Connect with us

Santé Et Nutrition

I Tried a Technical Challenge from the Great British Baking Show

admin

Published

on


Every time I finish an episode of the Great British Baking Show and head into the kitchen, I feel like a kid cartwheeling in the living room after watching Olympic gymnastics. There’s something about seeing those athletes—I mean, bakers—schvitzing in the hellishly hot conditions of the tent that I find not only entertaining but also fomenting. It lights a fire under my butt and launches me straight toward the stand mixer with hopes that, with enough creaming and folding (and maybe some lessons in British pronunciations), I too could be in that tent, attempting the impossible: an ice cream bombe made from scratch in 90 minutes and 99° weather, a “selfie” constructed from cake, a chandelier of sugar cookies, a handshake with Paul Hollywood without crumbling to the floor.

And since this wasn’t actually the Olympics, my aspirations weren’t all that irrational. These tasks were something I—an avid home baker, just like all of the show’s actual contestants—could really, possibly, maybe, theoretically do. Hadn’t my years of baking brownies on the weekend (and—okay, okay, I’ll admit it—a few stints in professional kitchens) prepared me for this very moment? So, to see just what sort of baking chops I really had, I embarked on a journey to make just one recipe straight from one of the show’s technical challenges. How would I fare at the judges’ table?

The recipe

The constraints of a true technical challenge include a bare-bones recipe, a stunningly short period of time, and bakers groaning all around you (also: equipment spontaneously combusting and proofing drawers that seem intent to sabotage any dough that’s put inside). Since no one wanted to play GBBS with me, I would be on my own. And since I’m no masochist, I decided to give myself plenty of time and to choose a recipe from early on in the contest. It didn’t need to be anything totally wacky—no raspberry blancmange or two-tier lavender and lemon curd fox cake for me. Just something most of the bakers had made with moderate success.

So, I landed on Le Gâteau Vert, a lemony pistachio cake colored green with spinach (!), and the technical challenge from 2018’s cake week (episode 2). First of all, it was supposedly Claude Monet’s favorite cake, which he ate every year on his birthday. I love Monet! Who doesn’t? Second, did I mention its Kermit-green hue comes from spinach? Monet, you crazy artist, you. Third, it’s decorated with edible flowers. So twee. Fourth, could it even taste good (have I mentioned the spinach)? I had to know. And fifth, it’s made up of several components—marzipan, génoise sponge cake (pronounced gen-o-ease in British speak), buttercream, fondant—that would each present ample opportunity to flounder flourish. (If you’ve watched the episode…poor Karen!) Finally, it was short and simple, but less in the reassuring, “this’ll be easy” way, and more in the “holy cow, how do I make a sponge cake without any details about what the batter should look like” way.

The set up

Since I was only a contestant on the GBBS of my imagination, I had to source everything myself: multiple types of sugar (icing, caster, and “fondant icing sugar,” which does not seem to exist in the U.S.); 500 grams of pistachios (which, as it turns out, is a lot of money); kirsch (cherry brandy); and the impossible-to-track-down pistachio essence.

Now’s a good time to confess that I took some liberties here: Why buy pistachios when I could buy pistachio flour and skip the shelling and grinding? Why buy caster sugar when I could grind regular ol’ sugar in a food processor? And why order “fondant icing sugar” from the U.K. when I could just…find a poured fondant recipe consisting of white chocolate, corn syrup, and confectioners’ sugar? I wasn’t going to walk into a burning building blindfolded, okay?

The moment(s) of truth

I spread out my process over two days. (Call me an imposter—I’d say I’m a realist.) On day one, I made the marzipan and the génoise, both of which I chilled overnight. On day 2, I made the spinach buttercream and the fondant, which set me up to assemble the cake.

I started with the pistachio marzipan—baby steps!—which was easy to make. Mix ground pistachios with confectioners’ sugar, an egg white, and “pistachio essence” (equal parts vanilla and almond extract, in my version), then knead it together into a Play Doh-esque mass. The only problem was that one egg white did not even moisten the dry mixture. I added another, grateful that neither Prue nor Paul was looking over my shoulder, and trudged on.

