Connect with us

Santé Et Nutrition

My Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Was Cured by Cooking | Healthyish

Published

on

[ad_1]

When I was eight or nine or ten years old, I found a daddy long legs layered in the sheets of my bed. I tossed it to the floor, crushed it with a book, and thought about it every night for the next 20 years.

I shook my sheets. Every evening I stripped my bed and whipped the sheets like you would a picnic blanket before laying it in the park. I lifted the mattress. I shined a light into the corners of the bed frame.

In college there was a boy in the bed. That didn’t stop me. He’d lay there, his arms at his sides or wrapped around himself to stay warm, and tell me what I was doing was insane. Can you please not?

It was a different boy that finally, at age 30, got me to stop. He was my live-in med-student boyfriend, and he went to bed before me. I’d stay up hours later and sneak into bed quietly, unable to slip off the sheets that were tightly wrapped around him. I learned to silently slide into bed next to him, feeling I was risking something each time but also feeling relief.

That relief stayed with me. After the doctor and I broke up, I did not shake the sheets. After I moved to a new city, to a new apartment, to a new bed, I did not shake the sheets.

So, several years later, when I found a bedbug squirming among the dirty socks in my hamper, I was able to hold myself together. I called my landlord, took some deep breaths, and eventually got into bed.

I lay there, resisting in the dark. But I knew what I would do, what I would not be able not to do. I stood up. I turned on the light.

And then I shook the sheets.


It’s difficult to remember when my reaction to the bedbugs slid from measured to maniacal, to pinpoint the moment when I became so crazed that I essentially started living in my kitchen full time. Within a week of seeing that bedbug (and, finally, after much searching, snatching a second one off the floor), every piece of clothing I owned had been either lugged to the laundromat and heat-treated in those loud commercial dryers or sent off to a special dry cleaner that specializes in bedbug infestations (one of many bedbug-related businesses that prey on people in a panic). I’d opened every drawer and wiped it down with alcohol. I’d sprinkled my bed frame and floor with diatomaceous earth.

I spent hours in front of the mirror, inspecting every burst blood vessel and freckle on my body.

All of this is normal bedbug procedure. You do all this, the exterminator visits, you wait two weeks—living out of plastic bags—and the exterminator comes again. Then you unpack and get back to normal.

Except that the exterminators who came to spray my walls with poison could not find an infestation. They were not in my bed, they were not in the floorboards. I showed them the specimen I had found (I’d trapped it in a plastic bag, where it still squirmed occasionally); they agreed it was a bedbug but told me maybe I’d only had one.

I told them to keep looking. I felt itchy all the time. I spent hours in front of the mirror, inspecting every burst blood vessel and freckle on my body. I took pictures—of my skin, of my sheets—and actually sent these pictures to my landlord as proof, limp as it was, that I needed the exterminator to come back. The landlord complied. When I demanded he fire an exterminator I deemed incompetent, he sent another.

Many months of this exhausted my landlord’s patience. When he told me they were done sending exterminators—they never find anything, David—I spent $350 to hire my own.

When that exterminator came into my apartment, the first thing he said was “Damn. You don’t have to keep your clothes out like this, you know.” My bags of clothes, which I continued to drag to the laundromat every week to heat-treat, just in case, were piled on my couch, on my chair, on every sitting surface. I hadn’t sat down in my apartment for months.

“But there’s an infestation,” I told him. I showed him the bedbug I had found many months ago, now finally starved and dead in the plastic bag. Then I handed him a second bag, this one with the bedbug I’d found on the floor.

He took off his glasses, peered at the bug, shook his head, and handed the bag back to me. “That,” he said, “is a tomato seed.”


Throughout all of this there was labored breathing. There were regular night terrors, when I’d shoot up from sleep, choking on air. There was a panic attack that started in the backseat of my parents’ car and ended in the emergency room. There was the diagnosis from my therapist: obsessive, compulsive, and, looking back, probably OCD for my entire life. And there were more hours than I had ever spent before at the countertop in my kitchen.

Bedbugs prefer to luxuriate in mattresses and comforters. They can give or take a bathroom, and they don’t care about the open bag of graham crackers in the kitchen. So those were the places I stayed.

