Connect with us

Santé Et Nutrition

How CBD Chocolate Changed My Life After I Was Diagnosed with Breast Cancer | Healthyish

Published

on

[ad_1]

I have always had the unholy ability to work unrelenting hours. I could open and close restaurants, pull 30-hour shifts with a broken leg, turn chaotic kitchens into well-oiled machines. I could do it because I love food, and more than that, I love the people who make food their profession, who give so much of themselves to create and share meals with perfect strangers. I love the guests, the farmers, the spice merchants, even the critics. This kind of deep-seated dedication can sometimes make a person feel she has supernatural powers. Like she’s unstoppable even. Until one day she isn’t.

My cooking career began at age 17. I worked in cafés, apprenticed under a French pastry chef in Florida, studied in France, ran the opening corporate pastry program for all of Ford Fry’s restaurants in Atlanta, helped design the menu for the Tate Modern’s restaurant in London. I became obsessed with chocolate and opened an underground confection shop called Sugar-Coated Radical, then closed it down after a robbery and shifted my focus to savory. By August 2017 I was working as culinary director for Atlanta’s Ladybird Grove & Mess Hall—developing menus, hiring staff, creating a training manual—when suddenly the executive chef left and I was asked to take the role. Okay, I said. I can do this. Then came more executive chef roles for the joint opening of two new concepts from the same owner: Muchacho and Golden Eagle. Okay, I said again. I’m strong. I can handle this too. I can handle anything.

tariacamerino.jpg

Photo by Allie Royce Soble

Taria Camerino at the farmers’ market.

I’d ignored the pain under my arm for months, pushed through, kept quiet. I had a kitchen to run, two more to open, sons to raise, no time. But then one night, alone, drained of energy after a long day of work, I checked. Just check, Taria. That’s when I realized, it’s not my arm. It’s my breast.

When I discovered the lump, everything became transparent, even my own body. I knew something was wrong, but I didn’t know how to understand it. So, I went back to work. I opened the restaurants. I ignored the pain for another month. Until finally I couldn’t. “I don’t want to leave you,” I told my sous-chef as we pushed through dinner rush, 15 hours into my workday, “but if I don’t go home right now, I just might die.” It took another month to get an appointment with the doctor.

Mammogram. Ultrasound. Diagnosis. Breast cancer, Stage 1.

It’s a funny thing, being reminded of one’s own fragility. Especially in a restaurant kitchen, which is a hard place to be vulnerable. But I’ve always led with my vulnerability; that’s how I make food that’s poignant. And the good news was, we caught it early. So no surgery, no chemotherapy; just pills every day. “Whatever it takes, you gotta do this,” my staff told me.

Memory loss. Vertigo. Nausea. Seizures. A ministroke.

I was exhausted beyond comprehension. I had to leave my job. There was no position I could hold, and I’d lost my motivation to cook, even for my family. I couldn’t drive myself to the market or stand for longer than 30 minutes. Worst of all, I’d lost my sense of taste: produce picked that morning, fresh-baked bread—the taste had changed, weakened. What was the point of getting out of bed? I pulled inward, disappeared from everyone, unable to bear the thought of people seeing me so broken.

I’ll never work in restaurants again—my body won’t allow it. But now when people say how sorry they are that I got sick, I just smile.

Back when I was a 20-something pastry chef, working with chocolate every day was the norm. But it wasn’t until I went into chocolate-making full time that I discovered the power of sourcing. I remember the day it happened: A woman showed up at the door of my shop with a bag of cacao she’d grown on her ten-acre farm in Ecuador. “Could you use this?” she asked. It was raw and rough, not viable by American standards. But I opened the bag, just to smell it, to take a little taste.

I got light-headed. This was like nothing I had ever experienced: hibiscus, goat’s milk, sunset, fresh rain. I tasted life. “It’s funny you say that,” she replied. “At the farm, we sit under the hibiscus flowers and watch the sunset every evening.”

I spent the next 15 years traveling the world, working with any chocolate I could get my hands on. Cacao orchards in Vietnam, micro-farms in El Salvador. Sleeping on sidewalks and floors, spending all I had in the pursuit of more knowledge and more chocolate. In Japan I studied wagashi, traditional sweets made from plant-based ingredients and served with tea, with one of the world’s few female wagashi masters. I used cacao in my creations, despite my teacher’s insisting it was not traditional. Boiled adzuki beans sweetened with sugar, mochi, rice flour—those were the norm. Not cacao.