Next came the “sponge” (a.k.a. the cake), which was doomed from the get-go. For a notoriously difficult cake (leavened with only eggs, rather than a mixture of baking powder and baking soda, génoise are known to fall flat), the instructions were vague. So…I started to read other recipes. But just for some reassurance! How “thick and pale” should the eggs really be? I wondered. Could I pour hot butter into that sensitive mixture without tempering it first? All of this outside research felt a little bit like taking an open-book exam—i.e. condoned cheating. The down side? It totally shook my confidence: What would I have done in the tent, with no access to well-written sponge recipes?

But once I saw that the cake didn’t rise high in the oven—it was a fairly squat thing, only an inch or so tall—I knew I should’ve separated the eggs, whisked the yolks until they held ribbons, and folded in well-whipped whites. Basically, I should’ve followed a different recipe altogether. Instead, I wrapped up my small friend, stuck it in the fridge, and tried to forget about the fact that I’d have to cut it in three horizontal slices the next day.

The following morning, I set out to make the French buttercream. First step: “spinach water,” made of blanched spinach blended up and squeezed through a cheesecloth. I then used this pond scum to make a simple syrup, which I brought up to 235°F. (This I also had to research, frantically Googling, “At what temperature does sugar syrup form a thread between two spoons?”). I streamed it slowly into egg yolks before adding softened butter, ground pistachios, and, for some reason, kirsch. It was at this point in the process that the entire Bon Appétit Test Kitchen began to smell so strongly of hot spinach that everyone walking by said aloud, “What is that smell?” I promised them the result would be delicious, trying to convince myself the same.

sarah jampel spinach cake

Photo by Chelsie Craig

Spreading the spinach buttercream over the first layer. The second “layer” is on the bottom right.

Next, I had to slice the sponge into three layers. This was a fool’s errand: No matter how many videos I watched about how to evenly divide a cake into layers, no matter how many toothpicks I used to mark where the slices should be, no matter how long and sharp my serrated knife, it was impossible. Senior food editors Molly Baz and Chris Morocco, standing nearby, grimaced. I got halfway through trimming off the first paper-thin layer when I decided to turn back and slice the cake in two instead. But this was sort of like deciding halfway through a bob haircut that you actually want a trim. The cake was butchered: The top “layer” was thin shavings of disparate pieces connected by the puniest of crumbs. If I were in the tent, Noel and Sandi would’ve come over to my station at this moment to offer some comedic relief. Instead, I had only the glares from BA’s food editors.

There was only one way forward: I smeared the bottom layer with spinach buttercream, pieced the crumbs on top, then covered the whole situation with more of the green stuff, hoping no one would notice that, where there were supposed to be three layers of cake, I had just one and a half. I rolled out the marzipan and draped it over the cake, an extremely satisfying process because it covered the whole mess in a smooth surface—the equivalent of stuffing the cake into Spanx.

sarah jampel spinach cake 4

Photo by Chelsie Craig

If an even marzipan cover hides all the mistakes, did they even ever happen?

The final step: fondant. Since I followed a different recipe entirely (forgive me, God), I had no problems. I poured the mixture—melted white chocolate, corn syrup, confectioners’ sugar, water, and leftover spinach water—over the cake and watched it drip down the surface and over the sides in thick ribbons. Now the cake wasn’t only smooth—it was also shiny. The one thing it wasn’t? Very green. The white chocolate muted the spinach’s green into something just shy of white, like the color of my sneakers after one day of wear.

sarah jampel spinach cake 3

Photo by Chelsie Craig

Pouring the fondant over top. It should’ve been a vibrant green but, instead, leaned towards off-white.

Thankfully, festooned with pansies and $50-per-pound Sicilian pistachios, it actually looked presentable. I wouldn’t have been so ashamed to bring it to the judges’ tables.

The part where we eat it

The cake sliced nicely: There was a layer of fondant and a layer of marzipan followed by a mash of sponge cake and buttercream.