Already used to cooking most of my meals at home, I suddenly became a project cook. I boiled dough for bagels, braised hulking chunks of pork shoulder, steamed pounds and pounds of mussels, griddled more pancakes than I could eat. Sometimes I just stood there. I had a counter made of thick, cold marble; when I pressed my hand into it I felt the cool spread throughout my body and open up my lungs.

My therapist had given me rules to follow: Stop checking your skin for spots. Sit on the couch. Unpack every single item of clothing, and throw the plastic bags away. My obsession was the fear of bugs; the compulsion was my avoidance. “Compulsions feed obsessions,” my therapist told me. I had to starve one to starve the other.

But there was no rule about leaving the kitchen. So while I slowly followed through on the other stuff—it took weeks for me to sit on the couch and watch a television show—I still spent most of my time at the marble counter.

A few months later I went a step further: I decided my New Year’s resolution would be to cook every meal, every day, for the entire month of January. By this time my clothes had been unpacked for months, I was sitting on my couch again, and 95 percent of the time, when I went to bed at night, I slid in without so much as looking under the covers. (I winced as I did it, as if I was lowering myself into a hot bath. Of acid. But still.)

Compulsions feed obsessions,” my therapist told me. I had to starve one to starve the other.

But what’s obvious to me now—but I did not admit to myself then—is that my resolution was not a salve for my compulsions, but instead a compulsion of its own. My urge to repeat behaviors, to do irrational things in the name of staying safe, is a craving that runs deep. Staying in my kitchen for an entire month satisfied it.

I loved my month in the kitchen. I loved all the money I saved not eating out, all the terrible cafeteria breakfasts I avoided by packing my own. I loved being in the rhythm of daily home cooking and figuring out how to turn Sunday’s lunch into Monday’s dinner. So much cooking felt good—I felt healthy and centered and calm. And I was not the only one. As the month of cooking (which I called COOK90) marched on, strangers from Instagram joined me. Soon there were thousands of us, an army of home cooks taking control of their kitchens and their diets and their pantries and their time. Four years later COOK90 is something we do on Epicurious every year, and it’s a brand-new book. Over 150,000 people use it as a sort of cure; none of them know that, for me, it was a cure and a compulsion at the same time.


One of my exterminators—who can say which one?—had set out sticky traps all around my apartment as a way to monitor the bedbug problem that you and I both know by now was nonexistent.

The traps caught no bedbugs. They caught no more tomato seeds. But occasionally they would catch something else. One morning I woke up to the squeaks of a mouse whose feet were glued to the board. Another morning I encountered a horrifying satanic four-inch-long roach. Both were caught in the kitchen.

I brushed these off as one-time murders. But a few days later, I caught another roach. And then another. Finally, one night, frying chicken cutlets, a particularly ballsy roach appeared from under the stove, ran between my legs, across the room, and under the fridge. I froze, unable to move, until the roach made its return trip. This time I attacked. I stomped but missed. Stomped again, missed again. The terrified roach swerved and spun. Finally, I killed the thing.

My new boyfriend, who was in the kitchen with me, laughed. But I was now convinced that a hive of roaches lived under the floorboards. And like that, the kitchen and the bedroom switched places: The kitchen became the room to fear, and the triple-exterminated bedroom became the refuge.

Except that this time I knew the score. I knew that the fear—the obsession—of being eaten alive by roaches was illogical. I knew that avoiding the kitchen—the compulsion—fed the obsession.

Fear is familiar, a security blanket that does not work but that I want to hold on to anyway.

So there was only one solution. If COOK90 started as a compulsion that fed an obsession, now it would have to be the opposite. It would have to be the behavior that fought the compulsion and chipped away at the fear.

In other words, I had to cook. Oh, I looked for ways to get around it: cheese and crackers instead of a proper dinner, last-minute decisions to eat a burger at a bar. Every time I caught myself avoiding the kitchen, I’d tell myself to reverse course. It was not easy. I flinched, gasped, paced, winced, wrapped my arms around myself, tapped my foot, said “Jesus f*#%ing Christ!” out loud for no reason. And that was all before I started chopping.

