Christmas trip home has special significance for couple affected by Danforth shooting

[ad_1]

Jerry Pinksen introduced his girlfriend, Danielle Kane, to all the expected things on her first trip to Newfoundland over Christmas. The couple visited friends and family in Pinksen’s hometown of Straitsview on the Northern Peninsula and spent time outdoors enjoying the winter weather.

« I got to ride on a Ski-Doo for the first time, and I drove it too, » Kane told The St. John’s Morning Show. She called the experience « exhilarating, » even if she was surprised by how cold her thumbs got.

« Remember, she’s still a mainlander, » Pinksen joked. « There’s only so much we can do; she’s not so tough as us. »

But Kane is actually plenty tough, as her boyfriend of two years and many others have seen first-hand over the past few months. The ability to travel for a Christmas vacation in rural Newfoundland is one sign — of many — of how much the Toronto woman has recovered since she was injured in the July 22 shooting in the city’s Danforth neighbourhood.

Kane rode — and drove — a snowmobile for the first time while on the Northern Peninsula. (Provided by Jerry Pinksen)

« It was fantastic. I loved it. Everyone was so warm and welcoming, » Kane said. The trip came just five months after she spent 11 days in a medically induced coma in intensive care, the start of her long recovery from injuries that left her in a wheelchair.

« I felt like I was coming home even though I hadn’t met a lot of the folks up there. »

July 22 shooting

On the evening of July 22, Pinksen and Kane were having dinner with a friend on the patio of the Danforth’s 7Numbers restaurant when they heard gunshots.

The group ran inside for shelter but Pinksen, an emergency room nurse, left to help when he heard someone outside had been shot.

« With my medical training I knew I could help this person, so I told Danielle, ‘I have to exit, I have to help this woman,' » he said.

He didn’t know that Kane, a nursing student herself who had first aid training, had followed him to the restaurant’s emergency exit.

« I didn’t think that Jerry should go out by himself because in any emergency situation you’re going to want all hands on deck, » Kane said.

If the gunshot was just a little bit higher, I probably would not have made it.– Danielle Kane

Pinksen was able to duck out of the way when he saw the shooter, Faisal Hussain, raise a gun, but Kane was hit while standing in the exit.

« I was told that if the gunshot was just a little bit higher, I probably would not have made it, » she said.

Recovering from injuries

Though she survived the shooting, her injuries mean she will remain in a wheelchair, Kane said.

Her T11 vertebra was shattered, and doctors had to fuse her T10 and T20 vertebrae. She also needed three abdominal surgeries to clean internal debris left by injuries to her stomach, she said.

Kane had several surgeries and spent 11 days in a medically induced coma after the July shooting. (GoFundMe)

« My abdomen was left open for three days because there was too much swelling. »

However, Kane says she has recovered significantly since the shooting and expects to continue to do so through her ongoing rehabilitation in Toronto.

« I’ve learned that basically I can still gain back a lot of independence. I’ll be able to drive again, I’ll be able to return to work, and I’ll still be able to have children, » she said. 

« It’s not a death sentence. »

Danielle Kane attends rehabilitation therapy a few times a week and is exercising to build her strength, with a goal of getting her driver’s licence in the spring. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

She hopes to regain her licence in the spring, and plans to intern with the Ontario Nurses’ Association this summer before resuming her nursing studies in September.

Pinksen said he’s not prepared to return to work in an emergency room, but he hopes to continue to deal with the trauma of the shooting and reassess his readiness in a few months.

For now, he said, he is focusing on helping Danielle recover, especially considering the benefit his medical experience brings to their situation.

Kane, left, says she loved her first visit to Newfoundland, spent with Pinksen, standing, and his family. ‘Everyone was so warm and welcoming,’ she says. (Provided by Jerry Pinksen)

« It’s better for us to be healing together and while I can help Danielle the best way I can, being a nurse, » he said.

Having Pinksen’s help, as well as the support of family and friends, has been key in staying optimistic about the future, Kane said. 

