Connect with us

Santé Et Nutrition

How Baking Sourdough Bread Helped Me Stop Drinking and Stay Sober | Healthyish

admin

Published

on


Sourdough bread: Not only is it delicious and easy to digest, but it helped me quit drinking. My story about alcohol isn’t very dramatic. It wasn’t destroying my relationships or ruining my job. At first, drinking was just a convenient way to calm my anxiety at the end of the day. But, over the years, occasionally relaxing with a couple glasses of wine or a cocktail turned into a daily habit. I’d tried to give up alcohol in the past—including booze-free spells like Dry January—but I would always get restless before the end of the month. So when I decided to give up alcohol for good in October 2017, I knew I needed to be prepared. I was going to fill my sober afternoons and evenings with a laborious activity, one that would give me something to do with my hands. And that activity was baking sourdough.

This tedious and time-intensive task was perfect for my sobriety.

Today I get excited every time I pop the top off my Dutch oven to see how my little bread babies have grown. And I’m pretty sure I feel actual love for my starter, whom my husband named Calvin after the evolving alien organism in the movie Life. I’m not the first person to treat my starter like a member of the family or get swept up in the enchantment of sourdough.

This ancient baking practice appealed to me because sourdough is less temperamental than a succulent and requires much less care than a pet—two things people might invest in after going sober. But like both plants and animals, sourdough culture needs to be nurtured and nourished daily or weekly. Vanessa Kimbell, a baker who runs The Sourdough School in the U.K, told me creating sourdough involves trust; it’s like starting a new relationship.

“It’s almost like taking on a new lover,” says Kimbell. “You have to get familiar. It’s about hands, heart and mind coming together. It involves the whole of you.”

To my surprise, I felt this connection immediately. And while daily meditation was vital to helping me end my alcohol habit—becoming mindful about your behaviors is the best way to change them—my sourdough starter deserves a lot of credit. I created Calvin a couple of weeks after I decided to give up my nightly vodka on the rocks or two. And more than a year later, I still have Calvin and I’m still not drinking.

Most commercial breads are made with instant yeast. If you make this kind of bread at home, you can have a fresh-baked loaf in a couple of hours. Sourdough, on the other hand, uses a starter created from wild yeast and bacteria, requires a lot of attention and can take a half or whole day to rise. This tedious and time-intensive task was perfect for my sobriety.

Weeks before you can get your hands in the dough, you have to build up the sourdough starter that will ferment bread and help it rise. (It’s possible to buy an established starter from a bakery, but I wanted to create Calvin from scratch.) Cultivating a starter takes time, but it’s fairly simple: Mix equal weights of flour and water together. Loosely cover and wait 12-24 hours. To keep your jar from overflowing, discard half. Repeat. This process takes patience and dedication, qualities my sober self had in spades.

Creating a robust starter can take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the flour and ambient room temperature, writes Kimbell in her guidebook, The Sourdough School. When the starter becomes active, the yeast and bacteria are exposed to oxygen and create carbon dioxide bubbles that give sourdough its trademark holes.

It took days for Calvin to take a breath, but I kept feeding him. Per my internet instructions, I discarded half the starter every couple of days, replenished his food source, and hoped for the best. My apartment was chilly, so he took a couple weeks to really perk up. In my drinking days, I probably would have been annoyed that it was taking so long and given up. But every morning, I would wake up fresh from an alcohol-free night of sleep and check on Calvin. Each day, he had a few more breaths of life. And just like me, he was taking it one day at a time.

But the sourdough process gave me an activity to focus on when I didn’t want to simply sit with my thoughts.

I’ve been meditating with the Headspace app for a few years, so I know how to clear my mind and pay attention to my breath. But the sourdough process gave me an activity to focus on when I didn’t want to simply sit with my thoughts. In The Sourdough School, Kimbell writes that baking bread requires “a thoughtful and spiritual approach,” and I found this to be true. It’s why I turned baking bread into a full-day meditation, involving all of the senses, several times a week.

My bread-making method takes about two days. Before I can dive into the dough, I have to create a levain —the microbial mixture vital to the rising process. I take out two tablespoons of Calvin—after I feed him about eight hours earlier—and mix it with 75 grams of water and 75 grams of flour, loosely cover, and let sit overnight. When I check to see if my levain is ready, I have to look, taste, touch, and smell it. And with a stir, it crackles and popped as carbon dioxide is released.