Chris Morocco gave it one look and decided he wouldn’t deign to taste it: Génoise, he told me, was meant to rise, then be sliced into beautifully discrete layers. Chris, I said to myself (because I would never actually talk back to Chris), I was just (kind of sort of) following the recipe!!! Would the génoise have been fluffier, taller, prouder had I used Natasha Pickowicz’s extremely detailed recipe? Why, yes! Did the GBBS bakers have the knowledge and wherewithal to skip Prue’s instructions and go with what they knew to be a better technique? Clearly! With episodes that jump between nearly a dozen contestants, how the heck was I supposed to grasp the sort of wizardry going down when the cameras cut away?

sarah jampel spinach cake 1

Photo by Chelsie Craig, Food Styling by Sarah Jampel

It’s not so bad but, hey, where are the layers?

But Morocco missed out. Because it tasted…fine! The extreme amount of buttercream in comparison to sponge produced a sweet, tender, and not-at-all dry effect. The marzipan was pleasantly chewy, and the fondant, since it was mostly white chocolate and corn syrup, was candy-like. People liked it! It was nutty and lemony, with no detectable spinach. Some folks at the office even asked to take slices home. Maybe my cake, with its short stature, ill-defined layers, and dirty-white hue, wouldn’t have placed high in terms of looks, but it got the flavor down pat. It lost the swimsuit competition but won the talent segment.

So what did I learn, besides the fact that television is deceptive and that spinach is a suitable but stinky natural food coloring? Well, as much as people say baking is about precision, that’s only true if you’re following a recipe you trust. As soon as you sense that something isn’t right—like that sponge cake isn’t going to work if you pour hot butter directly into whipped eggs or that the dough is lumpy when it really should be smooth—that’s when baking becomes about instincts and improvisation. Those contestants aren’t just good bakers, they’re forward-thinking problem-solvers.

And on that note, I also learned that I won’t be tossing my hat into the GBBS ring any time soon.



Source link

قالب وردپرس

Santé Et Nutrition

La sensation de membre fantôme enfin expliquée

admin

Published

on

By

Après une amputation, il n’est pas rare de parler de membre fantôme pour évoquer les douleurs et sensations ressenties alors que le membre n’est plus. Une nouvelle étude scientifique a permis d’élucider ce phénomène.

Pour évoquer les sensations et douleurs ressenties par les personnes amputées en lieu et place de leur main, bras ou encore jambe, on parle communément de membre fantôme. Mais au niveau nerveux et musculaire, le phénomène est encore difficile à expliquer.

Une nouvelle étude, parue le 21 février dans le revue Scientific Reports, a permis d’éclaircir ce phénomène méconnu. Elle suggère qu’après une amputation d’un membre, les zones du cerveau responsables du mouvement et des sensations de ce membre modifient leur communication fonctionnelle. Une nouvelle manifestation de la plasticité cérébrale, ou capacité du cerveau à se remodeler au cours de la vie en fonction des circonstances et événements perturbateurs.

Les chercheurs ont ici procédé à des examens cérébraux de personnes ayant subi l’amputation d’un membre inférieur. A l’aide d’IRM, ils ont constaté que le cerveau réagissait de manière excessive lorsque le moignon du patient était touché. Ils ont également constaté que le corps calleux, structure du cerveau reliant les zones du cortex responsables du mouvement et des sensations, perdait de sa force chez les personnes amputées.

En comparant les différences de communication entre zones cérébrales chez neuf amputés et chez neuf personnes “saines”, les chercheurs ont pu constater que les zones du cerveau responsables du mouvement et des sensations présentaient un schéma de communication anormal entre les hémisphères cérébraux droit et gauche chez les personnes amputées lorsque le moignon était touché, par rapport aux volontaires non-amputés. Cette communication anormale entre les deux hémisphères serait probablement due à une altération du corps calleux du cerveau.

Les modifications cérébrales en réponse à l’amputation font l’objet d’études depuis des années chez les patients signalant une douleur au membre fantôme. Cependant, nos résultats montrent qu’il existe un déséquilibre fonctionnel même en l’absence de douleur, chez les patients ne signalant que des sensations fantômes”, a expliqué Ivanei Bramati, doctorante à l’Université fédérale de Rio de Janeiro (Brésil) et principale auteure de l’étude.

Pour l’équipe de recherche, cette meilleure compréhension des modifications des réseaux de neurones suite à une amputation pourront conduire au développement de nouveaux traitements et dispositifs permettant de soulager la douleur ou la gêne des amputés quant à leur membre fantôme.

