The Roast Beef Sandwich Recipe That Makes the Best Holiday Feast

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I remember feeling very confused as a child—most of the time, all of the time—but especially at the end of How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, when the Grinch turns his attitude around and serves every Who in Whoville a slice of “roast beast.” The cartoon roast looked delicious, with its browned edges and pink inside. But how would it feed all the Whos? I wondered. What is roast beast? I wondered. Then I dreamed, as little girls do, about a fat slice of roast beast being handed to me by a smug man with four furry fingers.

grinch roast beast

I assumed it was roast beef, for obvious reasons, but on closer inspection, it’s gotta be a ham or a roast goose. Food director Carla Lalli Music confirms the goose theories. Well that’s not gonna feed all the Whos in Whoville (a.k.a. the eight people I call my friends)! To recreate this scene properly, and to feed a crowd this holiday, the best meat for the job is really a huge hunk of roast beef. Specifically, this garlic-rosemary slow roast beef by Chris Morocco.

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You start with a 4-lb. New York strip roast, which I picked up from a butcher who had the gall to charge me $130 for it. “But it’s Christmassss!” I said with a Cindy Lou pout. “No shit,” he replied with a bloody thwack to the cutting board. “Ok-ay.” I swiped that credit card.

The only thing elaborate about Chris’s recipe is the quality of that hunk of meat, the sheer size of the lad. The rest is pretty simple. A day before roasting, I seasoned it with salt and pep and rubbed it with a garlic-rosemary-oil mixture that made my kitchen smell incredible. The next day, the beast went into the oven at a mere 200° for almost three hours. Low and slow is the name of the game. During that time I made a nice salad dressing, bought some Martin’s potato buns, whipped up the horseradish sour cream, and read a novel’s worth of cheesecake recipe reviews by strangers on the internet, searching for truth. (I landed on Craig Claiborne’s, if you’re curious. It came out rich and dense; you could carve “David” from it.)

By the time the was beef was resting, my friends had arrived for cocktails and a little activity we call Lookit The Meat!, where you stand around the kitchen looking at that huge roast. Mingle mingle, kris and kringle, and then when it was about time to feast, I browned the roast in the biggest Dutch oven I own (Lodge’s 7.5 quart), a couple minutes per side.

DINNER TIME. Cue the Grinch-style slicing at the cutting board. Big knife, big grin, but thin slices, ideally. It was just like the cartoon, it has to be said: The beef was bright pink inside, and a general joy to behold, and the rosemary-garlic crust was deeply browned and crispy. Around the table, we loaded the sliced beef on soft buns with a slathering of horseradish cream, some mustard, and cornichons. Unlike Thanksgiving or other roast beast feasts, this isn’t a “pass the mashed potatoes, papa,” formal dinner. It’s a construction zone. Spoons stuck in mustard pots, rolls flying across the table. You get to be yourself. Load up the sandwich with four cornichons, sliced perfectly in half.

The luxury of the roast beef still makes it a special occasion, but a festive one. And you eat with your hands! There’s no other way. The assembly of a roast beef sandwich is like trimming your best friend’s show-offy 8-foot tree, or holding the rickety ladder as your awkward step-brother outlines the house in lights, or sloppily decorating sugar cookies with your 14 cousins. It’s about forced interaction with those you love—even if it gets a little messy sometimes.

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Slow Roast Beef Recipe | Bon Appetit

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Lightly score fat cap of roast, spacing cuts about ¾ » apart, with a sharp knife, being careful not to slice into the flesh. Season roast generously on all sides with salt and pepper. Mix garlic, rosemary, and 3 Tbsp. oil in a small bowl and rub all over roast. Loosely cover with plastic wrap and chill at least 12 hours and up to 2 days.

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Jennifer Garner Loves Ina Garten’s Beef Bourguignon

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In honor of Ina Garten’s guest editing week, we asked chefs and celebrity fans to share their favorite Barefoot Contessa recipes as part of our series “How Easy Is That?” Below, actress Jennifer Garner (currently starring on Camping on HBO) reveals how she discovered Ina’s classic beef bourguignon.

What is my favorite Ina Garten recipe? This is an unfair question, I may have to quit here. How could I possibly choose a favorite? Do you mean to ask me my favorite from each book? My favorite chicken, my favorite shrimp, my favorite muffin? Torture.

Okay, okay. My favorite Ina recipe is Ina’s beef bourguignon. (Called by its traditional French name boeuf bourguignon in the book.) The first time I made it was ages ago—we were shooting Alias in the early 2000s, and my co-star Michael Vartan had hunted down a signed copy of Barefoot in Paris for me. I made dinner for Victor Garber—who played my dad on the show—and his partner, Rainer. We were mid-season and had just finished a long week, and I somehow made this gorgeous meal on a Saturday night. I remember being in my little house listening to music and drinking a glass of gorgeous red wine. (Always cook with a wine you’d like to have at the table, right, Ina?) The house smelled like winter when Victor and Rainer arrived, and the meal was done. I didn’t have to get up to check anything or stir or sauté—everything had cooked in the oven, and we just sat and ate and talked and laughed.

