Connect with us

Santé Et Nutrition

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Learned Her Most Important Lessons from Restaurants

Published

on

[ad_1]

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez orders a pastrami taco, hold the guac. It’s a cloudy Monday in late August and we’re sitting at a four-top near the back of Flats Fix, a narrow Manhattan taqueria sidled up next to Union Square. This isn’t just another random interview-in-a-quiet-restaurant selection, though—and not just because this place isn’t quiet.

Until last February, Ocasio-Cortez spent most of her days working here, slinging tequila-based cocktails and living off tips from the happy hour crowd. Everyone knows her: the servers, the bartenders, the cooks, the regulars. “I haven’t been back in awhile,” she tells me, as yet another former coworker comes up for a hug. “Things have been a little crazy.”

Yes. A little crazy.

Last night Ocasio-Cortez became the youngest woman ever elected to Congress. But on the day of our interview, she’s still processing the reality of having trounced the 14th District’s powerhouse incumbent Joseph Crowley in the Democratic primary. Crowley had been in politics since before she was born, repped the district unopposed since 2013. Ocasio-Cortez, a 29-year-old self-described Democratic Socialist of Puerto Rican descent, didn’t even have a Wikipedia page. Her campaign spent just over 5 percent of what Crowley’s did. And yet, on June 26, 2018, she beat him by more than 14 percentage points and rocketed into the national spotlight; not just as an unexpected victor who proved all the polls wrong, but as a shining light for progressives—and especially young people of color.

Here at Flats Fix, with its a zigzag of fluorescent lights and trip-hop playlist and giant yellow surfboard affixed to the wall, she’s taking a moment to reflect.

“My campaign started in food, and in a lot of ways evolved out of food,” she tells me, motioning toward the wooden counter that runs the length of the restaurant, the bottles of José Cuervo and Patron stacked on shelves strung with red fairy lights and South American flags. “For 80 percent of this campaign, I operated out of a paper grocery bag hidden behind that bar.” Between shifts at the restaurant, she’d reach into the bag for her political literature and a change of clothes, then set out to canvass.

She leans across the table, her jean jacket buttoned all the way up, her large brown eyes intense, magnetic. “For me it was especially potent that I was working in the food service industry while running for office because I wasn’t, like, reminiscing on some summer job I had when I was a teenager. This was the life I was living.”

For Ocasio-Cortez, food is political, and the most tangible indicator of our social inequities. Sure, as living beings we all must eat to survive—and there’s unity in that—but what we eat and how much and where it comes from and what we must do to get it varies widely. “The food industry is the nexus of almost all of the major forces in our politics today,” she says. “It’s super closely linked with climate change and ethics. It’s the nexus of minimum wage fights, of immigration law, of criminal justice reform, of health care debates, of education. You’d be hard-pressed to find a political issue that doesn’t have food implications.”

Most politicians, she points out, are disconnected from these realities. At the start of this Congress, the median net worth of members across both parties was five times that of an American household. “Many members of Congress were born into wealth, or they grew up around it,” Ocasio-Cortez says. “How can you legislate a better life for working people if you’ve never been a working person? Try living with the anxiety of not having health insurance for three years when your tooth starts to hurt. It’s this existential dread. I have that perspective. I feel like I understand what’s happening electorally because I have experienced it myself.”

alexandria ocasio cortes vintage pic

Courtesy of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez as a baby with her late father, Sergio Ocasio.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was born in the Bronx, the only child of Sergio, a Bronx-born architect, and Blanca, a Puerto Rican immigrant who cleaned houses and drove a bus to make ends meet. “We were poor, so I was used to eating rice and beans every day,” Ocasio-Cortez recalls. “Also—what do they call it in English? Cream of Wheat. I loved Cream of Wheat. With sugar.”

Every year for her parents’ anniversary, Sergio would dig up a traditional Puerto Rican roasting pit in the backyard and spend hours turning a whole pig on a spit until the meat was smoked crisp on the outside, juicy-tender on the inside. Those are some of her best memories.

When she was five, her family moved to a considerably more affluent suburb of Westchester County, New York, where the public schools were better. But that didn’t mean life got easy, she says. “The thing that people don’t realize is that wherever there is affluence, there’s an underclass. There’s a service class. And that’s what I grew up in, scrubbing toilets with my mom.” But the Ocasio-Cortez family found their place in the community, inviting employees of the local Dunkin’ Donuts over for Thanksgiving dinner, serving their turkey with pernil, a Puerto Rican–style roast pork shoulder bathed in tangy sofrito.

