Soy-Marinated Eggs

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What’s better than a jammy egg? One that’s been sitting in a tangy-salty marinade of chiles, soy, mirin, and vinegar, like this classic star of Korean banchan. The longer you let them sit, the more flavor they’ll pick up, but if you only have an hour, serve egg quarters with some of the pickling liquid drizzled over for extra flavor.

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The Vegan Eggs Substitute That’s So Good I Feel Guilty Eating It | Healthyish

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The egg: versatile, protein-rich, great at any meal, for a snack, and don’t even get me started on its power as a leavener, binder, and emulsifier. You’d think I’d be a two-egg-a-day woman, but the truth is I haven’t had the pleasure of cracking one in a decade. I’ve been a vegan since 2009, and I miss eggs more than anything. I’ve always been a savory- over-sweet breakfast person, but, without eggs, what’s left? I’m plenty familiar with tofu scrambles and chickpea flour omelets, decent visual doppelgängers that don’t really approximate the real thing. And don’t talk to me about savory oats.

Then, a few months ago, my favorite deli began churning out these amazing vegan breakfast sandwiches with something called a JUST egg. I had to know the deal, so I ordered some JUST for myself.

My « egg » arrived in a 12-ounce bottle, frozen and nestled in dry ice. Thankfully it was 100-percent gimmick-free: no carton or artificial shell. The color was the appropriate yellow. I pulled up a suggested recipe and started with a Sunday morning mini scramble. My pan was hot, greased, and ready. I put in a quarter cup and instantly it adhered to the pan just like an egg! The yellow liquid bubbled, changed color, and even stuck to the sides where I hadn’t oiled. I finished my eggs with a sprinkling of sulfur-y Kala Namak salt. How did it taste? Have you ever eaten an egg? I had to check the label twice to make sure what was on my plate didn’t come from a chicken.

Healthy ish Dinner Scramble 04122018

Vegans, rejoice: You too can make a soy-ginger dinner scramble.

Nope, the ingredients are all plant and 98-percent of them are water, mung beans, and canola oil. The real revelation here is that mung bean protein, when isolated from the rest of the bean, tastes and scrambles just like an egg. Welcome to 2019, a time when a vegan frittata is totally possible.

Okay, so JUST eggs could compete against any omelet or scramble but what about in secondary uses like French Toast or in a nice egg wash over a (vegan) turnover? Done and done. Perfectly bouncy, crispy, toasts emerged from the pan, and the turnovers I whipped up were golden brown. Another little bonus about this egg is that, nutritionally, it’s pretty close to the original chicken version.

JUST has yet to conquer a few of eggs’ greatest gifts. It isn’t advisable to go baking cakes, fussing with creme brûlées, or stirring it into salad dressings. But I have faith that day will soon come. In the meantime, I can look forward to working on my French omelet technique and resurrecting breakfast for dinner, which ten-year-old me was super-into. Scrambled JUST eggs, a side of (mushroom) bacon and (coconut) buttered toast. Don’t @ me; it’s delicious.

Buy JUST Egg in select stores and online at Jet.com, $9.

All products featured on Healthyish are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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Peckish Eggs Are Everything We Didn’t Know We Wanted in a Snack | Healthyish

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It hurts for me to even remember, let alone publicly reveal, a period I call Life Before Eggs. But yes, there was a time when those little chicken embryos were just Not. My. Thing. I was particularly opposed to the chalky, crumbly yolks that my young tastebuds associated with garden soil, and I’d beg my my good, protein-peddling Ma for “just the whites, pleeeeaase.”

It wasn’t until recently, when I tried Peckish, that all that changed. These aren’t just any eggs! Peckish—a direct-to-consumer, hard-boiled egg company incubated by Jon Sebastiani’s Sonoma Brands—sells organic, free-range, and certified-humane eggs in very pretty packaging. These eggs are boiled to perfection (okay, so they’re definitely on the well-done side. But who wants UPS to handle your jammy yolks, anyway?). According to VP of Brand Lauren Egan, nerdy chefs closely monitor cooking temperatures from start to finish. The resulting eggs are “exactly how we love to make them at home—not too hard and not too soft,” she says.

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Photo by Chelsea Kyle

Just look at that savory sprinkle.

“But wait a minute,” you’re thinking. “What about those yolks you always hated?” Inside each of their Peck Packs, along with two individually wrapped eggs, comes a container of sprinkles in one of five flavors: Everything (yep, like the bagel), Fried Rice, Rancheros, Salt & Pepitas, and Maple Waffles. You just dunk your egg, bite, and repeat. The toppings are all gluten and refined sugar free, paleo, keto, and Whole30, too. They’re made from things like organic quinoa crispies, roasted pepitas, and dehydrated veggies. And the only sweeteners you’ll ever see are coconut sugar and maple syrup.

Aside from a quick snack, Peckish eggs and toppings are also easily incorporated into (sprinkled on) meals. Egan suggests adding the Fried Rice eggs to a quick ramen or the Everything flavor into a sandwich. “Rancheros on avocado toast is a crowd favorite,” she says.

So sue me: I love hard-boiled eggs now.

Back in Australia, we’d call this pivot a “Steve Bradbury.” It’s is a complex and culturally niche reference. But in this analogy, Peckish is Steve, triumphantly skating from underdog into the gold medal slot. Honestly, you just have to watch it.

Buy it: Peckish eggs are available in multiple local retailers, and via their website.

All products featured on Healthyish are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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Steak and Eggs with Saucy Beans Are What’s For Dinner

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Serious question: Is there any meal better than breakfast for dinner? If you answered yes then I’m sorry but you are wrong. Very wrong. But don’t take it too hard. We all make mistakes. What I have for you here is salvation of sorts. What I have for you here is Steak and Eggs with Saucy Beans.

See, I’m one of those people. The ones who struggle with mornings. I hit snooze twelve times, wake in a panic, throw on whatever sweater I find on the ground, chug a scalding coffee, then sprint out the door as the last train getting me to work on time pulls out of the station. I never have time to eat breakfast. And that makes me very sad. But you know what cheers me up? Yes, you do. Having breakfast for dinner.

Packed full o’ protein and heavy on the flavor, this particular breakfast for dinner is an excellent example of the form. It’s also a serious upgrade on the typical greasy laminated placemat iteration of steak-n-eggs, she of the tough under-seasoned meat and gelatinous scrambies. And making it is so easy that I might even consider waking up a little earli—lol jk. It’s dinner. Let’s talk strategy.

First, you grab a couple of fine New York strip steaks and rub ‘em all over with a fiery blend of hot smoked paprika, Aleppo-style pepper, salt, and black pepper. This is the perfect cheat-rub for making quick pan-seared steak taste like it spent quality time on a grill when it’s too cold to grill outside. Let it sit and soak while you focus on those saucy, saucy beans.

This part is simple: Sauté some shallots, garlic, and fresh cilantro stems (yes, they’re edible and you should never waste them!) until soft. Then add a can of pinto beans. On that subject, here’s some potentially unexpected advice from the Test Kitchen: For the best flavor, skip the “no salt added” beans and opt for a classic pre-seasoned brand like Goya. The beans pick up more flavor the first time they’re cooked (yes, in the factory) and it’s hard to get them to Ideal Saltiness Level once that opportunity’s been passed up. That said, definitely drain and rinse your beans—ain’t nobody got time for that mucous-y, preservative-filled can gloop.

Next, add butter and water (to make up for the missing can gloop—you still need liquid), and let those beans simmer ‘til incorporated and saucy. Then remove them from the heat and stir in the leaves from those cilantro stems you didn’t waste. Sprinkle them with a bit of lime zest and half a lime’s worth of juice. Done. Cover them so they don’t get cold.

Now: Steak, which gets cooked on a skillet (definitely opt for cast iron if you have it) for three minutes on each side. Here’s where things get craaaa-zy: Add a couple of halved limes to your skillet. Yeah. We went there. See, charring citrus is a great way to transform its sharp acidity into something more mellow and sweet. The cooking oil in the pan will suck those flavors right up into the meat, which will then get a double dose once you squeeze those sweet limey juices all over it after plating.

Then come the eggs: Cooked sunny side up in the same skillet until their edges get lacy and brown and perfect. And that is it, folks! Spread the steak on a pretty slab of wood with the cut limes artfully scattered about, and slide an egg atop your plate. And suddenly, you’ll realize something. All those sanctimonious early birds? They can keep their slimy worms. We’ve got steak. And eggs. And the sauciest beans in town.

Get the recipe:

steak-and-eggs-with-saucy-beans.jpg

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This Breakfast Wrap with Merguez and Eggs Will Sustain You All Day

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Are we, as a collective cooking community, taking breakfast-for-dinner seriously enough? Really think about it. Pause and reflect. This is the hot-skillet issue Molly Baz took on when she developed five new dinner recipes that give breakfast-for-dinner the respect it deserves. I would call them restaurant quality recipes, because I’d pay good money for them with unlimited cups of coffee, but that also implies difficulty. And they’re not.

Take, for example, this phenomenal merguez and egg wrap. There are a few individual components here that all come together in the most delicious lavash package: crispy sausage up against jammy hard-boiled egg up against garlicky yogurt up against acidic pickles and onion. And if that isn’t enough, the whole damn wrap then gets griddled in the reserved merguez fat, causing crispy edges and extra sausage flavor while everything inside melds together. MOLLY, YOU BEAUTIFUL BASTARD. THANK YOU.

egg and merguez wraps

Photo by Alex Lau, food styling by Sue Li, prop styling by Kalen Kaminski

My assembly station was not this tidy, but how aspirational!

Here’s how to make it happen on a desperate and dark Monday night:

Boil some water, drop in some eggs. For only 8 minutes, people. We want bright orange, slightly soft yolks, not hard and dried-out yolks. (Honestly that’s a personal preference, you do you.)

While the water’s coming to a boil for the eggs, mix up some yogurt. With lemon juice, salt and pep, grated garlic.

Maybe the eggs are still boiling. Get on that merguez. First, brown the sausage meat in patties for maximum crispy-edged potential. When the pan-side has browned, flip the patties over and then break up the sausage into morsels as the other side cooks through.

Slice some stuff. The eggs, red onion, pickles, herbs.

Assemble your masterpiece. Swoosh that yogurt all over, leaving some room at the edges. Layer on sausage, layer on eggs, layer on the pickles, onion, and herbs. Wrap it up tight. Unless you got small tortillas or flatbreads like I did, in which case, make a taco, you did your best.

The grand finale. This THREE MINUTE extra step yields the greatest breakfast-for-dinner reward, so please DO IT. Heat up that pan again, the one with the merguez fat shimmering and ready for duty, and plop the wrap in, don’t even touch it, until it’s crispy on one side, then flip and repeat. (If your wrap is too small, I highly recommend still frying it open-faced anyway.)

Slice and eat. Hopefully by now you’re in your comfy pants, unfolding the TV tray, and settling in for the best breakfast-for-dinner you’ve ever had. From now on, don’t settle for less.

Get the recipe:

egg-and-merguez-wraps.jpg

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Grain Bowls with Eggs Recipe

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Meanwhile, melt 2 Tbsp. ghee in a small nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add shallot and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until shallot is beginning to brown and crisp around edges, 5–6 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in ginger, mustard seeds, and turmeric. Let cool slightly. Season with salt. Add cucumbers and half of shallot mixture to grains and toss to combine. Add lime juice; season with salt. Transfer grain mixture to a medium bowl. Wipe out skillet.

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Eggs For Dinner Recipe | Bon Appetit

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Melt ghee in a small skillet (preferably nonstick) over medium-low heat. Whisk eggs, mirin (if using), ginger, and soy sauce in a medium bowl until eggs are completely smooth and no visible bits of whites remain. Add to skillet and cook, stirring with a rubber spatula, until large wavy curds form and no wet egg remains, about 2 minutes. Taste and season with salt.

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The Miso Eggs from ‘Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat’ Are a Cool Party Trick

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I molded a handful of soft miso paste around a slippery hard-boiled egg until it looked like something found at the bottom of the ocean. Then I waited.

These miso-cured eggs are one of the breakout recipes, so to speak, from the new four-part show Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat on Netflix, based on Samin Nosrat’s bestselling cookbook of the same title. (Sidenote: Not just any cookbook. This book is a modern classic; it rethinks the ways we learn how to cook. Read it and your cooking will be forever improved. Moving on!)

In the “Salt” episode, Nosrat travels to Japan to dive into salt-making, as well as soy sauce and miso production. When she meets with author Nancy Singleton Hachisu, they make miso-cured eggs, that look both incredibly easy and salty-funky-delicious. They shape the miso into a patty in their palms, then wrap 8-minute hard-boiled eggs in them, wait four hours, remove the miso with their thumbs, and serve the miso-permeated eggs sliced in half with a sprinkle of shichimi togarashi (a powdered spice mix; try it on popcorn too). There’s something about it that immediately inspired this viewer (and many others!) to try it. It’s eggs. Miso. Patience. If anything—a cool party trick.

In Singleton Hachisu’s 2015 book, Preserving the Japanese Way, her recipe for miso-cured eggs, tamago no misozuke, was a logical next step after making soy sauce pickled eggs. I followed along to make mine, and put them in the office mini-fridge to hang out for the afternoon.

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Photo by Kenji Miura

Step 1: Make a patty of miso

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Photo by Kenji Miura

Step 2: Wrap your hard-boiled egg in it.

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Photo by Kenji Miura

Step 3: Really tuck it in.

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Photo by Kenji Miura

Step 4: Pull them from the fridge after 4 hours.

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Photo by Kenji Miura

Step 5: Doctor up and serve!

Though my miso was softer and didn’t form as Play-Doh putty like hers, I did my best. The result of my sloppy version: Salty! After wiping away the miso (which Singleton Hachisu recommends saving and reusing for more eggs or in soup), I cut the eggs in half and shared them with colleagues. The egg whites had gotten firmer and were outlined with a light brown layer from the sunken-in miso; inside the yolk was still gooey. On its own it was sal-ty, but I’s love it in a salad or soup, or with avocado for breakfast like this person did to balance with other flavors. I used a LOT of miso for only two eggs, so I won’t be pulling a tray of more than four miso-cured eggs out at any big parties. I’m no millionaire. But it was still a fun novelty.

In her latest cookbook, Japan there’s a recipe for three-day miso-pickled egg yolks that can be your next experiment. “Pickling in miso ‘cooks’ raw egg yolks and transforms them into creamy, salty, earthy bites,” she writes, and suggests snacking on these with a glass of cold beer or sake. The yolks are dropped into divots in a container lined with miso, then topped with a blanket of more miso. Next level.

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Steak and Eggs with Beans Recipe

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Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in a medium saucepan over medium-low. Cook shallots, garlic, and cilantro stems, stirring often, until softened but not yet browned, about 3 minutes. Add beans, butter, and ¾ cup water. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until beans are saucy, 6–9 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in cilantro leaves. Finely grate some lime zest from one of the lime halves into beans, then squeeze in its juice. Season with salt and pepper. Cover to keep warm.

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Trout Toast with Scrambled Eggs Recipe

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Heat remaining 2 Tbsp. butter in reserved skillet over medium-low. Once butter is foaming, cook egg mixture, stirring with a heatproof rubber spatula in broad sweeping motions, until some curds begin to form but eggs are still runny, about 2 minutes. Stir in crème fraîche and cook, stirring occasionally, until eggs are barely set, about 1 minute.

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