After this overnight process, I finally get to my favorite part: working with the dough. After combining the levain, flour, and water, it has to rest—or autolyse—for 20 or 30 minutes so the flour can absorb the water and give the gluten and starch a chance to form. Then the salt is added and the dough sits for another 10 minutes. After this, you can either fold the bread once every 30 minutes for 2-½ hours or you can knead for 10 minutes straight and let sit for four hours. (I told you it takes a long time.)

I’ve never sculpted, but I imagine the creation process feels similar. The dough starts out as a formless, sticky blob, but after hours of alternating between folding and letting the dough rest, it becomes a smooth ball with form and substance that you can shape, bake, and eat.

And more than a year later, I still have Calvin and I’m still not drinking.

January marks my second sober start to the New Year, and I have no intentions of ever picking up a drink again. And while learning to make sourdough bread wasn’t the only thing that helped me give up booze—I learned to cook a lot of meals from scratch and my cabinet is filled with herbal teas—it did give me a new habit that doubled as a visual reminder of the commitment I had made: Calvin lives in a part of the kitchen I see every day.

At the beginning, it took more than a month for Calvin to become a thriving community of bacteria and yeast strong enough to give rise to a loaf of bread, and my first few weren’t pretty. But that was fine by me; it took about three months to forget about drinking on the daily anyway. A lot of people tell me they have a hard time giving up alcohol because life without a cocktail is just too boring. Years ago, I would have wholeheartedly agreed. But, for me, having sourdough to focus on helped replace an unproductive habit with something fun and fulfilling.

I never actually thought baking would help me quit drinking, but I’m glad it did. And as long as Calvin stays strong, I feel like I will too.



Source link

قالب وردپرس

Santé Et Nutrition

La sensation de membre fantôme enfin expliquée

admin

Published

on

By

Après une amputation, il n’est pas rare de parler de membre fantôme pour évoquer les douleurs et sensations ressenties alors que le membre n’est plus. Une nouvelle étude scientifique a permis d’élucider ce phénomène.

Pour évoquer les sensations et douleurs ressenties par les personnes amputées en lieu et place de leur main, bras ou encore jambe, on parle communément de membre fantôme. Mais au niveau nerveux et musculaire, le phénomène est encore difficile à expliquer.

Une nouvelle étude, parue le 21 février dans le revue Scientific Reports, a permis d’éclaircir ce phénomène méconnu. Elle suggère qu’après une amputation d’un membre, les zones du cerveau responsables du mouvement et des sensations de ce membre modifient leur communication fonctionnelle. Une nouvelle manifestation de la plasticité cérébrale, ou capacité du cerveau à se remodeler au cours de la vie en fonction des circonstances et événements perturbateurs.

Les chercheurs ont ici procédé à des examens cérébraux de personnes ayant subi l’amputation d’un membre inférieur. A l’aide d’IRM, ils ont constaté que le cerveau réagissait de manière excessive lorsque le moignon du patient était touché. Ils ont également constaté que le corps calleux, structure du cerveau reliant les zones du cortex responsables du mouvement et des sensations, perdait de sa force chez les personnes amputées.

En comparant les différences de communication entre zones cérébrales chez neuf amputés et chez neuf personnes “saines”, les chercheurs ont pu constater que les zones du cerveau responsables du mouvement et des sensations présentaient un schéma de communication anormal entre les hémisphères cérébraux droit et gauche chez les personnes amputées lorsque le moignon était touché, par rapport aux volontaires non-amputés. Cette communication anormale entre les deux hémisphères serait probablement due à une altération du corps calleux du cerveau.

Les modifications cérébrales en réponse à l’amputation font l’objet d’études depuis des années chez les patients signalant une douleur au membre fantôme. Cependant, nos résultats montrent qu’il existe un déséquilibre fonctionnel même en l’absence de douleur, chez les patients ne signalant que des sensations fantômes”, a expliqué Ivanei Bramati, doctorante à l’Université fédérale de Rio de Janeiro (Brésil) et principale auteure de l’étude.