« It’s been amazing. Everyone asks me, ‘Why are you doing so well?’ And I’m like, ‘I have such great support.' »

Focused on the future

Pinksen and Kane continue to have some sympathy for Hussain, 29, who killed himself after the shooting, in which he injured 13 people and killed two.

The two have had a lot to process since Kane was released from the hospital, but both still believe Hussain must have been struggling himself to act as he did.

« I still believe in my heart that this person was suffering, » said Pinksen. 

« He had to be suffering to think and plan out such an assault on all these individuals and want to bring so much terror and pain. »

Pinksen and Kane both say they are trying to look ahead to their future. ‘We can’t dwell on what happened,’ Pinksen says. (Provided by Jerry Pinksen)

Kane pointed to her own history with depression, saying that she believes Hussain must have been not only disturbed, but isolated and lonely.

« I try to think about how my depression affected my life before, and how maybe I didn’t appreciate what I had, all the good things I had in my life before, » she said.

Focusing on that good has helped her recovery, Kane said, because it has helped her realize how much love she has in her life and how much living she has left to do.

The couple tries to look toward the full life they have ahead instead of back on what happened, Pinksen said.

« We try not to dwell on him or that, and just know that we’re still lucky to be alive, we’re still lucky to have each other, and we’re just going to look forward. »

Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Global Affairs Canada says it knows of no Canadians affected by Indonesia tsunami – National

[ad_1]

Global Affairs Canada is not aware of any Canadians that have been affected by a tsunami that struck Indonesia Saturday night and has killed over 200 people.


READ MORE:
Tsunami triggered by volcanic eruption kills 222 in Indonesia, injures over 800

“Canada is deeply saddened by the tragedy caused by the Sunda Strait tsunami in Indonesia,” Global Affairs spokesperson Brendan Sutton said. “We are not aware of any Canadians who have been affected.

“Consular officials are in contact with local authorities and stand ready to provide consular assistance to Canadian citizens if needed.”

The Minister of International Development’s office also said that Indonesia has not asked for aid, which is needed before Canada can chip in.

WATCH: Video appears to show tsunami hit as Indonesia pop band performs






“[Canada] cannot offer aid until there [is] an international call by the host government,” said Louis Belanger, a spokesperson for International Development Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau. “At this time, the Government of Indonesia has not requested international humanitarian assistance.

“Our mission and humanitarian partners on the ground are assessing and monitoring closely the situation,” he said.

At least 222 people are dead from the tsunami that struck Indonesia’s Sunda Strait Saturday night, while more than 800 have been reported injured, Indonesia’s Disaster Management Agency said.


READ MORE:
Tsunami wave crashes into concert on Indonesian beach, killing 2 band members: video

Scientists say that the tsunami could have been caused by undersea landslides triggered by an eruption from the nearby Anak Krakatau volcano, and was aided by the full moon.

The death toll may rise as some affected areas have not been reached yet.

Travel Canada has updated its website with information on the tsunami, saying to “follow the instructions of local authorities and monitor local news for information.” It has not issued a specific travel warning related to the tsunami yet.

WATCH: Indonesia police rescue child from rubble after deadly tsunami






Global Affairs recommends to call the Embassy of Canada in Jakarta at +62 21 2550 7800, the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa at +1-613-996-8885 or email sos@international.gc.ca. if emergency consular assistance is needed.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

GM working to retrain employees affected by Oshawa plant closure

[ad_1]

General Motors of Canada is working with other employers to identify jobs and targeted training programs for GM employees affected by plans to close the Oshawa Assembly plant next year, the truck and auto maker said Friday.

It says several employers have identified about 2,000 jobs that will become open in Durham region in 2019 and 2020 — many of them related to the refurbishment of the Darlington nuclear power plant southeast of Oshawa.

General Motors has also identified 300 openings for auto technicians at GM dealerships in Ontario and 100 jobs that will be open at other GM facilities in Ontario.

In addition, GM estimates about half of the 3,000 unionized and salaried employees are eligible to retire under the company’s defined benefit pension plan — leaving about 1,500 who will want to transition to new occupations.

GM Canada vice-president David Paterson said the company is committed to spend « millions » to ensure its employees get the retraining they require, but the exact amount will depend on what other employers provide.