“My dad used to say that he collected people,” she recalls. “If you didn’t have a place to go on Thanksgiving, you came to our place. We never had a table big enough to fit everyone, but we’d always have folding chairs. You’d make a plate, eat it out of your lap, and share stories.”

She wanted to be a scientist when she grew up, but her first on-the-books job was at an Irish pub, at 15 or 16 years old, working as a hostess to pay for her extracurriculars. She’d split up the after-school hours: a few days a week working at the pub, a few taking the commuter rail into Manhattan to run experiments out of Mount Sinai Medical Center in Spanish Harlem. She was competitive, won second prize at the world’s largest pre-collegiate science fair, got a small asteroid named after her as a reward: the 23238 Ocasio-Cortez. Oh yeah, and she always loved cooking because: “That’s what it is. You know? It’s chemistry.”

As a freshman at Boston University, Ocasio-Cortez moved into pre-med housing. More science; that was the plan. But then she studied abroad in Niger, doing rotations at a maternity clinic on the outskirts of Niamey. The country, ranked last in the UN Human Development Index, was recovering from severe famine. “I saw a lot of pretty brutal things there,” she says, recalling babies born on steel tables covered in nothing but wax print cloth. Cemented in her mind is one particularly difficult pregnancy that resulted in a stillbirth: “The reason the child had passed was very preventable. For me it was a very powerful moment. This child’s life was literally decided because of where it was born.”

Suddenly the path she’d planned—medical school, becoming a doctor, having a family—no longer seemed like an option. “I couldn’t just go back home and lead a normal life,” she says. “I just…couldn’t.” Though she recognized the importance of individualized care, she wanted to go bigger, deeper, down to the dark roots of suffering. So she switched her major to economics and began to focus on policy—and in particular, the issues that affected her own community of working class people of color in the Bronx.

After graduation Ocasio-Cortez returned to New York where she was hired as an educational director at the National Hispanic Institute, a nonprofit serving Hispanic youth. But she also went back to the restaurant industry: bartending and waitressing were necessary to supplement her income, which she used to help her mother stay afloat after Sergio died of cancer. At restaurants, she worked side by side with immigrants both documented and undocumented. Their stories and experiences informed her work as a local organizer.

“For me what’s important is to value the hands that go into your food,” she says. “All of them.”

Credit Andy Hur 05112018 Business Walking Tour College Point 236

Photograph by Andy Hur

Ocasio-Cortez at a bodega in Queens, New York.

About one-third of the people working in the food-service industry are undocumented, with most holding the lowest-paying jobs, like bussing tables and dishwashing, according to a recent Pew Research Center study. In the agricultural industry, that number rises to more than half. As a result, restaurant kitchens, food-processing facilities, and commercial farms have been a frequent target for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) since it was formed in 2003. But after President Donald Trump took office in January 2017, raids and arrests surged, and not just in the food industry.

During the current administration’s first 100 days, ICE apprehended 41,318 immigrants, up 37.6 percent over the same period the year before, according to the agency. But arrests of immigrants with no criminal record represented the biggest statistical increase: that number more than doubled by the end of April 2017. And we have yet to see the results of more recent White House policies.

While these mandates aren’t the only factors contributing to the increasingly severe labor shortages reported at restaurants across the country, they certainly play a part, especially when coupled with ramped-up enforcement at the border. Between 2015 and 2017, the number of National Restaurant Association members reporting labor recruitment as their top challenge more than doubled.

“The tenor of working at Flats Fix became very different,” Ocasio-Cortez says. ICE never raided this particular restaurant, but the fear that they might permeated the kitchen. Immigrant workers, even many who were here legally, began quitting and returning to their countries of origin.

She recalls one long-term brunch chef, nicknamed “Grande,” who’d been at the diner next door (where she also worked) for 15 years. “He ran the line like clockwork,” she says. The Coffee Shop, as it was called, had once been an iconic New York City establishment, even a regular setting for Sex and the City. But after Grande returned to Mexico, the workers who were left couldn’t keep up with demand. “You can’t hire that back. That stuff takes years to perfect,” she continues. “Our kitchen got all messed up. We had to change our brunch menu because we couldn’t handle the same volume of orders anymore.”