Eventually I managed to change her mind with the care I took in sourcing, the spiritual nature of my approach. She asked me to teach her how to work with chocolate, and we spent hours each day touching, tasting, grinding. The aroma filled the kitchen, permeated our living quarters. We went to bed with the scent of cacao, and we woke to it.

When I returned home in 2013, I was changed. More human, more whole. Developing a relationship to people by way of their cuisine is the most profound way to know them.

Fast-forward to 2018, five months after the diagnosis. I’d opted to try an intensive dose of CBD, 1,000 milligrams a day, along with the pills the doctor prescribed. It was working, or starting to, enough that I could dabble in the kitchen again—baking simple things like cookies and brownies. Then one morning I woke up with a realization. I needed to make chocolate again. I needed to smell it, to taste it, to be in a room surrounded by it.

Luckily I happen to have one of these rooms in my house. Eight feet by 12, piled with chocolate from all over the world. The room had sat unused for months as I lay in bed. But that morning I returned, started to explore again. What if I mixed the chocolate with the CBD? Worth a try. I was already making CBD tinctures and extractions, combining them with adaptogens like ashwagandha and valerian: herbs and roots with medicinal properties that Chinese and Ayurvedic healers have used for centuries. Why not combine them with chocolate?

I started by grinding the cacao into a paste for ganache. Raw agave for sweetness. Cocoa butter for creaminess. The going was slow, just a few hours a day rather than my usual 16, but the process was the same: crack, grind, temper, mold. It took four tries to get it right, but when I did, a revelation: a bittersweet dance between cacao and agave, like a kiss from Ixcacao, the goddess herself. A spread-on-toast kind of medicine.

It’s the process—it’s using my hands again—that’s bringing me back to life. I can see crystals forming and moving and shifting as I temper the chocolate, raising and lowering its temperature. These crystals become my body. I am healing. I am feeling like myself again, which tends to make me feel invincible. You know, like I can do anything. Even beat cancer.

Today my cancer is in remission. And my little chocolate-meets-CBD experiment went pretty well. People were interested; they asked for samples—ganache and tinctures and mints—then came back offering money for more.

Logo. Website. Packaging. Production.

Five weeks later I had a company. When you’ve spent your life running restaurants, you know how to work systems. The night of the launch, I left exhausted but feeling like I’d found a reason to be alive, to stay alive. I named the company Alchimique because this process is a manipulation of the elements: of many things becoming another thing. A thing that never existed before. A thing that’s strong enough to heal even me.

This illness has taken permanent shape in my body: weight gain, distortion, pain. I no longer move in the same way, speak in the same way. I’ll never work in large-scale restaurants again—my body won’t allow it. But now when people say how sorry they are that I got sick, I just smile. I tell them how, strange as it may seem, this sickness has brought me home, to my most precious place. I get to make chocolate every day, and it is magic.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Santé Et Nutrition

Démystifier la dyslexie

Published

on

By

(EN) Les enfants entament une nouvelle année scolaire au cours de laquelle ils vont se faire des amis, s’adapter à leurs nouveaux enseignants et faire face à de nouveaux défis. Certains d’entre eux auront plus de difficultés que d’autres, mais comment savoir si un trouble d’apprentissage ne nuit pas à votre enfant et à sa capacité de réussir ?

L’un des troubles les plus fréquents est la dyslexie. Environ 15 % des Canadiens en sont atteints et pourtant, selon une étude récente, moins d’un tiers d’entre nous serait capable d’en reconnaître les signes.

Bien que la dyslexie ne se guérisse pas, il est possible de la contrôler grâce à une détection précoce et à un enseignement adéquat. C’est pourquoi il est important de pouvoir reconnaître la dyslexie.

Voici ce qu’il faut savoir :

Qu’est-ce que c’est ? La dyslexie est un trouble d’apprentissage qui se caractérise par des difficultés à identifier les sons produits en parlant et à reconnaître les lettres, les mots et les chiffres. Le cerveau interprète mal les sons, les lettres et les chiffres quand il les assemble et en arrive souvent à tout mélanger, ce qui est déroutant pour la personne. La dyslexie touche tout le monde de la même façon, sans considération de genre et peu importe le milieu socio-économique ou l’origine ethnique de la personne.

Que peut-on faire ? Si vous pensez que votre enfant peut être dyslexique, n’attendez pas pour réagir. Il existe de nombreux tests à passer en ligne qui peuvent vous aider à l’identifier. Si vous croyez que c’est le cas, demandez à accéder à des ressources supplémentaires à votre école ou communiquez avec un tuteur spécialisé en littératie structurée. Faites appel à des groupes d’entraide pour en apprendre davantage.