Notons par ailleurs que, de par l’essor des prothèses reliées au cerveau, la nécessité pour les amputés d’essayer de faire le deuil de leur membre fantôme n’est plus vraiment d’actualité.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Marseille: Des chercheurs vont bientôt tester le cannabis thérapeutique contre la maladie de Parkinson

admin

Published

on

By

Marseille, à la pointe sur le cannabis. Sur le cannabis thérapeutique plus exactement puisque les équipes de DHUNE, un centre d’excellence pour les maladies neurodégénératives, et l’association France Parkinson, lancent en partenariat deux études sur les effets de cette substance sur la maladie de Parkinson.

Une première étude vise à étudier les effets de deux principes actifs du cannabis, le tétrahydrocannabinol (THC) et le cannabidiol (CBD), sur les symptômes de la maladie de Parkinson, chez le rat. « Nous avons obtenu les financements et le feu vert des autorités pour lancer cette première étude. Elle devrait débuter dans les prochaines semaines », explique le professeur Alexandre Eusebio, du pôle neurosciences cliniques à l’Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille (APHM).

Une seconde étude chez l’homme

La seconde étude est très attendue puisqu’elle tend à étudier également les effets du THC et du CBD sur les symptômes de la maladie de Parkinson, mais cette fois, chez l’homme. Si elle a connu un certain retentissement médiatique, l’étude, menée par l’équipe de chercheurs composée également de Jean Philippe Azulay, chef du service neurologie à la Timone, Olivier Blin, responsable de Dhune, et Christelle Baunez, directrice de recherche au CNRS, n’a pas encore reçu le feu vert des autorités. « Cela ne diffère pas des protocoles classiques, nous devons fournir des informations sur la faisabilité de l’étude, ainsi que sur la sécurité des personnes testées », détaille Alexandre Eusebio.

Si les autorisations sont accordées, il s’agirait de la première étude sur les effets du cannabis chez les malades de Parkinson en France. Une première, alors même que la question du cannabis thérapeutique agite souvent les débats, quand 21 pays européens ont déjà légalisé son usage.

Des données existent, mais ne permettent pas l’interprétation

« L’efficacité des cannabinoïdes comme agents thérapeutiques dans divers troubles neurologiques tels que la spasticité, ou l’épilepsie a déjà été montrée. Des études expérimentales suggèrent que certains de ses composés, notamment le THC et le CBD auraient un potentiel effet neuroprotecteur ainsi qu’un effet sur les symptômes parkinsoniens », explique l’équipe de chercheurs. Des données existent, mais la méthodologie de ces études ne permet pas une interprétation assez fiable. D’où ces nouveaux travaux.

S’ils reçoivent le feu vert des autorités, les chercheurs testeront 30 patients, souffrant de la maladie de Parkinson, en leur administrant du cannabis par inhalation.

« Nous recruterons des personnes qui ont déjà été exposées au cannabis, il n’est pas envisageable éthiquement d’exposer des malades qui n’en ont jamais consommé. Durant deux jours d’hospitalisation, nous leur administrerons soit du cannabis, soit un placebo, et nous étudierons ensuite les effets sur les symptômes de la maladie », précise Alexandre Eusebio.

Pour l’instant, la méthodologie n’est pas encore définitivement arrêtée, elle pourrait être modifiée à la demande des autorités. Mais l’équipe de recherche sur les effets du cannabis espère pouvoir lancer l’étude d’ici la fin d’année 2019, voire début 2020.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Les emballages sont l’essentiel de la pollution plastique

admin

Published

on

By

Deux chercheurs commentent le plan annoncé par l’Etat et des industriels pour limiter la pollution aux déchets plastiques.

La France entame un sevrage de son addiction aux plastiques. Le ministère de la Transition écologique a dévoilé, jeudi, un « pacte » avec plusieurs entreprises et ONG visant à lutter contre la pollution découlant de l’usage de ce matériau. Les signataires s’engagent par exemple à abandonner le PVC dans les emballages ménagers ou industriels d’ici 2022, à « éliminer les autres emballages problématiques d’ici 2025 », et à rendre « réutilisables ou recyclables à 100% ces contenants » d’ici là.