Last month the Coffee Shop shut down.

06262018 CoreyTorpie ElectionNight 8

Photograph by Corey Torpie

Ocasio-Cortez celebrating her primary win.

Ocasio-Cortez’s platform is one built on her own life experiences. Her push for universal Medicare strikes a particular chord with the more than 85 percent of restaurant workers whose employers do not offer health insurance. Her proposed doubling of the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 addresses the income imbalances brought on by the tipping industry and the 40 percent of restaurant workers living in near poverty. Even her calls to abolish ICE tie in to the frequency with which immigrant restaurant workers are targeted.

“It’s one thing to put your head in the sand,” she says, “but it’s another to actively disrespect and hate the people who feed you. Because honestly, that’s what a lot of this anti-immigrant rhetoric is about. You’re hating the people who feed you, which is a pretty messed-up thing.”

It’s this conviction, perhaps, that allowed her to win a seemingly unwinnable primary, even as a young, unknown, and underfunded candidate. Taking a seat in the House of Representatives never seemed out of the question.

“Even when things looked their worst—like in January when it was just me and my partner in our apartment and I was bartending full-time while challenging one of the most powerful members of Congress—never did I feel like I didn’t have a shot,” she tells me. Her communications manager is signaling we’ve run out of time. “Because I’m an organizer. I’m on the ground. I know my community. We acknowledge that all this shit is stacked up against us, but we don’t get to give up. We don’t have the luxury.”

She pushes her chair back, gets up to go, her taco only half eaten.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Santé Et Nutrition

Démystifier la dyslexie

Published

on

By

(EN) Les enfants entament une nouvelle année scolaire au cours de laquelle ils vont se faire des amis, s’adapter à leurs nouveaux enseignants et faire face à de nouveaux défis. Certains d’entre eux auront plus de difficultés que d’autres, mais comment savoir si un trouble d’apprentissage ne nuit pas à votre enfant et à sa capacité de réussir ?

L’un des troubles les plus fréquents est la dyslexie. Environ 15 % des Canadiens en sont atteints et pourtant, selon une étude récente, moins d’un tiers d’entre nous serait capable d’en reconnaître les signes.

Bien que la dyslexie ne se guérisse pas, il est possible de la contrôler grâce à une détection précoce et à un enseignement adéquat. C’est pourquoi il est important de pouvoir reconnaître la dyslexie.

Voici ce qu’il faut savoir :

Qu’est-ce que c’est ? La dyslexie est un trouble d’apprentissage qui se caractérise par des difficultés à identifier les sons produits en parlant et à reconnaître les lettres, les mots et les chiffres. Le cerveau interprète mal les sons, les lettres et les chiffres quand il les assemble et en arrive souvent à tout mélanger, ce qui est déroutant pour la personne. La dyslexie touche tout le monde de la même façon, sans considération de genre et peu importe le milieu socio-économique ou l’origine ethnique de la personne.

Que peut-on faire ? Si vous pensez que votre enfant peut être dyslexique, n’attendez pas pour réagir. Il existe de nombreux tests à passer en ligne qui peuvent vous aider à l’identifier. Si vous croyez que c’est le cas, demandez à accéder à des ressources supplémentaires à votre école ou communiquez avec un tuteur spécialisé en littératie structurée. Faites appel à des groupes d’entraide pour en apprendre davantage.

Comment favoriser la réussite ? « Ce n’est pas parce qu’une personne a reçu un diagnostic de trouble d’apprentissage qu’elle ne peut pas réussir dans la vie. Ses apprentissages se font tout simplement d’une manière différente », explique Christine Staley, directrice générale de Dyslexia Canada. « Une détection précoce et un enseignement adéquat en lecture sont essentiels pour contrôler la dyslexie et ouvrir la voie à un brillant avenir. »

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Les extincteurs portatifs améliorent la sécurité à domicile

Published

on

By

(EN) Lorsqu’un incendie se déclare, chaque seconde compte. S’ils sont utilisés rapidement et de façon efficace, les extincteurs de feu portatifs peuvent aider à sauver des vies. C’est pourquoi ils font partie de ces éléments importants qui permettent d’assurer votre sécurité et celle de votre famille à domicile.

Suivez ces conseils concernant la façon d’utiliser un extincteur de feu et le meilleur endroit pour l’installer afin d’être prêt en cas d’urgence :

Comparez les caractéristiques. Choisissez un extincteur résidentiel doté d’une goupille de métal et d’un levier de commande, aussi durable qu’un extincteur de qualité commerciale, ainsi que d’un manomètre à code couleur facile à lire afin de vous assurer que l’appareil est chargé. Sachez qu’il n’est pas sécuritaire d’utiliser un extincteur qui a déjà été déchargé, surtout qu’il existe maintenant des extincteurs rechargeables qui peuvent être rechargés par un professionnel certifié si vous avez utilisé l’appareil.

Sachez comment vous en servir : Tous les extincteurs de feu sont vendus avec des instructions d’utilisation. Toutefois, plus de 70 % des consommateurs qui possèdent un extincteur affirment ne pas se sentir à l’aise de le faire fonctionner. Solution pratique et conviviale, le pulvérisateur d’incendie First Alert est une bombe aérosol au design simple qui constitue un dispositif supplémentaire efficace pour les incendies domestiques. Grâce à une buse précise qui permet de pulvériser sur une grande surface, l’utilisateur peut mieux contrôler l’application. De plus, comme il n’y a pas de goupille à tirer ni de levier à serrer, il est possible d’éteindre un incendie rapidement.

Gardez à portée de la main : Lorsque chaque seconde compte, il est essentiel d’avoir un extincteur de feu à proximité afin de réagir rapidement. Il est préférable de placer un extincteur à chaque étage de la maison et dans les pièces où le risque d’incendie est plus élevé, comme la cuisine et le garage. La National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) recommande d’installer des extincteurs à la sortie des pièces afin de les décharger et de vous sauver rapidement par la suite si l’incendie ne peut être maîtrisé.

Sachez quand quitter la maison. Une des composantes d’un plan d’intervention en cas d’incendie consiste à essayer d’éteindre un petit incendie avec un extincteur de feu, mais l’objectif principal doit être l’évacuation de la famille en toute sécurité. Un extincteur n’est pas un substitut à la mise en place d’un plan d’évacuation résidentielle en cas d’incendie, qui doit être pratiqué régulièrement, ni à l’installation d’avertisseurs de fumée fonctionnels dans toute la maison – un à chaque étage et dans chaque chambre, afin de permettre la détection rapide d’un incendie.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Comment aider un bébé à développer son goût

Published

on

By

(EN) Un bébé qui n’est pas encouragé à manger une variété d’aliments dès son plus jeune âge aura de fortes chances à devenir un enfant difficile qui n’acceptera que ses plats préférés, comme des croquettes de poulet ou des hotdogs.

Pour faire en sorte que votre bébé soit ouvert et enthousiaste lorsque vient le moment d’essayer de nouveaux aliments, Nanny Robina, l’une des plus grandes expertes en matière d’éducation des enfants au Canada, vous propose des conseils pour faire de votre un enfant un gourmet aventureux :

  • Offrez de la variété. Restez constants et introduisez autant de nouveaux aliments que possible, ainsi que des collations colorées et attrayantes.  Offrir au bébé une variété de saveurs et de textures et même des aliments qui fondent facilement dans la bouche est un excellent moyen de s’assurer qu’il demeure ouvert à une variété d’options.
  • Mangez avec lui. Asseyez-vous près de votre bébé et mangez à côté de lui. Les enfants imitent souvent ce qu’ils voient, alors manger avec eux et leur montrer à quel point vous appréciez le repas en lançant quelques exclamations du type « Hummm! C’est vraiment bon! » peut avoir d’excellentes répercussions. Nanny Robina ajoute que leur donner des collations faciles à saisir, comme des barres tendres faciles à mâcher, est une autre façon de les encourager à essayer des nouveautés et à manger seuls.
  • Soyez patients. Les goûts de votre bébé sont peut-être limités et difficiles à élargir, mais poursuivez son éducation sans baisser les bras. Il est utile de toujours avoir quelques options prêtes à manger sous la main comme les fondants de smoothie PC Biologique : Ils fondent facilement dans la bouche et sont offerts en deux délicieuses saveurs, dont banane, mangue et fruit de la passion, puis banane et fraise.
Continue Reading

Chat

Sex2 semaines ago

Dix films avec des scènes de sexe non simulées qui ont fait polémique

Sex2 semaines ago

Sexe et cannabis : mélange miraculeux ou poison pour le couple ?