Comment favoriser la réussite ? « Ce n’est pas parce qu’une personne a reçu un diagnostic de trouble d’apprentissage qu’elle ne peut pas réussir dans la vie. Ses apprentissages se font tout simplement d’une manière différente », explique Christine Staley, directrice générale de Dyslexia Canada. « Une détection précoce et un enseignement adéquat en lecture sont essentiels pour contrôler la dyslexie et ouvrir la voie à un brillant avenir. »

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Les extincteurs portatifs améliorent la sécurité à domicile

Published

on

By

(EN) Lorsqu’un incendie se déclare, chaque seconde compte. S’ils sont utilisés rapidement et de façon efficace, les extincteurs de feu portatifs peuvent aider à sauver des vies. C’est pourquoi ils font partie de ces éléments importants qui permettent d’assurer votre sécurité et celle de votre famille à domicile.

Suivez ces conseils concernant la façon d’utiliser un extincteur de feu et le meilleur endroit pour l’installer afin d’être prêt en cas d’urgence :

Comparez les caractéristiques. Choisissez un extincteur résidentiel doté d’une goupille de métal et d’un levier de commande, aussi durable qu’un extincteur de qualité commerciale, ainsi que d’un manomètre à code couleur facile à lire afin de vous assurer que l’appareil est chargé. Sachez qu’il n’est pas sécuritaire d’utiliser un extincteur qui a déjà été déchargé, surtout qu’il existe maintenant des extincteurs rechargeables qui peuvent être rechargés par un professionnel certifié si vous avez utilisé l’appareil.

Sachez comment vous en servir : Tous les extincteurs de feu sont vendus avec des instructions d’utilisation. Toutefois, plus de 70 % des consommateurs qui possèdent un extincteur affirment ne pas se sentir à l’aise de le faire fonctionner. Solution pratique et conviviale, le pulvérisateur d’incendie First Alert est une bombe aérosol au design simple qui constitue un dispositif supplémentaire efficace pour les incendies domestiques. Grâce à une buse précise qui permet de pulvériser sur une grande surface, l’utilisateur peut mieux contrôler l’application. De plus, comme il n’y a pas de goupille à tirer ni de levier à serrer, il est possible d’éteindre un incendie rapidement.

Gardez à portée de la main : Lorsque chaque seconde compte, il est essentiel d’avoir un extincteur de feu à proximité afin de réagir rapidement. Il est préférable de placer un extincteur à chaque étage de la maison et dans les pièces où le risque d’incendie est plus élevé, comme la cuisine et le garage. La National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) recommande d’installer des extincteurs à la sortie des pièces afin de les décharger et de vous sauver rapidement par la suite si l’incendie ne peut être maîtrisé.

Sachez quand quitter la maison. Une des composantes d’un plan d’intervention en cas d’incendie consiste à essayer d’éteindre un petit incendie avec un extincteur de feu, mais l’objectif principal doit être l’évacuation de la famille en toute sécurité. Un extincteur n’est pas un substitut à la mise en place d’un plan d’évacuation résidentielle en cas d’incendie, qui doit être pratiqué régulièrement, ni à l’installation d’avertisseurs de fumée fonctionnels dans toute la maison – un à chaque étage et dans chaque chambre, afin de permettre la détection rapide d’un incendie.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Comment aider un bébé à développer son goût

Published

on

By

(EN) Un bébé qui n’est pas encouragé à manger une variété d’aliments dès son plus jeune âge aura de fortes chances à devenir un enfant difficile qui n’acceptera que ses plats préférés, comme des croquettes de poulet ou des hotdogs.

Pour faire en sorte que votre bébé soit ouvert et enthousiaste lorsque vient le moment d’essayer de nouveaux aliments, Nanny Robina, l’une des plus grandes expertes en matière d’éducation des enfants au Canada, vous propose des conseils pour faire de votre un enfant un gourmet aventureux :

  • Offrez de la variété. Restez constants et introduisez autant de nouveaux aliments que possible, ainsi que des collations colorées et attrayantes.  Offrir au bébé une variété de saveurs et de textures et même des aliments qui fondent facilement dans la bouche est un excellent moyen de s’assurer qu’il demeure ouvert à une variété d’options.
  • Mangez avec lui. Asseyez-vous près de votre bébé et mangez à côté de lui. Les enfants imitent souvent ce qu’ils voient, alors manger avec eux et leur montrer à quel point vous appréciez le repas en lançant quelques exclamations du type « Hummm! C’est vraiment bon! » peut avoir d’excellentes répercussions. Nanny Robina ajoute que leur donner des collations faciles à saisir, comme des barres tendres faciles à mâcher, est une autre façon de les encourager à essayer des nouveautés et à manger seuls.
  • Soyez patients. Les goûts de votre bébé sont peut-être limités et difficiles à élargir, mais poursuivez son éducation sans baisser les bras. Il est utile de toujours avoir quelques options prêtes à manger sous la main comme les fondants de smoothie PC Biologique : Ils fondent facilement dans la bouche et sont offerts en deux délicieuses saveurs, dont banane, mangue et fruit de la passion, puis banane et fraise.
Continue Reading

Chat

Anglais4 semaines ago

12 strategies to manage credit card payments and debt

Affaires1 mois ago

Prudence avec le passeport vaccinal

Affaires1 mois ago

Le secteur touristique autochtone s’attendait à beaucoup plus du budget fédéral

Affaires1 mois ago

La fintech canadienne Mogo ajoute 146 autres Ethereum à son portefeuille de crypto

Affaires1 mois ago

Les entreprises canadiennes estiment que l’épuisement professionnel nuira au résultat net des entreprises cette année, selon une nouvelle étude de Sage au Canada

Affaires1 mois ago

Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les matériaux de construction multifonctionnels durables

Affaires1 mois ago

Les Canadiens seront vaccinés

Affaires1 mois ago

Samsung Canada et Tim Hortons poursuivent la transformation numérique des services au volant en prévoyant la mise en place de 2 600 écrans extérieurs dans tout le Canada d’ici la fin de 2021.

Affaires1 mois ago

Le Canada mise sur le nucléaire pour réduire les GES

Affaires1 mois ago

Les mesures sanitaires font reculer les ventes de Tim Hortons

Affaires1 mois ago

L’Université de Montréal a caché un laboratoire nucléaire pendant la guerre

Affaires1 mois ago

Économie : les postes vacants coûtent 8 M $ par jour au secteur de la transformation alimentaire

Opinions1 mois ago

J’ai peur du projet de loi 59

Opinions1 mois ago

La protection de nos enfants, c’est aussi l’affaire du municipal

Opinions1 mois ago

Crise du logement : le Parti libéral du Québec en mode solutions

Opinions1 mois ago

Des témoins condamnent le comportement de certains députés envers elles

Opinions1 mois ago

Québec solidaire demande à ses membres de se prononcer sur une faction du parti

Opinions1 mois ago

Chevaliers de la «libarté»

Opinions1 mois ago

Se taire ou faire usage de sa liberté d’expression citoyenne?

Opinions1 mois ago

Contrer les féminicides: de la considération à la préoccupation!

Anglais3 années ago

Body found after downtown Lethbridge apartment building fire, police investigating – Lethbridge

Styles De Vie3 années ago

Salon du chocolat 2018: les 5 temps forts

Anglais2 années ago

This B.C. woman’s recipe is one of the most popular of all time — and the story behind it is bananas

Santé Et Nutrition3 années ago

Gluten-Free Muffins

Anglais2 années ago

27 CP Rail cars derail near Lake Louise, Alta.

Anglais2 années ago

Man facing eviction from family home on Toronto Islands gets reprieve — for now

Santé Et Nutrition3 années ago

We Try Kin Euphorics and How to REALLY Get the Glow | Healthyish

Anglais2 années ago

Ontario’s Tories hope Ryan Gosling video will keep supporters from breaking up with the party

Anglais2 années ago

A photo taken on Toronto’s Corso Italia 49 years ago became a family legend. No one saw it — until now

Anglais3 années ago

Condo developer Thomas Liu — who collected millions but hasn’t built anything — loses court fight with Town of Ajax

Styles De Vie3 années ago

Renaud Capuçon, rédacteur en chef du Figaroscope

Anglais2 années ago

This couple shares a 335-square-foot micro condo on Queen St. — and loves it

Mode2 années ago

Paris : chez Cécile Roederer co-fondatrice de Smallable

Anglais3 années ago

Ontario Tories argue Trudeau’s carbon plan is ‘unconstitutional’

Styles De Vie2 années ago

Ford Ranger Raptor, le pick-up roule des mécaniques

Affaires2 années ago

Le Forex devient de plus en plus accessible aux débutants

Anglais3 années ago

100 years later, Montreal’s Black Watch regiment returns to Wallers, France

Anglais3 années ago

Trudeau government would reject Jason Kenney, taxpayers group in carbon tax court fight

Technologie2 années ago

YouTube recommande de la pornographie juvénile, allègue un internaute

Anglais2 années ago

Province’s push for private funding, additional stops puts Scarborough subway at risk of delays

Trending