Pour l’équipe de recherche, cette meilleure compréhension des modifications des réseaux de neurones suite à une amputation pourront conduire au développement de nouveaux traitements et dispositifs permettant de soulager la douleur ou la gêne des amputés quant à leur membre fantôme.

Notons par ailleurs que, de par l’essor des prothèses reliées au cerveau, la nécessité pour les amputés d’essayer de faire le deuil de leur membre fantôme n’est plus vraiment d’actualité.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Marseille: Des chercheurs vont bientôt tester le cannabis thérapeutique contre la maladie de Parkinson

admin

Published

on

By

Marseille, à la pointe sur le cannabis. Sur le cannabis thérapeutique plus exactement puisque les équipes de DHUNE, un centre d’excellence pour les maladies neurodégénératives, et l’association France Parkinson, lancent en partenariat deux études sur les effets de cette substance sur la maladie de Parkinson.

Une première étude vise à étudier les effets de deux principes actifs du cannabis, le tétrahydrocannabinol (THC) et le cannabidiol (CBD), sur les symptômes de la maladie de Parkinson, chez le rat. « Nous avons obtenu les financements et le feu vert des autorités pour lancer cette première étude. Elle devrait débuter dans les prochaines semaines », explique le professeur Alexandre Eusebio, du pôle neurosciences cliniques à l’Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille (APHM).

Une seconde étude chez l’homme

La seconde étude est très attendue puisqu’elle tend à étudier également les effets du THC et du CBD sur les symptômes de la maladie de Parkinson, mais cette fois, chez l’homme. Si elle a connu un certain retentissement médiatique, l’étude, menée par l’équipe de chercheurs composée également de Jean Philippe Azulay, chef du service neurologie à la Timone, Olivier Blin, responsable de Dhune, et Christelle Baunez, directrice de recherche au CNRS, n’a pas encore reçu le feu vert des autorités. « Cela ne diffère pas des protocoles classiques, nous devons fournir des informations sur la faisabilité de l’étude, ainsi que sur la sécurité des personnes testées », détaille Alexandre Eusebio.

Si les autorisations sont accordées, il s’agirait de la première étude sur les effets du cannabis chez les malades de Parkinson en France. Une première, alors même que la question du cannabis thérapeutique agite souvent les débats, quand 21 pays européens ont déjà légalisé son usage.

Des données existent, mais ne permettent pas l’interprétation

« L’efficacité des cannabinoïdes comme agents thérapeutiques dans divers troubles neurologiques tels que la spasticité, ou l’épilepsie a déjà été montrée. Des études expérimentales suggèrent que certains de ses composés, notamment le THC et le CBD auraient un potentiel effet neuroprotecteur ainsi qu’un effet sur les symptômes parkinsoniens », explique l’équipe de chercheurs. Des données existent, mais la méthodologie de ces études ne permet pas une interprétation assez fiable. D’où ces nouveaux travaux.

S’ils reçoivent le feu vert des autorités, les chercheurs testeront 30 patients, souffrant de la maladie de Parkinson, en leur administrant du cannabis par inhalation.

« Nous recruterons des personnes qui ont déjà été exposées au cannabis, il n’est pas envisageable éthiquement d’exposer des malades qui n’en ont jamais consommé. Durant deux jours d’hospitalisation, nous leur administrerons soit du cannabis, soit un placebo, et nous étudierons ensuite les effets sur les symptômes de la maladie », précise Alexandre Eusebio.

Pour l’instant, la méthodologie n’est pas encore définitivement arrêtée, elle pourrait être modifiée à la demande des autorités. Mais l’équipe de recherche sur les effets du cannabis espère pouvoir lancer l’étude d’ici la fin d’année 2019, voire début 2020.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Les emballages sont l’essentiel de la pollution plastique

admin

Published

on

By

Deux chercheurs commentent le plan annoncé par l’Etat et des industriels pour limiter la pollution aux déchets plastiques.

La France entame un sevrage de son addiction aux plastiques. Le ministère de la Transition écologique a dévoilé, jeudi, un « pacte » avec plusieurs entreprises et ONG visant à lutter contre la pollution découlant de l’usage de ce matériau. Les signataires s’engagent par exemple à abandonner le PVC dans les emballages ménagers ou industriels d’ici 2022, à « éliminer les autres emballages problématiques d’ici 2025 », et à rendre « réutilisables ou recyclables à 100% ces contenants » d’ici là.