Then I’d turn on a flame, and that would help. My attention would shift to the shallots sizzling in olive oil, the skin-down chicken in the cast-iron pan. The longer they cooked, the fainter my fear. I was reluctant to let the fear go because fear is familiar, a security blanket that does not work but that I want to hold on to anyway. But the smell of frying onions sparked chemical reactions in my brain. It calmed me, even when I didn’t want to be calm.

It was not magic. It was the science of distraction and the power of hunger. And it didn’t cure me, because nothing can cure me. A couple years later, I moved to another apartment, and in my first year saw nothing so much as a fly. I thanked God for my bug-free apartment, and then, one night when I was alone—of course I was alone—I saw it: a roach on the counter, sniffing the olive oil like a dog about to piss on a hydrant.

A familiar tension seized my body. All I could do was stare. When the bug ran behind a wall, to a place where I would never reach it, I silently screamed. Then I flipped on a burner and forced myself to keep cooking.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Santé Et Nutrition

Démystifier la dyslexie

Published

on

By

(EN) Les enfants entament une nouvelle année scolaire au cours de laquelle ils vont se faire des amis, s’adapter à leurs nouveaux enseignants et faire face à de nouveaux défis. Certains d’entre eux auront plus de difficultés que d’autres, mais comment savoir si un trouble d’apprentissage ne nuit pas à votre enfant et à sa capacité de réussir ?

L’un des troubles les plus fréquents est la dyslexie. Environ 15 % des Canadiens en sont atteints et pourtant, selon une étude récente, moins d’un tiers d’entre nous serait capable d’en reconnaître les signes.

Bien que la dyslexie ne se guérisse pas, il est possible de la contrôler grâce à une détection précoce et à un enseignement adéquat. C’est pourquoi il est important de pouvoir reconnaître la dyslexie.

Voici ce qu’il faut savoir :

Qu’est-ce que c’est ? La dyslexie est un trouble d’apprentissage qui se caractérise par des difficultés à identifier les sons produits en parlant et à reconnaître les lettres, les mots et les chiffres. Le cerveau interprète mal les sons, les lettres et les chiffres quand il les assemble et en arrive souvent à tout mélanger, ce qui est déroutant pour la personne. La dyslexie touche tout le monde de la même façon, sans considération de genre et peu importe le milieu socio-économique ou l’origine ethnique de la personne.

Que peut-on faire ? Si vous pensez que votre enfant peut être dyslexique, n’attendez pas pour réagir. Il existe de nombreux tests à passer en ligne qui peuvent vous aider à l’identifier. Si vous croyez que c’est le cas, demandez à accéder à des ressources supplémentaires à votre école ou communiquez avec un tuteur spécialisé en littératie structurée. Faites appel à des groupes d’entraide pour en apprendre davantage.

Comment favoriser la réussite ? « Ce n’est pas parce qu’une personne a reçu un diagnostic de trouble d’apprentissage qu’elle ne peut pas réussir dans la vie. Ses apprentissages se font tout simplement d’une manière différente », explique Christine Staley, directrice générale de Dyslexia Canada. « Une détection précoce et un enseignement adéquat en lecture sont essentiels pour contrôler la dyslexie et ouvrir la voie à un brillant avenir. »

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Les extincteurs portatifs améliorent la sécurité à domicile

Published

on

By

(EN) Lorsqu’un incendie se déclare, chaque seconde compte. S’ils sont utilisés rapidement et de façon efficace, les extincteurs de feu portatifs peuvent aider à sauver des vies. C’est pourquoi ils font partie de ces éléments importants qui permettent d’assurer votre sécurité et celle de votre famille à domicile.

Suivez ces conseils concernant la façon d’utiliser un extincteur de feu et le meilleur endroit pour l’installer afin d’être prêt en cas d’urgence :

Comparez les caractéristiques. Choisissez un extincteur résidentiel doté d’une goupille de métal et d’un levier de commande, aussi durable qu’un extincteur de qualité commerciale, ainsi que d’un manomètre à code couleur facile à lire afin de vous assurer que l’appareil est chargé. Sachez qu’il n’est pas sécuritaire d’utiliser un extincteur qui a déjà été déchargé, surtout qu’il existe maintenant des extincteurs rechargeables qui peuvent être rechargés par un professionnel certifié si vous avez utilisé l’appareil.