Sex2 semaines ago

Chantage émotionnel, dénigrement, harcèlement sexuel : Une jeune scientifique écrit aux comités nationaux d’éthique

Sex2 semaines ago

10 films sur le sexe et le plaisir pour oublier la distanciation sociale

Sex2 semaines ago

Les meilleurs sextoys pour le clitoris

Sex2 semaines ago

Dua Lipa, la reine du melting-pop qui allège le quotidien confiné de ses millions de fans

Sex2 semaines ago

Une série d’ici primée à l’étrange

Technologie4 semaines ago

TELUS adopte une nouvelle promesse de marque

Technologie4 semaines ago

La tech agricole Farmers Edge entre en Bourse à 18 fois ses revenus

Technologie4 semaines ago

NEC Canada accueille Combat Networks en tant que revendeur officiel de UNIVERGE® BLUE CLOUD SERVICES

Technologie4 semaines ago

La relance économique sera verte dans le Bas-Saint-Laurent

Technologie4 semaines ago

Ottawa injecte 2,75 milliards $ pour électrifier la flotte d’autobus au pays

Technologie4 semaines ago

L’entreprise montréalaise Native Touch fait l’acquisition du studio Candy Banners

Actualités4 semaines ago

Lionbridge conclut la vente de sa division d’intelligence artificielle (IA) à TELUS International

Actualités4 semaines ago

Le rôle stratégique et essentiel des métaux rares pour la santé

Actualités4 semaines ago

«Crypto-art» : l’œuvre numérique de la chanteuse Grimes vendue 6 millions de dollars

Actualités4 semaines ago

Un rapport révèle des inégalités pour les femmes de couleur dans les postes de direction canadiens qui font écho au secteur de la technologie

Actualités4 semaines ago

La demande de main-d’œuvre des startups canadiennes montre des signes de reprise au quatrième trimestre: rapport

Actualités4 semaines ago

En attendant la fibre optique

Affaires4 semaines ago

L’Alberta demande à Ottawa d’investir des milliards dans la capture du carbone

Anglais2 années ago

Body found after downtown Lethbridge apartment building fire, police investigating – Lethbridge

Styles De Vie2 années ago

Salon du chocolat 2018: les 5 temps forts

Anglais2 années ago

This B.C. woman’s recipe is one of the most popular of all time — and the story behind it is bananas

Santé Et Nutrition2 années ago

Gluten-Free Muffins

Anglais2 années ago

27 CP Rail cars derail near Lake Louise, Alta.

Anglais2 années ago

Man facing eviction from family home on Toronto Islands gets reprieve — for now

Santé Et Nutrition2 années ago

We Try Kin Euphorics and How to REALLY Get the Glow | Healthyish

Anglais2 années ago

Ontario’s Tories hope Ryan Gosling video will keep supporters from breaking up with the party

Anglais2 années ago

A photo taken on Toronto’s Corso Italia 49 years ago became a family legend. No one saw it — until now

Anglais3 années ago

Condo developer Thomas Liu — who collected millions but hasn’t built anything — loses court fight with Town of Ajax

Styles De Vie3 années ago

Renaud Capuçon, rédacteur en chef du Figaroscope

Anglais2 années ago

This couple shares a 335-square-foot micro condo on Queen St. — and loves it

Mode2 années ago

Paris : chez Cécile Roederer co-fondatrice de Smallable

Anglais2 années ago

Ontario Tories argue Trudeau’s carbon plan is ‘unconstitutional’

Styles De Vie2 années ago

Ford Ranger Raptor, le pick-up roule des mécaniques

Affaires2 années ago

Le Forex devient de plus en plus accessible aux débutants

Anglais2 années ago

100 years later, Montreal’s Black Watch regiment returns to Wallers, France

Technologie2 années ago

YouTube recommande de la pornographie juvénile, allègue un internaute

Anglais2 années ago

Trudeau government would reject Jason Kenney, taxpayers group in carbon tax court fight

Anglais2 années ago

Province’s push for private funding, additional stops puts Scarborough subway at risk of delays

Trending