Since that night I have made this recipe countless times—for small, intimate dinner parties or doubling it for my family at Christmas. And I’ve learned a lot about it through the years. I tried having a butcher cut the meat for me once and won’t do that again; I like my meat more carefully trimmed than just cubed. I know now to watch the bacon carefully (it can go from sizzling to sizzled in a few short seconds), and that the grilled bread dipped in the stew is worth every bite—even if half the table is filled with actors on no-carb diets! No matter what, it is absolutely a winner and gives everyone the feeling of luxury and time and depth of flavor. I haven’t made this for Ina, but would be thrilled to—her recipe is foolproof and there is no one better to share a table with than Ina and Jeffrey!

I wonder what other gems Ina has hiding in plain sight. Sometimes I go through and read her earlier books over again to come up with fresh ideas. Ina’s books, like her beef bourguignon, never ever disappoint.

Ina Garten’s Boeuf Bourguignon

Beef Stew with Red Wine
Serves 6

I never really liked beef bourguignon. After cooking for three hours, the meat was stringy and dry and the vegetables were overcooked. So, I tried to solve the problem and came up with a delicious stew that cooks in an hour and a half. The good news is that it’s even better the second day, so it’s great for entertaining. To make in advance, cook the stew and refrigerate. To serve, reheat to a simmer over low heat and serve with the bread and parsley.

1 tablespoon good olive oil
8 ounces good bacon, diced
2½ pounds beef chuck cut into 1-inch cubes
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 pound carrots, sliced diagonally into 1-inch chunks
2 yellow onions, sliced
2 teaspoons chopped garlic (2 cloves)
½ cup Cognac or good brandy
1 (750-ml) bottle good dry red wine, such as Burgundy
2 to 2½ cups canned beef broth
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature, divided
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 pound frozen small whole onions
1 pound mushrooms, stems discarded, caps thickly sliced

For serving:
Country bread, toasted or grilled
1 garlic clove, cut in half
½ cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley (optional)

Preheat the oven to 250 degrees.

Heat the olive oil in a large Dutch oven, such as Le Creuset. Add the bacon and cook over medium heat for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the bacon is lightly browned. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon to a large plate.

Dry the beef cubes with paper towels and then sprinkle them with salt and pepper. In batches in single layers, sear the beef in the hot oil for 3 to 5 minutes, turning to brown on all sides. Remove the seared cubes to the plate with the bacon and continue searing until all the beef is browned. Set aside.

Toss the carrots, onions, 1 tablespoon of salt, and 2 teaspoons of pepper into the fat in the pan and cook over medium heat for 10 to 12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are lightly browned. Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the Cognac, stand back, and ignite with a match to burn off the alcohol. Put the meat and bacon back into the pot with any juices that have accumulated on the place. Add the wine plus enough beef broth to almost cover the meat. Add the tomato paste and thyme. Bring to a boil, cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid, and place it in the oven for about 1¼ hours, or until the meat and vegetables are very tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from the oven and place on top of the stove.

Combine 2 tablespoons of the butter and the flour with a fork and stir into the stew. Add the frozen onions. In a medium pan, sauté the mushrooms in the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter over medium heat for 10 minutes, or until lightly browned, and then add to the stew. Bring the stew to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes. Season to taste.

Rub each slice of bread on one side with garlic. For each serving, spoon the stew over a slice of bread and sprinkle with parsley.

Recipe reprinted from Barefoot in Paris: Easy French Food You Can Make at Home. Copyright © 2004 by Ina Garten. Photographs by Quentin Bacon. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.

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This Ground Beef Meatball Recipe Is My New Weeknight Dinner Secret Weapon

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I’m not a vegetarian, but I’m definitely not a do-or-die carnivore either. I’ll take a baby steak over a hulking rib eye any day, and most of the time I’ll opt for crispy glazed tofu over either. My meat philosophy is simple: Use meat as a seasoning in a dish, not as the dish. These crispy beef meatballs, which pair ground beef with crunchy chopped walnuts, briny capers, and plenty of herbs, neatly fit the bill. They come together in no time, and are a delicious, economical, all-purpose protein that can round out any otherwise plant-based meal.

Meatballs may have a rep for being stodgy and taking forever to cook, but these crispy little guys are a whole different breed than the spaghetti-dwellers you may have encountered before. (No shade intended—Sunday Supper, I’ll always love you!) I’d even dare to call 2018 ‘The Year of the Meatball’ here at BA, where we like ‘em golf ball-sized and paired with a bright herby sauce. Here’s how these come together.