« What we want to do is to assure employees that their training will be taken care of. We’ll make sure that there’s enough money to do that, » he said in an interview.

OPG wants to hire Oshawa workers, GM says

GM Canada says Durham College will also establish a confidential internet portal in the new year to help auto workers identify job openings and begin plans to take retraining courses offered by a consortium of colleges.

The city of Oshawa and surrounding areas east of Toronto were shocked last month when the highly rated Oshawa Assembly plant was included as one of five North American GM plants identified to close next year.

Unifor national president Jerry Dias has said the union would fight against the Oshawa closure.

« They are not closing our damn plant without one hell of a fight, » Dias said Nov. 26.

Paterson said GM recognizes that the union has voiced « some strong opinions » but thinks it would be good for employees if they have time to plan for their future.

« We have an obligation and duty to work with our union to determine — in addition to our pensions and the income supplements our employees will get — what things we can provide, » Paterson said.

He said two of the prospective employers that came to GM after the closure announcement are Ontario Power Generation and Aecon, a construction company, working on the nuclear plant’s refurbishment.

« They have huge needs in terms of millwrights, boiler makers, electricians and a number of areas where our employees are especially suited to that type of work and have great experience, » Paterson said.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

GM working to retrain employees affected by Oshawa plant closure

[ad_1]

General Motors of Canada is working with other employers to identify jobs and targeted training programs for GM employees affected by plans to close the Oshawa Assembly plant next year, the truck and auto maker said Friday.

It says several employers have identified about 2,000 jobs that will become open in Durham region in 2019 and 2020 — many of them related to the refurbishment of the Darlington nuclear power plant southeast of Oshawa.

General Motors has also identified 300 openings for auto technicians at GM dealerships in Ontario and 100 jobs that will be open at other GM facilities in Ontario.

In addition, GM estimates about half of the 3,000 unionized and salaried employees are eligible to retire under the company’s defined benefit pension plan — leaving about 1,500 who will want to transition to new occupations.

GM Canada vice-president David Paterson said the company is committed to spend « millions » to ensure its employees get the retraining they require @but the exact amount will depend on what other employers provide.

« What we want to do is to assure employees that their training will be taken care of. We’ll make sure that there’s enough money to do that, » he said in an interview.

OPG wants to hire Oshawa workers, GM says

GM Canada says Durham College will also establish a confidential internet portal in the new year to help auto workers identify job openings and begin plans to take retraining courses offered by a consortium of colleges.

The city of Oshawa and surrounding areas east of Toronto were shocked last month when the highly rated Oshawa Assembly plant was included as one of five North American GM plants identified to close next year.

Unifor national president Jerry Dias has said the union would fight against the Oshawa closure.

« They are not closing our damn plant without one hell of a fight, » Dias said Nov. 26.

Paterson said GM recognizes that the union has voiced « some strong opinions » but thinks it would be good for employees if they have time to plan for their future.

« We have an obligation and duty to work with our union to determine — in addition to our pensions and the income supplements our employees will get — what things we can provide, » Paterson said.

He said two of the prospective employers that came to GM after the closure announcement are Ontario Power Generation and Aecon, a construction company, working on the nuclear plant’s refurbishment.

« They have huge needs in terms of millwrights, boiler makers, electricians and a number of areas where our employees are especially suited to that type of work and have great experience, » Paterson said.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Fire burns through Vanier apartment building, 223 occupants affected – Ottawa

[ad_1]

Ottawa firefighters had to rescue several residents from their balconies after a three-alarm fire broke out in an apartment high-rise east of the downtown core early Wednesday.

Twenty-five people were assessed and eight people were taken to hospital for smoke inhalation, a spokesperson for Ottawa paramedics said.


READ MORE:
Ottawa man charged with arson after fire guts Lincoln Fields Wendy’s

The fire occurred at an apartment building at 251 Donald St. Ottawa fire dispatch began receiving calls at around 5 a.m. and by 5:39 a.m. a third alarm was declared as the fire had spread.