Sachez comment vous en servir : Tous les extincteurs de feu sont vendus avec des instructions d’utilisation. Toutefois, plus de 70 % des consommateurs qui possèdent un extincteur affirment ne pas se sentir à l’aise de le faire fonctionner. Solution pratique et conviviale, le pulvérisateur d’incendie First Alert est une bombe aérosol au design simple qui constitue un dispositif supplémentaire efficace pour les incendies domestiques. Grâce à une buse précise qui permet de pulvériser sur une grande surface, l’utilisateur peut mieux contrôler l’application. De plus, comme il n’y a pas de goupille à tirer ni de levier à serrer, il est possible d’éteindre un incendie rapidement.

Gardez à portée de la main : Lorsque chaque seconde compte, il est essentiel d’avoir un extincteur de feu à proximité afin de réagir rapidement. Il est préférable de placer un extincteur à chaque étage de la maison et dans les pièces où le risque d’incendie est plus élevé, comme la cuisine et le garage. La National Fire Protection Association (NPFA) recommande d’installer des extincteurs à la sortie des pièces afin de les décharger et de vous sauver rapidement par la suite si l’incendie ne peut être maîtrisé.

Sachez quand quitter la maison. Une des composantes d’un plan d’intervention en cas d’incendie consiste à essayer d’éteindre un petit incendie avec un extincteur de feu, mais l’objectif principal doit être l’évacuation de la famille en toute sécurité. Un extincteur n’est pas un substitut à la mise en place d’un plan d’évacuation résidentielle en cas d’incendie, qui doit être pratiqué régulièrement, ni à l’installation d’avertisseurs de fumée fonctionnels dans toute la maison – un à chaque étage et dans chaque chambre, afin de permettre la détection rapide d’un incendie.

Continue Reading

Santé Et Nutrition

Comment aider un bébé à développer son goût

Published

on

By

(EN) Un bébé qui n’est pas encouragé à manger une variété d’aliments dès son plus jeune âge aura de fortes chances à devenir un enfant difficile qui n’acceptera que ses plats préférés, comme des croquettes de poulet ou des hotdogs.

Pour faire en sorte que votre bébé soit ouvert et enthousiaste lorsque vient le moment d’essayer de nouveaux aliments, Nanny Robina, l’une des plus grandes expertes en matière d’éducation des enfants au Canada, vous propose des conseils pour faire de votre un enfant un gourmet aventureux :

  • Offrez de la variété. Restez constants et introduisez autant de nouveaux aliments que possible, ainsi que des collations colorées et attrayantes.  Offrir au bébé une variété de saveurs et de textures et même des aliments qui fondent facilement dans la bouche est un excellent moyen de s’assurer qu’il demeure ouvert à une variété d’options.
  • Mangez avec lui. Asseyez-vous près de votre bébé et mangez à côté de lui. Les enfants imitent souvent ce qu’ils voient, alors manger avec eux et leur montrer à quel point vous appréciez le repas en lançant quelques exclamations du type « Hummm! C’est vraiment bon! » peut avoir d’excellentes répercussions. Nanny Robina ajoute que leur donner des collations faciles à saisir, comme des barres tendres faciles à mâcher, est une autre façon de les encourager à essayer des nouveautés et à manger seuls.
  • Soyez patients. Les goûts de votre bébé sont peut-être limités et difficiles à élargir, mais poursuivez son éducation sans baisser les bras. Il est utile de toujours avoir quelques options prêtes à manger sous la main comme les fondants de smoothie PC Biologique : Ils fondent facilement dans la bouche et sont offerts en deux délicieuses saveurs, dont banane, mangue et fruit de la passion, puis banane et fraise.
Continue Reading

Chat

Anglais3 mois ago

Nostalgia and much more with Starburst XXXtreme

Opinions3 mois ago

Même les jeunes RÉPUBLIQUES se lassent du capitalisme, selon les sondeurs américains — RT USA News

Opinions3 mois ago

« Aucune crise climatique ne causera la fin du capitalisme ! »

Opinions3 mois ago

Innovation : le capitalisme « responsable », faux problème et vraie diversion

Opinions3 mois ago

Vers la fin du Capitalocène ?

