California vote opens the door for British Columbia to stop changing clocks for Daylight Saving Time

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Time could be ticking on a long-time tradition in British Columbia. Premier John Horgan says that if California goes ahead with sticking on permanent daylight saving time, B.C. could very well follow suit.

On Tuesday, a majority of California voters, nearly 60 per cent, voted in favour to leave the state in daylight saving time all year round.


READ MORE:
B.C. premier says the time isn’t right to get rid of Daylight Saving Time

“There is a long way to go still but I can’t imagine British Columbia can’t go down that route if California chooses to,” said Horgan on Wednesday to Global News.

In order for the clocks to be fixed all year round two-thirds of the members of the California state legislature would have to vote in favour of the change. There would then have to be the support of a majority of the national congress to change the federal law.

WATCH HERE: A week after saying it wasn’t on the radar, the B.C. government says it may be time to consider abandoning Daylight Saving Time






“A two-thirds vote isn’t easy to do, particularly in the United States, and then they would need approval of Congress,” Horgan said.

“It certainly speaks to how much people care about this issue. I have received tens of thousands of emails from British Columbians who want to stay on Daylight Saving time. I said last week that as long as our neighbours, trading partners are changing their clocks, we should too,” said Horgan.


READ MORE:
Scott Thompson: How do we survive falling back after Daylight Saving Time?

Horgan seemingly put the time change issue to bed last week when he told reporters the challenge with stopping the practice of changing the clocks was working with other jurisdictions along the west coast. Oregon and Washington had previously indicated a lack of interest in making a change.

Democratic Rep. Kansen Chu of San Jose said last month that he sponsored the California resolution after his dentist called him to complain about springing forward when clocks are moved up an hour every March. That switch takes away an hour’s sleep in the middle of the night as it shifts an hour of sunlight from the morning to the evening.


READ MORE:
COMMENTARY: Like clockwork, most of the country continues the folly of Daylight Saving Time

Chu said he investigated the issue further and learned the original reason for implementing Daylight Saving Time — to save energy during the First World War — no longer seemed relevant.

Chu said he also came across studies showing an increased risk of car accidents and heart attacks following the spring change when people lose an hour of sleep.

“It’s a public safety measure,” Chu said. “And I don’t know anybody who really enjoys doing this adjustment of their schedule twice a year.”

–With files from the Associated Press

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Daylight Saving Time 2018 ends this weekend. Here’s what you need to know – National

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Starting at 2 a.m. Sunday, clocks roll back one hour in most of Canada as Daylight Saving Time comes to an end for this year.

Daylight Saving Time, which begins in March every year, is a relatively recent invention: northern Ontario’s Port Arthur was the first town in Canada to start changing its clocks twice a year in 1908.


READ MORE:
9 things you didn’t know about DST around the world

The concept was originally proposed by Benjamin Franklin in 1784, but he’s widely thought to have been kidding. The idea came up again in the 1890s and started to pick up steam.

Germany was the first country to implement Daylight Saving Time, starting in 1916. It made the change as a way to cut back on coal costs. Daylight Saving wasn’t widely implemented in North America until 1966, when it was standardized in the U.S. through the Uniform Time Act.

What you should do:

Clocks go back one hour starting at 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 4. When you get up Sunday morning, make sure to change your clocks — and especially your alarms.

Places that don’t have Daylight Saving Time:

Of course, don’t change your clocks if you’re in one of the various parts of Canada that doesn’t observe Daylight Saving Time, which include:

  • Most of the province of Saskatchewan
  • Peace River Regional District, B.C.
  • Fort Nelson, B.C.
  • Creston, B.C.
  • Pickle Lake, Ont.
  • New Osnaburgh, Ont.
  • Atikokan, Ont.
  • Quebec’s north shore

These places aren’t that unique, either — much of the world doesn’t observe Daylight Saving Time. Most African and Asian nations don’t have it, and even the European Union is currently considering abandoning the practice. That would leave it as an almost entirely North American quirk.

What the time change might do to you:

An extra hour of sleep sounds great, right? Unfortunately, like all time changes, it’s likely to have an impact on you.

A Global News analysis of 10 years of car accident data found that nine more pedestrians, on average, are hurt or killed in Toronto during the week following the time change. Various research studies in the U.S. suggest that this is linked to the evening rush hour suddenly going dark.


READ MORE:
More pedestrians hit in the week after fall time change

Getting an extra hour of sleep could also trigger headaches in people who are already prone to them, according to the Canadian Headache Society. The time transition has also been linked to a slight increase in diagnoses of depression and the rate of strokes.

Slowly adjusting your bedtime over a few days, rather than all at once, can help to mitigate the negative effects of a time change, according to Stuart Fogel, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Ottawa.

—With files from Patrick Cain, Kyle Benning, Patricia Kozicka and Dani-Elle Dubé

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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