According to Ottawa fire, calls came from residents from the second floor all the way to the 21st. In some cases, residents tried to escape the smoke by going out onto their the balconies and as a result ladder rescues had to be done.

Firefighters evacuated the building and the fire was brought under control by 6:03 a.m. Power to the building was lost, though.

According to Ottawa fire spokesperson Danielle Cardinal, the building will remain evacuated for a minimum of 24- 48 hours while the fire marshal investigates. Those in need of shelter or food are being assisted at the Vanier community centre. The Salvation Army, Red Cross and the City of Ottawa are all on site to assist all 223 occupants who have been affected.

As of 10 a.m. Wednesday, Ottawa firefighters are working through the building with assistance from the city to deal with pets that were left behind.

According to Marc Deschamps, spokesperson for Ottawa paramedics, while fire and paramedics were sweeping the building for anyone left. They discovered a woman in her bed suffering from an unrelated health issue. She was quickly rushed to hospital.

“If it wasn’t for this fire she might not have been found,” Deschamps says. “The fire saved her life.”

The building is managed by Ottawa Community Housing.

There has been no damage estimate as the fire marshal continues to investigate.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Another Canadian diplomat in Cuba affected by mysterious brain injury

[ad_1]

Another Canadian diplomat has reported a traumatic brain injury while stationed in Cuba, bringing to 13 the total number of cases among diplomats and dependents with « unusual health symptoms. »

The affected person is receiving medical attention, according to a statement from Global Affairs Canada, while the government continues to investigate the potential causes of the so-called Havana Syndrome.

« In light of this new information, a decision has been made to allow staff currently posted to Cuba to return to Canada if they wish, » the statement read.

It’s been more than a year since the last report of such an injury at the Canadian embassy in Havana. Several U.S. and Canadian diplomats and family members have been treated over the past two years after reporting strange concussion-like symptoms.

Both countries believe their diplomats have been targeted using an unknown technology, and both the FBI and RCMP are investigating. The U.S. has also imposed sanctions on Cuba over the attacks, though officials in both Washington and Ottawa believe that the Cuban government is probably telling the truth when it denies involvement.

A delegation of senior Canadian government officials will travel to Cuba next week to review the current operations and assess how to further reduce risks, the statement read.

Long hiatus between attacks

Last winter, Canada made some changes at its Havana mission in response to attacks that had affected 12 diplomats and their family members, including children. Havana became un « unaccompanied » posting, meaning family members were no longer encouraged to join diplomatics in Havana.

Canada also renewed its personnel at the embassy, and found accommodation for the newcomers in a single compound rather than having them dispersed around the city in private homes and apartments. The new accommodations are not close to any U.S. diplomatic facility, lessening the chance that the Canadians in Havana are being confused with U.S. diplomats.

Prior to the newest case, the last Canadian to report symptoms was diagnosed last fall, but believed the original attack had occurred earlier that summer. The newest case — involving a career diplomat, according to government sources — comes after almost 18 months with no reported incident.

Universities studying effects

The most recent case is expected to be examined by a Dalhousie University neurologist who is looking into the effects of the brain injuries and their possible causes. Global Affairs Canada also sent some of its affected diplomats to the University of Pennsylvania, which has taken the lead in examining U.S. diplomatic personnel and family members at the request of the State Department.

Some of the U..S diplomats affected reported hearing strange noises before their symptoms appeared, or experiencing uncomfortable physical sensations.

Canadian government sources say that of the 12 Canadians who were previously affected, only one reported feeling a sensation of waves or pulses coming through the air. In all other cases, the Canadians became aware of their injuries when they began to experience symptoms.

In the newest case, the diplomat also could not recall any particular incident that might have triggered the symptoms.

Who’s behind it? 

U.S. officials have said that the attacks are not consistent with any known technology or weapon, but they believe they are deliberate and targeted. Some scientists have pointed to microwave technology as a possible culprit, but neither the U.S. nor the Canadian government has yet settled on an explanation.

The assumption is that the attacks are the work of a state actor with a presence in Cuba, but the timing of the incidents — which began during a period of U.S.-Cuban rapprochement — does not suggest Cuban official involvement.