Sheet Pan Beef Meatballs with Salsa Verde

Before you do anything else, preheat your oven to 425° and arrange a rack in the middle. We’re going to prep two things at once here—the meatball mix and salsa verde—so grab two bowls and grate a garlic clove into each. Finely chop up any mix of herbs that gets you going (I went with dill and basil) and split the pile between the bowls, then do the same for capers. You’ll need to chop up some walnuts too, but save those all for the meatball mix, where they’ll add a fun layer of texture and nutty flavor.

Now it’s time to bring the meatballs together by adding an egg, paprika, salt, oil, along with a cup of panko breadcrumbs. Mix with your hands, then add the beef and continue to mix gently until it’s incorporated but not overmixed. If you work the mixture too much, the meat will become tough and springy, so be gentle. If you want to check your meatball seasoning, now is the time! Pinch off a little piece and crisp it in a skillet to give it a taste. Once you’re happy with the flavors, drizzle some olive oil onto the sheet pan, roll the meatballs into golf ball-sized balls, and into the hot oven they go.

Another thing I love about this recipe: It’s ridiculously fast. These meatballs only need to bake for about 10 minutes or so. Set a timer, and give the pan a shake halfway through to encourage crispy browning on all sides. While the meatballs cook, you can finish the salsa verde by adding lemon zest, lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Don’t be afraid to add more lemon juice or salt if the flavors aren’t quite there—you want a bright, punchy sauce to stand up to the meatballs. When the meatballs are done, transfer them to a platter and serve with that salsa verde on the side for drizzling.

Nobody will fault you for eating these crispy meatballs straight-up, but they’re a versatile ingredient for countless other meals too. Use them to anchor a grain bowl, round out a noodle-y soup, or add some heft to a plate of roasted veggies. Share them with friends, or hoard them all for yourself and eat them for lunch all week. Just know that when the first batch runs out, round two is never that far away.

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Beef Stir-Fry Recipe | Bon Appetit

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Trim any big pieces of fat from beef, then thinly slice across the grain. Place in a medium bowl; season with kosher salt. Using a Microplane, finely grate lemongrass, chile, ginger, and garlic into bowl. Add sesame oil, if using, and brown sugar and toss to combine. Let sit at least 10 minutes or up to 1 hour.

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This Beef Stir-Fry Is The Perfect Way to Send Off Summer | Healthyish

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I love to cook, but, after spending a full day in the Bon Appétit test kitchen, the last thing I need to do is start chopping onions all over again when I get home. That means dinners can be a bit scrappy: reheated leftovers from my weekend prep, fridge-dump salads, or just taking whatever I can find and putting a scoop of cottage cheese on it. It’s a tricky time of day, trying to get dinner together while my kids scheme to avoid bedtime, suddenly intensely curious about what I am cooking, how MY day was, and whether Robin Hood and other favorite characters are “real,” all of which would be cute if they didn’t need to be asleep.

This is a beef stir-fry that I can actually handle cooking from start to finish on a weeknight. I can watch our three-year old demonstrate Ninjago spins while I grate the aromatics for the marinade, and I can trim beans while retaining enough brainpower to decide whether our five-year-old will be allowed a real bow and arrow for his Robin Hood Halloween costume (no). I only truly need to pay attention for a minute while slicing the meat, long enough that they might slip past the kitchen, but short enough that they won’t get far.

The key to slicing the short ribs (these may also be labelled Denver steak depending on your butcher) is to cut thinly across the grain. Chicken (thinly sliced) or fish (cut into chunks) would also work just fine. Put it in a bowl and grate the lemongrass, chile, ginger, and garlic right over the top. Add the sesame oil and brown sugar and toss to combine. Let that sit at least 10 minutes or up to 1 hour.

Meanwhile, prep your veg. I like to slice the green beans in half-ish lengthwise so they cook a bit more quickly. Transfer them to a bowl, and, unless you are into perfection, slice the corn kernels off right into that bowl (a few scatter across the counter, no big deal).

Cook the meat in two batches so each one can get a really good sear, then add the veg, which only need a few minutes to go from raw to vivid and crisp-tender. Add the meat back to the skillet along with the tomatoes and half the basil and cook, tossing everything to let the aromatics in the marinade hit everything in the skillet as they get knocked around.

Serve topped with the rest of the basil, a sprinkle of flakey salt, and lime wedges. It’s a last hurrah of summer flavor with all the bright aromas of lemongrass and ginger on top. Best of all, it doesn’t require a sauce since there is so much flavor in the marinade. My kids know that anyone still awake and skulking around the kitchen has to eat whatever I make, so by the time my wife and I sit down for dinner, they may not be asleep, but they’re definitely in their rooms.

It’s beef stir-fry time:

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Olive oil works great in stir-fry recipes; its sharp grassy notes complements flavors like lemongrass and basil.

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