Deux experts commentent, pour L’Express, les mesures prises : Maria-Luiza Pedrotti est chercheuse à l’Institut de la Mer de Villefranche (CNRS / Sorbonne Université) et coordinatrice scientifique de l’expédition Tara, qui a recueilli et analysé les microplastiques en Méditerranée. Mikael Kedzierski travaille à l’Institut de recherche Dupuy de Lôme (CNRS / Université Bretagne Sud). Il s’intéresse à l’impact des particules sur la santé et sur l’environnement.

Mikael Kedzierski : J’étudie la pollution par les micro-plastiques, des déchets sous forme de particules dont la taille reste inférieure à 5 millimètres, souvent visibles sur la plage ou en mer. La majorité de cette pollution provient en fait des emballages, bouteilles ou morceaux de films plastiques. Si les organismes vivants savent dégrader progressivement les déchets en bois ou les algues mortes, leur capacité à s’en prendre aux plastiques est beaucoup plus réduite. Alors ces plastiques persistent dans le milieu naturel, de plusieurs décennies à plusieurs siècles. Et une fois en mer, il est coûteux de les retirer. La solution la plus pertinente reste encore de bloquer cette pollution avant qu’elle ne l’atteigne.

Maria-Luiza Pedrotti : Les plastiques représentent un danger potentiel pour toute la chaîne alimentaire marine, jusqu’à l’homme. Or depuis 1950, nos sociétés ont produit 8,3 milliards de tonnes de plastique. Il faut parvenir à diminuer voire stopper cette production, car on ne pourra pas nettoyer les océans. Les Etats sont conscients du problème, mais de là à passer aux vraies mesures, c’est un défi.

Maria-Luiza Pedrotti : Sur le papier, ce sont d’excellentes mesures, assez ambitieuses pour mener de front ce combat. Mais je suis toujours partagée entre ma casquette de scientifique et celle d’activiste : si ces décisions ne sont pas accompagnées et sans contraintes, l’industrie et les commerçants ne suivront pas. Regardez, par exemple, combien est peu appliquée l’interdiction des sachets plastique à usage unique sur les marchés… D’autre part, il faudrait de telles mesures coordonnées pour tous les pays, sinon cela va être compliqué d’éradiquer cette pollution : la mer n’a pas de frontières.

Mikael Kedzierski : La France n’est pas très en avance sur la question, par rapport à d’autres pays européens comme les Scandinaves, en particulier sur les questions de recyclage. Certes, ce plan annoncé va forcément avoir un impact positif pour le pays. Reste qu’au niveau international, les principales sources du plastique des océans sont les pays en développement… Toutefois il faut noter que la France et de nombreux autres pays exportent aussi une partie de leurs déchets plastiques vers ces régions, notamment en Asie, et sont donc tout aussi responsables de cette pollution globale.

Maria-Luiza Pedrotti : Cela reste un problème chez les industriels, pour qui le plastique recyclé coûte 30 % plus cher que le plastique vierge. Les plastiques à usage unique sont les plus dangereux parce qu’ils ne sont pas rentables à recycler, en particulier le polystyrène expansé (PSE). Et en amont, il faut aussi regarder les systèmes de collecte. Depuis 2003, l’Allemagne a un système de consigne intéressant : le prix des contenants comprend une caution, à récupérer en le rapportant. Cela coûte 8 centimes pour une canette, 15 pour une bouteille en plastique et 25 pour un contenant non recyclable. Résultat : le taux de collecte atteint maintenant 90 %.

Mikael Kedzierski : Sur l’efficacité du recyclage, le plastique pourrait surtout être réutilisé une dizaine de fois sans que ses propriétés techniques ne soient vraiment dégradées. Sa légèreté, sa résistance et son faible coût sont justement la raison pour laquelle il fait partie de notre quotidien. Sauf qu’on ne l’utilise que sur des temps très courts – surtout les emballages – de quelques jours à quelques mois, avant d’en faire un déchet. Un plastique peut pourtant avoir plusieurs vies.

Continue Reading

Chat

Actualités3 semaines ago

Recensement: Statistique Canada révise sa question sur l’origine ethnique

Actualités3 semaines ago

Pénurie d’infirmières: le gouvernement dévoile sa stratégie

Actualités3 semaines ago

Commerce.Au Canada, les vins des colonies israéliennes ne peuvent plus porter la mention “Produit d’Israël”

Actualités3 semaines ago

Le Bloc québécois, plus nécessaire que jamais

Uncategorized3 semaines ago

Les clients de Desjardins, pas les bienvenus partout

Actualités3 semaines ago

« Ce climat de violence est inacceptable » : les députés LRM inquiets après de nouvelles dégradations de permanences

Actualités3 semaines ago

Hyundai enquêtera sur l’explosion d’une Kona EV électrique à Montréal

Actualités3 semaines ago

Statistique Canada revoit sa question sur l’origine ethnique dans le recensement

Actualités3 semaines ago

Quelles mesures du Ceta sont mauvaises pour l’environnement ?

Actualités3 semaines ago

Déjà une demande d’action collective déposée contre Capital One au Québec

Actualités3 semaines ago

Le quart des Albertains prêts à quitter le pays

Actualités3 semaines ago

Le Canada devra intégrer le concept de finance durable pour assurer sa croissance

Arts Et Spectacles1 mois ago

Des croupiers de casinos de Vancouver congédiés pour tricherie et complot

Actualités2 mois ago

Table ronde d’actualité internationale Royaume-(dés)Uni cherche nouveau leader

Actualités2 mois ago

Economie.Libra, nouvelle monnaie virtuelle et bras armé de Facebook

Actualités2 mois ago

Vers un capitalisme vert ? De très gros investisseurs internationaux dénoncent plus de 700 grandes entreprises, dont 39 françaises, pour défaut de politiques environnementales

Actualités2 mois ago

Les États-Unis publient de nouvelles photos contre l’Iran et déploient 1000 soldats dans la région

Actualités2 mois ago

Magnifique Society 2019 : un festival rémois aux ambitions internationales

Actualités2 mois ago

La France dénonce «l’annexion» de la Crimée par la Russie, Moscou lui rappelle le cas de Mayotte

Actualités2 mois ago

Simon Laplace : «les Français éprouvent une certaine tendresse pour Jacques Chirac»

Anglais9 mois ago

Body found after downtown Lethbridge apartment building fire, police investigating – Lethbridge

Styles De Vie10 mois ago

Salon du chocolat 2018: les 5 temps forts

Anglais8 mois ago

27 CP Rail cars derail near Lake Louise, Alta.

Anglais8 mois ago

Man facing eviction from family home on Toronto Islands gets reprieve — for now

Santé Et Nutrition10 mois ago

Gluten-Free Muffins

Santé Et Nutrition9 mois ago

We Try Kin Euphorics and How to REALLY Get the Glow | Healthyish

Anglais7 mois ago

This B.C. woman’s recipe is one of the most popular of all time — and the story behind it is bananas

Anglais6 mois ago

A photo taken on Toronto’s Corso Italia 49 years ago became a family legend. No one saw it — until now

Styles De Vie11 mois ago

Renaud Capuçon, rédacteur en chef du Figaroscope

Mode8 mois ago

Paris : chez Cécile Roederer co-fondatrice de Smallable

Anglais9 mois ago

Ontario Tories argue Trudeau’s carbon plan is ‘unconstitutional’

Anglais9 mois ago

Trudeau government would reject Jason Kenney, taxpayers group in carbon tax court fight

Anglais11 mois ago

Condo developer Thomas Liu — who collected millions but hasn’t built anything — loses court fight with Town of Ajax

Anglais7 mois ago

This couple shares a 335-square-foot micro condo on Queen St. — and loves it

Anglais9 mois ago

100 years later, Montreal’s Black Watch regiment returns to Wallers, France

Anglais7 mois ago

Province’s push for private funding, additional stops puts Scarborough subway at risk of delays

Technologie6 mois ago

YouTube recommande de la pornographie juvénile, allègue un internaute

Styles De Vie7 mois ago

Ford Ranger Raptor, le pick-up roule des mécaniques

Styles De Vie7 mois ago

quel avenir pour le Carré des Horlogers?

Styles De Vie7 mois ago

Le Michelin salue le dynamisme de la gastronomie française

Trending