Potential suspects include other governments such as Russia or China, or rogue elements within the Cuban regime, possibly colluding with a foreign government.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Ontario government to increase mercury disability payments to affected First Nations

[ad_1]

TORONTO – The Ontario government says it is moving to ensure people who receive mercury disability payments are properly compensated by retroactively indexing payments to the rate of inflation.

The government says more than 200 people in the First Nations communities of Grassy Narrows and Wabaseemoong receive the payments, which have been frozen since 1985.

Mercury contamination has plagued the English-Wabigoon River system since a paper mill in Dryden, Ont., dumped 9,000 kilograms of the toxic substance into the river systems in the 1960s.


READ MORE:
Report finds Grassy Narrows residents’ health ‘significantly worse’ than other First Nations

The contamination closed a thriving commercial fishery and devastated Grassy Narrows’ economy.

The government said Friday it remains committed to cleaning up the mercury contamination in the English and Wabigoon Rivers.

A health survey earlier this year found the health of people living in the northern Ontario communities was “significantly worse” than other First Nations.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Veterans Affairs cuts benefits to jailed relatives, but won’t say if Garnier affected

[ad_1]

Veterans Affairs Canada will not pay for benefits for incarcerated relatives of veterans in the wake of the Christopher Garnier case.

But what wasn’t immediately clear whether this move by Veterans Affairs will have any direct impact on Garnier. The department wouldn’t comment on his case, citing privacy.

« Going forward, treatment benefits will not be provided to a veteran’s family member who is incarcerated in a provincial or federal facility, » Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan said in a statement to CBC News. 

« Those facilities would be responsible for the treatment of persons in their institutions. » 

Garnier spurred controversy when it became known during a sentencing hearing in August that Veterans Affairs had paid for his PTSD treatment in jail. 

A Nova Scotia court heard Garnier developed PTSD as a result of murdering Catherine Campbell, an off-duty police officer.

The court was told that Garnier’s father, who had served in the Canadian Forces, also has PTSD, and that getting treatment for his son helps them both.

Garnier, 30, was convicted of second-degree murder in the death of Campbell in Sept. 2015. He later received a life sentence. 

‘A disgusting insult’

It’s unclear how many people the decision affects. Veterans Affairs Canada told CBC News it doesn’t keep records of how many incarcerated family members of veterans are receiving benefits from the department.

O’Regan formally announced the revised policy Tuesday in response to a question in the House of Commons from Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, who called the payments a « disgusting insult » and part of the « abysmal » Liberal record on veterans.

« I have reviewed the department’s findings on this issue, and I am directing them to ensure the services received by a family member of a veteran are related to the veteran’s service and where they are not, that the case be reviewed by a senior official, » O’Regan said.

O’Regan said the policy change was made in light of the Garnier case.

« We’re reviewing this in light of what happened with Christopher Garnier, no question, » O’Regan said.

O’Regan won’t discuss

« I am directing the department to immediately address its policy in providing treatment to family members under extenuating circumstances such as conviction of such a serious crime. »

O’Regan refused to discuss specifics of the case, insisting he is committed to protecting the privacy of the veteran.

His statement came after the Conservatives used their opposition day in the House to debate the issue.

During Question Period Tuesday, Phil McColeman, the federal Conservatives’ critic for Veterans Affairs, asked Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan to intervene in the Garnier case and « right this wrong. »

He said veterans across Canada are outraged Garnier is receiving benefits through Veterans Affairs.

« We will not let the minister avoid answering this question, » McColeman said.

‘You are a disgrace’

O’Regan said the federal government has placed the highest priority on making sure veterans and their families have support and services they need, when they need them. He said he wouldn’t discuss Garnier’s case.

« When it comes to Canada’s veterans and their families, we are not in the business of political opportunism. We are interested in getting veterans well again, » O’Regan said during Question Period Tuesday.

Earlier, Alberta Conservative MP Michelle Rempel berated O’Regan on Twitter, calling the minister a « ridiculous coward. »

« Do your job and revoke his benefits. You are a disgrace, » she tweeted.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس