Beard (“So tall and…,” she puffs up her cheeks to indicate Beard’s largesse), Williams-Sonoma founder Chuck Williams, and Julia Child. One day a young chef named Alice Waters walked into the restaurant, adored the food, and convinced Chiang to launch cooking classes, where Waters, Child, and Jeremiah Tower all came to learn about Chinese cuisine early in their careers.

That was Chiang’s first taste of mentorship, something that would become a central theme of her career, for both chefs like Waters and young Chinese-American restaurateurs who sought to follow in her footsteps.

cecilia chiang 4

Photo by Heather Sten

One of Chiang’s early mentees was her son, Philip, who, inspired by The Mandarin’s success, co-founded P.F. Chang’s, a destination for more casual, affordable Chinese cuisine in 1993. Later on she helped pastry chef Belinda Leong with her celebrated San Francisco bakery, B. Patisserie, and then eventually Ming Bai, Yong Zhao, and Wanting Zhang, who, with Junzi Kitchen, envisioned bringing unfussy, regional Chinese cuisine to the fast-casual realm.

At the start of dinner, the 25-year-old Junzi Kitchen chef, Lucas Sin, nervously tells Chiang how he consulted his own mother about what to cook for her that night, and then a parade of dishes arrives: tomatoes glazed in pat chun vinegar with shiso and watercress; smashed cucumbers with sesame and red amaranth; chun bing, skinny pancakes served with sides of chili-spiked beef shank, braised pork hock, garlic chives, and soy-scrambled eggs and leeks; and a comforting noodle soup of tomatoes and scrambled eggs. It’s simple food, more Chinese home cooking than Chinese banquet, and Chiang absolutely loves it.

She lifts up a few of the garlic chives with her chopsticks. “See?” she points. “Simple food, little oil, no MSG.” She opens up the basket of chun bing, and gingerly picks one up. “This one has texture, it is hand-rolled,” she says of the soft, bouncy crepe. “This is very good.”

She discusses a few of the restaurants she has visited on her trip to New York: the Park Slope trattoria, Al Di La, which she enjoyed; the Jean-Georges restaurant, JoJo, where she found the decor very tasteful; and Eleven Madison Park where “the food is good,” she says of the hallowed restaurant, “but I think people exaggerate too much.” Apparently, as soon as she walked in, one of the chefs saw her and gestured to the entire staff to come meet her. “That was kind of exciting,” she admits.

Chinese-American restaurateurs have it a lot easier now, she says. “They are well-educated,” so it is easier for them to navigate the industry; they understand the importance of investing in good design, quality ingredients, and smart team members. She shows off her hands, which are quite wrinkled and crooked from arthritis—badges of honor, she says, from all the cooking, scrubbing, and dishwashing she did by herself for years.

What hasn’t changed, though, she adds, is the issue of harassment. She has been following the #MeToo movement’s impact on the industry, and asserts that when she was growing up in China, “this happened all the time in show business, but Chinese ladies didn’t say anything,” she says. “It is good that women are speaking out now.” She remembers being a younger woman trying to go to the bathroom and being grabbed by a man from behind. “They really are a bunch of monsters!” she says, recounting a few of the men who have been brought down by harassment allegations. She shakes her head in dismay.

As she continues to taste the various dishes at her birthday dinner, her famously sharp palate is still as on point as ever. She can identify the exact herbs in the tomato salad, and the ingredients in the noodle broth. She inspects the julienned pieces of ginger for uniformity. She breezily sips her Chenin Blanc and leans across the table to toast with her friends. “People always say, ‘You probably don’t eat much,’” she says. “But I tell them that I eat three meals a day regularly. Also, I drink! I have Champagne, and I enjoy it!”

As the party begins to wind down and the last course comes out (a bowl of red fruits, to symbolize prosperity), Chiang, unprompted, tells everyone that she is a Buddhist and therefore she is frequently asked whether she believes in a second life (she does). So, someone asks: What would she want to be in her next existence?

She pauses for a brief but weighty moment, as if to reflect on the 99-year scope of her life, and then laughs.

She loves people, and she revels in hard work, so the answer seems obvious to her: “I think I would still like to be in the restaurant business.”



