Connect with us

Santé Et Nutrition

I Tried a Technical Challenge from the Great British Baking Show

admin

Published

on


Every time I finish an episode of the Great British Baking Show and head into the kitchen, I feel like a kid cartwheeling in the living room after watching Olympic gymnastics. There’s something about seeing those athletes—I mean, bakers—schvitzing in the hellishly hot conditions of the tent that I find not only entertaining but also fomenting. It lights a fire under my butt and launches me straight toward the stand mixer with hopes that, with enough creaming and folding (and maybe some lessons in British pronunciations), I too could be in that tent, attempting the impossible: an ice cream bombe made from scratch in 90 minutes and 99° weather, a “selfie” constructed from cake, a chandelier of sugar cookies, a handshake with Paul Hollywood without crumbling to the floor.

And since this wasn’t actually the Olympics, my aspirations weren’t all that irrational. These tasks were something I—an avid home baker, just like all of the show’s actual contestants—could really, possibly, maybe, theoretically do. Hadn’t my years of baking brownies on the weekend (and—okay, okay, I’ll admit it—a few stints in professional kitchens) prepared me for this very moment? So, to see just what sort of baking chops I really had, I embarked on a journey to make just one recipe straight from one of the show’s technical challenges. How would I fare at the judges’ table?

The recipe

The constraints of a true technical challenge include a bare-bones recipe, a stunningly short period of time, and bakers groaning all around you (also: equipment spontaneously combusting and proofing drawers that seem intent to sabotage any dough that’s put inside). Since no one wanted to play GBBS with me, I would be on my own. And since I’m no masochist, I decided to give myself plenty of time and to choose a recipe from early on in the contest. It didn’t need to be anything totally wacky—no raspberry blancmange or two-tier lavender and lemon curd fox cake for me. Just something most of the bakers had made with moderate success.

So, I landed on Le Gâteau Vert, a lemony pistachio cake colored green with spinach (!), and the technical challenge from 2018’s cake week (episode 2). First of all, it was supposedly Claude Monet’s favorite cake, which he ate every year on his birthday. I love Monet! Who doesn’t? Second, did I mention its Kermit-green hue comes from spinach? Monet, you crazy artist, you. Third, it’s decorated with edible flowers. So twee. Fourth, could it even taste good (have I mentioned the spinach)? I had to know. And fifth, it’s made up of several components—marzipan, génoise sponge cake (pronounced gen-o-ease in British speak), buttercream, fondant—that would each present ample opportunity to flounder flourish. (If you’ve watched the episode…poor Karen!) Finally, it was short and simple, but less in the reassuring, “this’ll be easy” way, and more in the “holy cow, how do I make a sponge cake without any details about what the batter should look like” way.

The set up

Since I was only a contestant on the GBBS of my imagination, I had to source everything myself: multiple types of sugar (icing, caster, and “fondant icing sugar,” which does not seem to exist in the U.S.); 500 grams of pistachios (which, as it turns out, is a lot of money); kirsch (cherry brandy); and the impossible-to-track-down pistachio essence.

Now’s a good time to confess that I took some liberties here: Why buy pistachios when I could buy pistachio flour and skip the shelling and grinding? Why buy caster sugar when I could grind regular ol’ sugar in a food processor? And why order “fondant icing sugar” from the U.K. when I could just…find a poured fondant recipe consisting of white chocolate, corn syrup, and confectioners’ sugar? I wasn’t going to walk into a burning building blindfolded, okay?

The moment(s) of truth

I spread out my process over two days. (Call me an imposter—I’d say I’m a realist.) On day one, I made the marzipan and the génoise, both of which I chilled overnight. On day 2, I made the spinach buttercream and the fondant, which set me up to assemble the cake.

I started with the pistachio marzipan—baby steps!—which was easy to make. Mix ground pistachios with confectioners’ sugar, an egg white, and “pistachio essence” (equal parts vanilla and almond extract, in my version), then knead it together into a Play Doh-esque mass. The only problem was that one egg white did not even moisten the dry mixture. I added another, grateful that neither Prue nor Paul was looking over my shoulder, and trudged on.

Next came the “sponge” (a.k.a. the cake), which was doomed from the get-go. For a notoriously difficult cake (leavened with only eggs, rather than a mixture of baking powder and baking soda, génoise are known to fall flat), the instructions were vague. So…I started to read other recipes. But just for some reassurance! How “thick and pale” should the eggs really be? I wondered. Could I pour hot butter into that sensitive mixture without tempering it first? All of this outside research felt a little bit like taking an open-book exam—i.e. condoned cheating. The down side? It totally shook my confidence: What would I have done in the tent, with no access to well-written sponge recipes?

But once I saw that the cake didn’t rise high in the oven—it was a fairly squat thing, only an inch or so tall—I knew I should’ve separated the eggs, whisked the yolks until they held ribbons, and folded in well-whipped whites. Basically, I should’ve followed a different recipe altogether. Instead, I wrapped up my small friend, stuck it in the fridge, and tried to forget about the fact that I’d have to cut it in three horizontal slices the next day.

The following morning, I set out to make the French buttercream. First step: “spinach water,” made of blanched spinach blended up and squeezed through a cheesecloth. I then used this pond scum to make a simple syrup, which I brought up to 235°F. (This I also had to research, frantically Googling, “At what temperature does sugar syrup form a thread between two spoons?”). I streamed it slowly into egg yolks before adding softened butter, ground pistachios, and, for some reason, kirsch. It was at this point in the process that the entire Bon Appétit Test Kitchen began to smell so strongly of hot spinach that everyone walking by said aloud, “What is that smell?” I promised them the result would be delicious, trying to convince myself the same.

sarah jampel spinach cake

Photo by Chelsie Craig

Spreading the spinach buttercream over the first layer. The second “layer” is on the bottom right.

Next, I had to slice the sponge into three layers. This was a fool’s errand: No matter how many videos I watched about how to evenly divide a cake into layers, no matter how many toothpicks I used to mark where the slices should be, no matter how long and sharp my serrated knife, it was impossible. Senior food editors Molly Baz and Chris Morocco, standing nearby, grimaced. I got halfway through trimming off the first paper-thin layer when I decided to turn back and slice the cake in two instead. But this was sort of like deciding halfway through a bob haircut that you actually want a trim. The cake was butchered: The top “layer” was thin shavings of disparate pieces connected by the puniest of crumbs. If I were in the tent, Noel and Sandi would’ve come over to my station at this moment to offer some comedic relief. Instead, I had only the glares from BA’s food editors.

There was only one way forward: I smeared the bottom layer with spinach buttercream, pieced the crumbs on top, then covered the whole situation with more of the green stuff, hoping no one would notice that, where there were supposed to be three layers of cake, I had just one and a half. I rolled out the marzipan and draped it over the cake, an extremely satisfying process because it covered the whole mess in a smooth surface—the equivalent of stuffing the cake into Spanx.

sarah jampel spinach cake 4

Photo by Chelsie Craig

If an even marzipan cover hides all the mistakes, did they even ever happen?

The final step: fondant. Since I followed a different recipe entirely (forgive me, God), I had no problems. I poured the mixture—melted white chocolate, corn syrup, confectioners’ sugar, water, and leftover spinach water—over the cake and watched it drip down the surface and over the sides in thick ribbons. Now the cake wasn’t only smooth—it was also shiny. The one thing it wasn’t? Very green. The white chocolate muted the spinach’s green into something just shy of white, like the color of my sneakers after one day of wear.

sarah jampel spinach cake 3

Photo by Chelsie Craig

Pouring the fondant over top. It should’ve been a vibrant green but, instead, leaned towards off-white.

Thankfully, festooned with pansies and $50-per-pound Sicilian pistachios, it actually looked presentable. I wouldn’t have been so ashamed to bring it to the judges’ tables.

The part where we eat it

The cake sliced nicely: There was a layer of fondant and a layer of marzipan followed by a mash of sponge cake and buttercream.

Chris Morocco gave it one look and decided he wouldn’t deign to taste it: Génoise, he told me, was meant to rise, then be sliced into beautifully discrete layers. Chris, I said to myself (because I would never actually talk back to Chris), I was just (kind of sort of) following the recipe!!! Would the génoise have been fluffier, taller, prouder had I used Natasha Pickowicz’s extremely detailed recipe? Why, yes! Did the GBBS bakers have the knowledge and wherewithal to skip Prue’s instructions and go with what they knew to be a better technique? Clearly! With episodes that jump between nearly a dozen contestants, how the heck was I supposed to grasp the sort of wizardry going down when the cameras cut away?

sarah jampel spinach cake 1

Photo by Chelsie Craig, Food Styling by Sarah Jampel

It’s not so bad but, hey, where are the layers?

But Morocco missed out. Because it tasted…fine! The extreme amount of buttercream in comparison to sponge produced a sweet, tender, and not-at-all dry effect. The marzipan was pleasantly chewy, and the fondant, since it was mostly white chocolate and corn syrup, was candy-like. People liked it! It was nutty and lemony, with no detectable spinach. Some folks at the office even asked to take slices home. Maybe my cake, with its short stature, ill-defined layers, and dirty-white hue, wouldn’t have placed high in terms of looks, but it got the flavor down pat. It lost the swimsuit competition but won the talent segment.

So what did I learn, besides the fact that television is deceptive and that spinach is a suitable but stinky natural food coloring? Well, as much as people say baking is about precision, that’s only true if you’re following a recipe you trust. As soon as you sense that something isn’t right—like that sponge cake isn’t going to work if you pour hot butter directly into whipped eggs or that the dough is lumpy when it really should be smooth—that’s when baking becomes about instincts and improvisation. Those contestants aren’t just good bakers, they’re forward-thinking problem-solvers.

And on that note, I also learned that I won’t be tossing my hat into the GBBS ring any time soon.



Source link

قالب وردپرس

Santé Et Nutrition

Une boisson frappée végétalienne pour tous les amateurs de desserts

admin

Published

on

By

(EN) Compte tenu des changements apportés au Guide alimentaire canadien qui recommande de consommer davantage d’aliments à base de plantes, il est maintenant temps d’essayer de nouvelles recettes. Cette boisson frappée végétalienne composée de produits végétaux constitue la parfaite petite gourmandise pour vos réceptions en plein air cet été.

S’inspirant de la pêche Melba, cette boisson frappée est à base de noix de coco, donc sans produits laitiers, tandis que la mangue surgelée remplace à la perfection le populaire fruit à noyau. Résultat : une jolie couleur pêche alléchante qui complète les nuances exotiques de cette boisson onctueuse bien fraîche et désaltérante.

« Végétal n’est pas forcément synonyme de fade », dit Martin Patenaude, Chef pour les Écoles culinaires PC. Il ajoute que cette boisson frappée tendance est une gourmandise estivale qui fera fureur auprès de vos invités.

Boisson frappée Melba à la mangue

Temps de préparation : 10 minutes
Prêt en : 10 minutes
Portions : 2

Ingrédients 

  • 250 ml (1 tasse) de morceaux de mangues surgelés
  • 250 ml (1 tasse) de Substitut de yogourt probiotique sans produits laitiers au lait de coco de culture saveur vanille PC, divisé
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de jus d’orange fraîchement pressée, divisé
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de dessert végétal surgelé à la mangue et au lait de coco, divisé
  • 250 ml (1 tasse) de framboises rouges entières surgelées
  • 4 framboises fraîches, pour la garniture

Méthode 

  1. Mélanger la mangue, 125 ml (½ tasse) de substitut de yogourt, 45 ml (3 c. à soupe) de jus d’orange et 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) de dessert surgelé dans le mélangeur; mixer jusqu’à obtention d’une texture lisse et onctueuse, en ajoutant 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) d’eau ou du jus d’orange au besoin pour obtenir la consistance souhaitée. Verser le mélange dans deux grands verres de 250 ml (1 tasse), en le répartissant de manière égale.
  2. Astuce : Utilisez une passoire à tamis fin pour éliminer la pulpe du jus d’orange avant de le verser dans le mélangeur.
  3. Mélanger les framboises surgelées, les 125 ml (½ tasse) de substitut de yogourt et les 45 ml (3 c. à soupe) de jus d’orange restants dans le même mélangeur; mixer jusqu’à obtention d’une texture lisse et onctueuse. Verser la préparation sur le mélange à la mangue, en la répartissant uniformément. Remuer pour créer un effet ombré.
  4. Garnir chaque boisson frappée avec les 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) de dessert surgelé restants. Garnir de framboises fraîches, en les répartissant uniformément.

Information nutritionnelle par portion : 260 calories, 5 g de lipides (dont 3,5 g de gras saturés), 25 mg de sodium, 53 g de glucides, 1 g de fibres, 37 g de sucres et 3 g de protéines.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Cet été, ajoutez de la saveur à vos pâtes

admin

Published

on

By

(EN) Mayonnaise et macaroni, écartez-vous! Les tomates séchées au soleil et la bette à carde de saison mettent l’été à l’honneur dans cette salade de pâtes améliorée composée de délicats girasoli, une pâte farcie qui doit son nom à sa forme de tournesol. Pour changer du basilic, ce pesto est une excellente façon de savourer la bette à carde : un peu de parmesan au goût prononcé, des pignons de pin et un soupçon de citron acidulé atténuent l’amertume de ce légume vert à feuilles.

Vous voulez changer le profil de saveur? Michelle Pennock, cheffe cuisinière de la cuisine-laboratoire PC,vous donne cette astuce pour cuisiner ce plat très coloré :. « Remplacez les pignons de pin par des noix ou des amandes grillées hachées, si vous le souhaitez. »

Salade de pâtes aux tomates séchées au soleil avec pesto de bette à carde

Temps de préparation : 15 minutes
Temps de cuisson : 4 minutes
Temps de refroidissement : 15 minutes
Prêt en : 35 minutes
Portions : 6

Ingrédients

  • Demi-botte de bette à carde (en séparant les feuilles et les tiges)
  • 600 g (1 emb.) de Pâtes Girasole mozzarella et tomates séchées au soleil PC SplendidoMD (pâtes aux œufs farcies italiennes traditionnelles)
  • 150 ml (2/3 tasse) d’huile d’olive extra-vierge
  • 2 gousses d’ail, finement hachées
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de pignons de pin, grillés
  • 90 ml (6 c. à soupe) de fromage parmigiano reggiano affiné à pâte dure vieilli 24 mois, râpé
  • 15 ml (1 c. à soupe) de jus de citron fraîchement pressé
  • 2 ml (½ c. à thé) de sel
  • 1 ml (¼ c. à thé) de poivre noir
  • 25 ml (2 c. à soupe) de tomates séchées au soleil hachées dans de l’huile assaisonnée

Méthode 

  1. Hacher grossièrement les feuilles de bette à carde. Réserver. Trancher finement les tiges de bette à carde.
  2. Faire bouillir 2 L (8 tasses) d’eau légèrement salée dans une grande casserole. Ajouter les pâtes et les tiges de bette à carde; faire cuire de 3 à 4 minutes, en remuant de temps en temps et en réduisant le feu au besoin pour maintenir une légère ébullition. Égoutter. Étaler les pâtes en une seule couche sur une plaque de cuisson tapissée de papier sulfurisé. Verser un filet de 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) d’huile. Laisser entièrement refroidir pendant 15 minutes environ.
  3. Pendant ce temps, mélanger ensemble l’ail et 60 ml (1/4 tasse) de pignons de pin et de fromage (chaque) dans le robot culinaire jusqu’à ce qu’ils soient finement hachés. Ajouter les feuilles de bette à carde. Avec le moteur en marche, verser graduellement en filet les 125 ml (1/2 tasse) d’huile restants jusqu’à obtention d’une texture lisse. Incorporer le jus de citron, le sel et le poivre.
  4. Mélanger les pâtes avec 125 ml (1/2 tasse) de pesto dans un grand saladier pour bien les enrober. Conserver le reste de pesto pour un autre usage. Garnir de tomates et des 30 ml (2 c. à soupe) de pignons et de fromage (chaque) restants. Servir à température ambiante.

Information nutritionnelle par portion : 460 calories, 29 g de lipides (dont 6 g de gras saturés), 780 mg de sodium, 39 g de glucides, 3 g de fibres, 8 g de sucres et 13 g de protéines.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Une nouvelle technologie donne plus de libertés aux personnes atteintes de diabète

admin

Published

on

By

(EN) Selon l’Association canadienne du diabète, au Canada environ 300 000 personnes sont atteintes du diabète de type 1, une maladie auto-immune où l’organisme cesse de produire de l’insuline. Heureusement, grâce à des conseils appropriés et les bons outils et technologies de prise en charge, le diagnostic de diabète de type 1 n’est plus un obstacle.

La surveillance du glucose en continu (SGC) est une innovation toute récente en matière de prise en charge du diabète. La technologie de SGC permet d’effectuer un suivi de l’évolution du taux de glucose à intervalles réguliers. Elle peut fournir aux utilisateurs des résultats en temps réel, toutes les cinq minutes. Comprendre ce qui se passe dans l’organisme lorsque le taux de glucose varie permet de prendre de meilleures décisions qui facilitent la prise en charge proactive de la maladie. Cette technologie élimine presque entièrement le besoin d’effectuer un prélèvement de sang au bout du doigt chaque fois que l’utilisateur veut connaître son taux de glucose.

Un système de SGC change entièrement le mode de prise en charge du diabète de type 1 :

  1. Connaître les taux de glucose en un coup d’œil. La technologie de SGC portable permet de mesurer le taux de glucose à l’aide d’un petit capteur inséré juste sous la peau. Un émetteur fixé sur le dessus du capteur transmet ces données toutes les cinq minutes par communication sans fil à un récepteur ou à un appareil intelligent compatible – comme un téléphone – pour que vous puissiez consulter les données disponibles en un coup d’œil.
  2. Déjouer l’hypoglycémie avant qu’elle n’arrive. Les épisodes d’hypoglycémie (taux de glucose bas) peuvent souvent être angoissants et inconfortables, voire dangereux. Avoir un appareil capable de vous avertir de l’imminence d’un taux de glucose bas peut vous permettre de le déjouer avant qu’il n’arrive. Cette capacité de prédire un taux de glucose bas est particulièrement importante chez les personnes qui ont une perception altérée de l’hypoglycémie, soit les personnes qui ne ressentent pas les symptômes précurseurs d’un taux de glucose bas.
  3. Moins d’inquiétudes concernant le diabète pour profiter davantage du moment présent. La surveillance du glucose en continu et les alertes paramétrables vous préviennent avant que votre taux de glucose soit trop bas ou trop haut, ce qui apaise l’incertitude et élimine le questionnement constant.

Lorsque vous élaborez votre plan de prise en charge du diabète de type 1, consultez votre professionnel de la santé au sujet du système Dexcom G5 Mobile de surveillance du glucose en continu.

Continue Reading

Chat

Santé Et Nutrition2 mois ago

Une boisson frappée végétalienne pour tous les amateurs de desserts

Santé Et Nutrition2 mois ago

Cet été, ajoutez de la saveur à vos pâtes

Santé Et Nutrition2 mois ago

Une nouvelle technologie donne plus de libertés aux personnes atteintes de diabète

Santé Et Nutrition2 mois ago

Une nouvelle façon de percevoir le diabète de type 1

Santé Et Nutrition2 mois ago

Comment freiner la crise des opioïdes dans les petites villes

Styles De Vie2 mois ago

Les jeunes et les opioïdes : Ce que les parents doivent savoir

Styles De Vie2 mois ago

Prenez soin de vous cet été

Styles De Vie2 mois ago

Survivre à un voyage en famille

Styles De Vie2 mois ago

Magasiner pour un véhicule en 2019

Styles De Vie2 mois ago

5 bonnes raisons de louer un bateau de plaisance

Affaires3 mois ago

Le stress financier affecte-t-il votre santé physique et mentale ?

Affaires3 mois ago

Les plans de location avec option d’achat vous conviennent-ils?

Affaires3 mois ago

Utiliser votre auto comme garantie pour un prêt : ce qu’il faut savoir

Affaires3 mois ago

Les fraudes par carte de crédit sont de plus en plus fréquentes – quoi faire si vous en êtes victime

Affaires3 mois ago

Vous achetez une maison? Attention à la fraude hypothécaire

Affaires3 mois ago

Cinq arnaques susceptibles de tromper même les personnes les plus avisées – comment vous protéger

Affaires3 mois ago

Les inconvénients financiers d’être trop aimable

Affaires3 mois ago

Voici une astuce simple pour s’enrichir

Affaires3 mois ago

Faites fructifier vos placements en un clic

Affaires3 mois ago

Utiliser pour la première fois des services bancaires au Canada

Anglais1 année ago

Body found after downtown Lethbridge apartment building fire, police investigating – Lethbridge

Styles De Vie1 année ago

Salon du chocolat 2018: les 5 temps forts

Anglais11 mois ago

27 CP Rail cars derail near Lake Louise, Alta.

Anglais11 mois ago

Man facing eviction from family home on Toronto Islands gets reprieve — for now

Santé Et Nutrition1 année ago

Gluten-Free Muffins

Santé Et Nutrition1 année ago

We Try Kin Euphorics and How to REALLY Get the Glow | Healthyish

Anglais11 mois ago

This B.C. woman’s recipe is one of the most popular of all time — and the story behind it is bananas

Anglais11 mois ago

Ontario’s Tories hope Ryan Gosling video will keep supporters from breaking up with the party

Anglais10 mois ago

A photo taken on Toronto’s Corso Italia 49 years ago became a family legend. No one saw it — until now

Styles De Vie1 année ago

Renaud Capuçon, rédacteur en chef du Figaroscope

Mode11 mois ago

Paris : chez Cécile Roederer co-fondatrice de Smallable

Anglais1 année ago

Ontario Tories argue Trudeau’s carbon plan is ‘unconstitutional’

Anglais10 mois ago

This couple shares a 335-square-foot micro condo on Queen St. — and loves it

Anglais1 année ago

Condo developer Thomas Liu — who collected millions but hasn’t built anything — loses court fight with Town of Ajax

Anglais1 année ago

Trudeau government would reject Jason Kenney, taxpayers group in carbon tax court fight

Anglais1 année ago

100 years later, Montreal’s Black Watch regiment returns to Wallers, France

Technologie10 mois ago

YouTube recommande de la pornographie juvénile, allègue un internaute

Anglais11 mois ago

Province’s push for private funding, additional stops puts Scarborough subway at risk of delays

Styles De Vie11 mois ago

Ford Ranger Raptor, le pick-up roule des mécaniques

Affaires11 mois ago

Le Forex devient de plus en plus accessible aux débutants

Trending