Opinions3 mois ago

Le “capitalisme viral” peut-il sauver la planète ?

Opinions3 mois ago

Livre : comment le capitalisme a colonisé les esprits

Opinions3 mois ago

Patrick Artus : « Le capitalisme d’aujourd’hui est économiquement inefficace »

Opinions3 mois ago

Zemmour candidat “sous-marin” pro-Macron, ce complotisme autorisé…

Opinions3 mois ago

La durée des vols bientôt divisée par deux. Merci le capitalisme !

Opinions3 mois ago

Economie politique. «Brevets et capitalisme»

Opinions3 mois ago

Le Parti communiste d’Afrique du Sud a cent ans

Opinions3 mois ago

Le wokisme est un anti-libéralisme

Opinions3 mois ago

Au moment où la critique du capitalisme ultralibéral et financiarisé obtient un plus large consensus, il devient crucial de ne plus se limiter à elle : aujourd’hui, l’enjeu cardinal est celui de l’alternative à un modèle discrédit.

Opinions3 mois ago

Ce que le capitalisme fait aux femmes

Mode3 mois ago

Louis Vuitton crée Charlie, sa première basket unisexe et écoresponsable

Mode3 mois ago

L’Événement Evening Dresses Show Retourne À Salerno Du 1 Au 3 Septembre 2021 Inaugurant La Saison Internationale Du Prêt-À-Porter

Mode3 mois ago

LVMH continue son ascension, tiré par son activité Mode et Maroquinerie

Mode3 mois ago

Mode: Carven va rouvrir aux Champs-Elysées, après des décennies de fermeture

Mode3 mois ago

Mode : les créations de Công Tri plébiscitées par les stars internationales

Anglais3 années ago

Body found after downtown Lethbridge apartment building fire, police investigating – Lethbridge

Styles De Vie3 années ago

Salon du chocolat 2018: les 5 temps forts

Anglais3 années ago

This B.C. woman’s recipe is one of the most popular of all time — and the story behind it is bananas

Santé Et Nutrition3 années ago

Gluten-Free Muffins

Anglais3 années ago

27 CP Rail cars derail near Lake Louise, Alta.

Anglais3 années ago

Man facing eviction from family home on Toronto Islands gets reprieve — for now

Santé Et Nutrition3 années ago

We Try Kin Euphorics and How to REALLY Get the Glow | Healthyish

Anglais3 années ago

Ontario’s Tories hope Ryan Gosling video will keep supporters from breaking up with the party

Anglais3 années ago

A photo taken on Toronto’s Corso Italia 49 years ago became a family legend. No one saw it — until now

Anglais3 années ago

Condo developer Thomas Liu — who collected millions but hasn’t built anything — loses court fight with Town of Ajax

Styles De Vie3 années ago

Renaud Capuçon, rédacteur en chef du Figaroscope

Anglais3 années ago

This couple shares a 335-square-foot micro condo on Queen St. — and loves it

Anglais3 années ago

Ontario Tories argue Trudeau’s carbon plan is ‘unconstitutional’

Mode3 années ago

Paris : chez Cécile Roederer co-fondatrice de Smallable

Styles De Vie3 années ago

Ford Ranger Raptor, le pick-up roule des mécaniques

Affaires3 années ago

Le Forex devient de plus en plus accessible aux débutants

Anglais3 années ago

100 years later, Montreal’s Black Watch regiment returns to Wallers, France

Anglais3 années ago

Trudeau government would reject Jason Kenney, taxpayers group in carbon tax court fight

Technologie3 années ago

YouTube recommande de la pornographie juvénile, allègue un internaute

Anglais1 année ago

The Bill Gates globalist vaccine depopulation agenda… as revealed by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

Trending