Source link

قالب وردپرس

Santé Et Nutrition

Nouveaux projets pour le Club de ski de fond de Sept-Îles

admin

Published

on

By

En ce début de nouvelle saison, le Club de ski de fond Rapido de Sept-Îles travaille sur un projet de bâtiment d’accueil permanent qui servirait à l’ensemble de la base de plein air du Lac des Rapides. En attendant, les membres du club se réjouissent de l’acquisition d’une nouvelle dameuse.

C’était journée porte ouverte samedi au club de ski. Pour célébrer cette nouvelle saison de glisse, le président du Club de ski de fond Rapido a présenté aux membres la nouvelle dameuse qui permettra d’entretenir les différents sentiers.

La nouvelle dameuse du Club de ski de fond Rapido de Sept-Îles

Photo : Radio-Canada / Alix-Anne Turcotti

C’est quand même une valeur de 350 000 $. Pour un club de notre envergure, c’est un gros investissement, et ça a été rendu possible grâce à la participation de Développement économique Canada dans une proportion importante de 60 % et d’autres partenaires, explique le président du Club de ski de fond Rapido, Gaétan Talbot.

Ce nouvel équipement acquis, les membres du club poursuivent leur sensibilisation auprès de la Ville de Sept-Îles pour la création d’un nouvel édifice d’accueil au Lac des rapides. Gaétan Talbot souhaiterait que le bâtiment serve été comme hiver pour toutes les activités récréatives de l’endroit.

Depuis quelques années, le club de ski de fond accueille les skieurs dans une roulotte aménagée à cet effet : une solution considérée comme temporaire par les responsables.

Les bâtiments d’accueil du Club de ski de fond Rapido à Sept-Îles

Photo : Courtoisie : Club de ski de fond Rapido

Il y a des embûches actuellement qui font que le projet est retardé, par exemple, l’accès à l’eau potable. Curieusement, on est à côté de la source d’eau potable et on a de la difficulté à aller chercher dans la nappe phréatique. Le président du club espère que ces difficultés seront bientôt surmontées. Il s’agira par la suite de trouver le financement à ce projet, ajoute-t-il.

Nouveauté

Cette année, l’accès aux différents sentiers de ski de fond et la location d’équipement sont gratuits pour les enfants de moins de 12 ans.

C’est aussi bien pour les jeunes de l’école que pour les jeunes qui viennent avec leurs parents, précise la vice-présidente de l’école de ski, Manon Otis.

Cette année, le Club de ski de fond Rapido compte 212 membres.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Une boisson frappée végétalienne pour tous les amateurs de desserts

admin

Published

on

By

(EN) Compte tenu des changements apportés au Guide alimentaire canadien qui recommande de consommer davantage d’aliments à base de plantes, il est maintenant temps d’essayer de nouvelles recettes. Cette boisson frappée végétalienne composée de produits végétaux constitue la parfaite petite gourmandise pour vos réceptions en plein air cet été.

S’inspirant de la pêche Melba, cette boisson frappée est à base de noix de coco, donc sans produits laitiers, tandis que la mangue surgelée remplace à la perfection le populaire fruit à noyau. Résultat : une jolie couleur pêche alléchante qui complète les nuances exotiques de cette boisson onctueuse bien fraîche et désaltérante.

« Végétal n’est pas forcément synonyme de fade », dit Martin Patenaude, Chef pour les Écoles culinaires PC. Il ajoute que cette boisson frappée tendance est une gourmandise estivale qui fera fureur auprès de vos invités.

Boisson frappée Melba à la mangue

Temps de préparation : 10 minutes
Prêt en : 10 minutes
Portions : 2

Ingrédients 

  • 250 ml (1 tasse) de morceaux de mangues surgelés
  • 250 ml (1 tasse) de Substitut de yogourt probiotique sans produits laitiers au lait de coco de culture saveur vanille PC, divisé
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de jus d’orange fraîchement pressée, divisé
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de dessert végétal surgelé à la mangue et au lait de coco, divisé
  • 250 ml (1 tasse) de framboises rouges entières surgelées
  • 4 framboises fraîches, pour la garniture