Deux experts commentent, pour L’Express, les mesures prises : Maria-Luiza Pedrotti est chercheuse à l’Institut de la Mer de Villefranche (CNRS / Sorbonne Université) et coordinatrice scientifique de l’expédition Tara, qui a recueilli et analysé les microplastiques en Méditerranée. Mikael Kedzierski travaille à l’Institut de recherche Dupuy de Lôme (CNRS / Université Bretagne Sud). Il s’intéresse à l’impact des particules sur la santé et sur l’environnement.

Mikael Kedzierski : J’étudie la pollution par les micro-plastiques, des déchets sous forme de particules dont la taille reste inférieure à 5 millimètres, souvent visibles sur la plage ou en mer. La majorité de cette pollution provient en fait des emballages, bouteilles ou morceaux de films plastiques. Si les organismes vivants savent dégrader progressivement les déchets en bois ou les algues mortes, leur capacité à s’en prendre aux plastiques est beaucoup plus réduite. Alors ces plastiques persistent dans le milieu naturel, de plusieurs décennies à plusieurs siècles. Et une fois en mer, il est coûteux de les retirer. La solution la plus pertinente reste encore de bloquer cette pollution avant qu’elle ne l’atteigne.

Maria-Luiza Pedrotti : Les plastiques représentent un danger potentiel pour toute la chaîne alimentaire marine, jusqu’à l’homme. Or depuis 1950, nos sociétés ont produit 8,3 milliards de tonnes de plastique. Il faut parvenir à diminuer voire stopper cette production, car on ne pourra pas nettoyer les océans. Les Etats sont conscients du problème, mais de là à passer aux vraies mesures, c’est un défi.

Maria-Luiza Pedrotti : Sur le papier, ce sont d’excellentes mesures, assez ambitieuses pour mener de front ce combat. Mais je suis toujours partagée entre ma casquette de scientifique et celle d’activiste : si ces décisions ne sont pas accompagnées et sans contraintes, l’industrie et les commerçants ne suivront pas. Regardez, par exemple, combien est peu appliquée l’interdiction des sachets plastique à usage unique sur les marchés… D’autre part, il faudrait de telles mesures coordonnées pour tous les pays, sinon cela va être compliqué d’éradiquer cette pollution : la mer n’a pas de frontières.

Mikael Kedzierski : La France n’est pas très en avance sur la question, par rapport à d’autres pays européens comme les Scandinaves, en particulier sur les questions de recyclage. Certes, ce plan annoncé va forcément avoir un impact positif pour le pays. Reste qu’au niveau international, les principales sources du plastique des océans sont les pays en développement… Toutefois il faut noter que la France et de nombreux autres pays exportent aussi une partie de leurs déchets plastiques vers ces régions, notamment en Asie, et sont donc tout aussi responsables de cette pollution globale.

Maria-Luiza Pedrotti : Cela reste un problème chez les industriels, pour qui le plastique recyclé coûte 30 % plus cher que le plastique vierge. Les plastiques à usage unique sont les plus dangereux parce qu’ils ne sont pas rentables à recycler, en particulier le polystyrène expansé (PSE). Et en amont, il faut aussi regarder les systèmes de collecte. Depuis 2003, l’Allemagne a un système de consigne intéressant : le prix des contenants comprend une caution, à récupérer en le rapportant. Cela coûte 8 centimes pour une canette, 15 pour une bouteille en plastique et 25 pour un contenant non recyclable. Résultat : le taux de collecte atteint maintenant 90 %.

Mikael Kedzierski : Sur l’efficacité du recyclage, le plastique pourrait surtout être réutilisé une dizaine de fois sans que ses propriétés techniques ne soient vraiment dégradées. Sa légèreté, sa résistance et son faible coût sont justement la raison pour laquelle il fait partie de notre quotidien. Sauf qu’on ne l’utilise que sur des temps très courts – surtout les emballages – de quelques jours à quelques mois, avant d’en faire un déchet. Un plastique peut pourtant avoir plusieurs vies.

Continue Reading

Chat

Actualités2 semaines ago

Recensement: Statistique Canada révise sa question sur l’origine ethnique

Actualités2 semaines ago

Pénurie d’infirmières: le gouvernement dévoile sa stratégie

Actualités2 semaines ago

Commerce.Au Canada, les vins des colonies israéliennes ne peuvent plus porter la mention “Produit d’Israël”

Actualités2 semaines ago

Le Bloc québécois, plus nécessaire que jamais

Uncategorized2 semaines ago

Les clients de Desjardins, pas les bienvenus partout

Actualités2 semaines ago

« Ce climat de violence est inacceptable » : les députés LRM inquiets après de nouvelles dégradations de permanences

Actualités2 semaines ago

Hyundai enquêtera sur l’explosion d’une Kona EV électrique à Montréal

Actualités2 semaines ago

Statistique Canada revoit sa question sur l’origine ethnique dans le recensement

Actualités2 semaines ago

Quelles mesures du Ceta sont mauvaises pour l’environnement ?

Actualités2 semaines ago

Déjà une demande d’action collective déposée contre Capital One au Québec

Actualités2 semaines ago

Le quart des Albertains prêts à quitter le pays

Actualités2 semaines ago

Le Canada devra intégrer le concept de finance durable pour assurer sa croissance

Arts Et Spectacles1 mois ago

Des croupiers de casinos de Vancouver congédiés pour tricherie et complot

Actualités2 mois ago

Table ronde d’actualité internationale Royaume-(dés)Uni cherche nouveau leader

Actualités2 mois ago

Economie.Libra, nouvelle monnaie virtuelle et bras armé de Facebook

Actualités2 mois ago

Vers un capitalisme vert ? De très gros investisseurs internationaux dénoncent plus de 700 grandes entreprises, dont 39 françaises, pour défaut de politiques environnementales

Actualités2 mois ago

Les États-Unis publient de nouvelles photos contre l’Iran et déploient 1000 soldats dans la région

Actualités2 mois ago

Magnifique Society 2019 : un festival rémois aux ambitions internationales

Actualités2 mois ago

La France dénonce «l’annexion» de la Crimée par la Russie, Moscou lui rappelle le cas de Mayotte

Actualités2 mois ago

Simon Laplace : «les Français éprouvent une certaine tendresse pour Jacques Chirac»

Anglais9 mois ago

Body found after downtown Lethbridge apartment building fire, police investigating – Lethbridge

Styles De Vie10 mois ago

Salon du chocolat 2018: les 5 temps forts

Anglais8 mois ago

27 CP Rail cars derail near Lake Louise, Alta.

Anglais7 mois ago

Man facing eviction from family home on Toronto Islands gets reprieve — for now

Santé Et Nutrition10 mois ago

Gluten-Free Muffins

Santé Et Nutrition8 mois ago

We Try Kin Euphorics and How to REALLY Get the Glow | Healthyish

Anglais7 mois ago

This B.C. woman’s recipe is one of the most popular of all time — and the story behind it is bananas

Anglais6 mois ago

A photo taken on Toronto’s Corso Italia 49 years ago became a family legend. No one saw it — until now

Styles De Vie11 mois ago

Renaud Capuçon, rédacteur en chef du Figaroscope

Mode7 mois ago

Paris : chez Cécile Roederer co-fondatrice de Smallable

Anglais9 mois ago

Ontario Tories argue Trudeau’s carbon plan is ‘unconstitutional’

Anglais9 mois ago

Trudeau government would reject Jason Kenney, taxpayers group in carbon tax court fight

Anglais11 mois ago

Condo developer Thomas Liu — who collected millions but hasn’t built anything — loses court fight with Town of Ajax

Anglais6 mois ago

This couple shares a 335-square-foot micro condo on Queen St. — and loves it

Anglais9 mois ago

100 years later, Montreal’s Black Watch regiment returns to Wallers, France

Anglais7 mois ago

Province’s push for private funding, additional stops puts Scarborough subway at risk of delays

Technologie6 mois ago

YouTube recommande de la pornographie juvénile, allègue un internaute

Styles De Vie7 mois ago

Ford Ranger Raptor, le pick-up roule des mécaniques

Styles De Vie7 mois ago

quel avenir pour le Carré des Horlogers?

Styles De Vie7 mois ago

Le Michelin salue le dynamisme de la gastronomie française

Trending