Méthode 

  1. Mélanger la mangue, 125 ml (½ tasse) de substitut de yogourt, 45 ml (3 c. à soupe) de jus d’orange et 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) de dessert surgelé dans le mélangeur; mixer jusqu’à obtention d’une texture lisse et onctueuse, en ajoutant 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) d’eau ou du jus d’orange au besoin pour obtenir la consistance souhaitée. Verser le mélange dans deux grands verres de 250 ml (1 tasse), en le répartissant de manière égale.
  2. Astuce : Utilisez une passoire à tamis fin pour éliminer la pulpe du jus d’orange avant de le verser dans le mélangeur.
  3. Mélanger les framboises surgelées, les 125 ml (½ tasse) de substitut de yogourt et les 45 ml (3 c. à soupe) de jus d’orange restants dans le même mélangeur; mixer jusqu’à obtention d’une texture lisse et onctueuse. Verser la préparation sur le mélange à la mangue, en la répartissant uniformément. Remuer pour créer un effet ombré.
  4. Garnir chaque boisson frappée avec les 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) de dessert surgelé restants. Garnir de framboises fraîches, en les répartissant uniformément.

Information nutritionnelle par portion : 260 calories, 5 g de lipides (dont 3,5 g de gras saturés), 25 mg de sodium, 53 g de glucides, 1 g de fibres, 37 g de sucres et 3 g de protéines.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Cet été, ajoutez de la saveur à vos pâtes

admin

Published

on

By

(EN) Mayonnaise et macaroni, écartez-vous! Les tomates séchées au soleil et la bette à carde de saison mettent l’été à l’honneur dans cette salade de pâtes améliorée composée de délicats girasoli, une pâte farcie qui doit son nom à sa forme de tournesol. Pour changer du basilic, ce pesto est une excellente façon de savourer la bette à carde : un peu de parmesan au goût prononcé, des pignons de pin et un soupçon de citron acidulé atténuent l’amertume de ce légume vert à feuilles.

Vous voulez changer le profil de saveur? Michelle Pennock, cheffe cuisinière de la cuisine-laboratoire PC,vous donne cette astuce pour cuisiner ce plat très coloré :. « Remplacez les pignons de pin par des noix ou des amandes grillées hachées, si vous le souhaitez. »

Salade de pâtes aux tomates séchées au soleil avec pesto de bette à carde

Temps de préparation : 15 minutes
Temps de cuisson : 4 minutes
Temps de refroidissement : 15 minutes
Prêt en : 35 minutes
Portions : 6

Ingrédients

  • Demi-botte de bette à carde (en séparant les feuilles et les tiges)
  • 600 g (1 emb.) de Pâtes Girasole mozzarella et tomates séchées au soleil PC SplendidoMD (pâtes aux œufs farcies italiennes traditionnelles)
  • 150 ml (2/3 tasse) d’huile d’olive extra-vierge
  • 2 gousses d’ail, finement hachées
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de pignons de pin, grillés
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de fromage parmigiano reggiano affiné à pâte dure vieilli 24 mois, râpé
  • 15 ml (1 c. à soupe) de jus de citron fraîchement pressé
  • 2 ml (½ c. à thé) de sel
  • 1 ml (¼ c. à thé) de poivre noir
  • 25 ml (2 c. à soupe) de tomates séchées au soleil hachées dans de l’huile assaisonnée

Méthode 

  1. Hacher grossièrement les feuilles de bette à carde. Réserver. Trancher finement les tiges de bette à carde.
  2. Faire bouillir 2 L (8 tasses) d’eau légèrement salée dans une grande casserole. Ajouter les pâtes et les tiges de bette à carde; faire cuire de 3 à 4 minutes, en remuant de temps en temps et en réduisant le feu au besoin pour maintenir une légère ébullition. Égoutter. Étaler les pâtes en une seule couche sur une plaque de cuisson tapissée de papier sulfurisé. Verser un filet de 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) d’huile. Laisser entièrement refroidir pendant 15 minutes environ.
  3. Pendant ce temps, mélanger ensemble l’ail et 60 ml (1/4 tasse) de pignons de pin et de fromage (chaque) dans le robot culinaire jusqu’à ce qu’ils soient finement hachés. Ajouter les feuilles de bette à carde. Avec le moteur en marche, verser graduellement en filet les 125 ml (1/2 tasse) d’huile restants jusqu’à obtention d’une texture lisse. Incorporer le jus de citron, le sel et le poivre.
  4. Mélanger les pâtes avec 125 ml (1/2 tasse) de pesto dans un grand saladier pour bien les enrober. Conserver le reste de pesto pour un autre usage. Garnir de tomates et des 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) de pignons et de fromage (chaque) restants. Servir à température ambiante.

Information nutritionnelle par portion : 460 calories, 29 g de lipides (dont 6 g de gras saturés), 780 mg de sodium, 39 g de glucides, 3 g de fibres, 8 g de sucres et 13 g de protéines.

Continue Reading

Chat

Santé Et Nutrition4 mois ago

Nouveaux projets pour le Club de ski de fond de Sept-Îles

Styles De Vie4 mois ago

100 emplois en péril au centre de contrôle du CN

Styles De Vie4 mois ago

Le Canada renforce les droits des passagers aériens

Styles De Vie4 mois ago

L’environnement fiscal est plus profitable aux entreprises au Canada qu’aux E. U.

Styles De Vie4 mois ago

Pourquoi le Canada doit-il ratifier le nouvel ALENA?

Santé Et Nutrition6 mois ago

Une boisson frappée végétalienne pour tous les amateurs de desserts

Santé Et Nutrition6 mois ago

Cet été, ajoutez de la saveur à vos pâtes

Santé Et Nutrition6 mois ago

Une nouvelle technologie donne plus de libertés aux personnes atteintes de diabète

Santé Et Nutrition6 mois ago

Une nouvelle façon de percevoir le diabète de type 1

Santé Et Nutrition6 mois ago

Comment freiner la crise des opioïdes dans les petites villes

Styles De Vie6 mois ago

Les jeunes et les opioïdes : Ce que les parents doivent savoir

Styles De Vie6 mois ago

Prenez soin de vous cet été

Styles De Vie6 mois ago

Survivre à un voyage en famille

Styles De Vie6 mois ago

Magasiner pour un véhicule en 2019

Styles De Vie6 mois ago

5 bonnes raisons de louer un bateau de plaisance

Affaires7 mois ago

Le stress financier affecte-t-il votre santé physique et mentale ?

Affaires7 mois ago

Les plans de location avec option d’achat vous conviennent-ils?

Affaires7 mois ago

Utiliser votre auto comme garantie pour un prêt : ce qu’il faut savoir

Affaires7 mois ago

Les fraudes par carte de crédit sont de plus en plus fréquentes – quoi faire si vous en êtes victime

Affaires7 mois ago

Vous achetez une maison? Attention à la fraude hypothécaire

Anglais1 année ago

Body found after downtown Lethbridge apartment building fire, police investigating – Lethbridge

Styles De Vie1 année ago

Salon du chocolat 2018: les 5 temps forts

Anglais1 année ago

27 CP Rail cars derail near Lake Louise, Alta.

Anglais1 année ago

Man facing eviction from family home on Toronto Islands gets reprieve — for now

Santé Et Nutrition1 année ago

Gluten-Free Muffins

Anglais1 année ago

This B.C. woman’s recipe is one of the most popular of all time — and the story behind it is bananas

Santé Et Nutrition1 année ago

We Try Kin Euphorics and How to REALLY Get the Glow | Healthyish

Anglais1 année ago

Ontario’s Tories hope Ryan Gosling video will keep supporters from breaking up with the party

Anglais1 année ago

A photo taken on Toronto’s Corso Italia 49 years ago became a family legend. No one saw it — until now

Anglais2 années ago

Condo developer Thomas Liu — who collected millions but hasn’t built anything — loses court fight with Town of Ajax

Styles De Vie2 années ago

Renaud Capuçon, rédacteur en chef du Figaroscope

Anglais1 année ago

This couple shares a 335-square-foot micro condo on Queen St. — and loves it

Mode1 année ago

Paris : chez Cécile Roederer co-fondatrice de Smallable

Anglais1 année ago

Ontario Tories argue Trudeau’s carbon plan is ‘unconstitutional’

Anglais1 année ago

100 years later, Montreal’s Black Watch regiment returns to Wallers, France

Anglais1 année ago

Trudeau government would reject Jason Kenney, taxpayers group in carbon tax court fight

Technologie1 année ago

YouTube recommande de la pornographie juvénile, allègue un internaute

Styles De Vie1 année ago

Ford Ranger Raptor, le pick-up roule des mécaniques

Anglais1 année ago

Province’s push for private funding, additional stops puts Scarborough subway at risk of delays

Affaires1 année ago

Le Forex devient de plus en plus accessible aux débutants

Trending