Canadian captured in Syria admits to role in gruesome ISIS execution videos

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A Canadian captured in northern Syria last month has admitted he helped produce ISIS propaganda videos that showed prisoners digging their own graves and being executed, according to a local source.

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Mohammed Abdullah Mohammed, who was detained by the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces on Jan. 13, acknowledged his role in the ISIS videos Flames of War and Flames of War 2, the Rojava Information Centre said.

“Our sources in YPG confirmed that he is the narrator of both FoW [Flames of War] videos,” the group said. The YPG is the Kurdish militia that dominates the SDF alliance fighting ISIS.

The group said he had acknowledged writing the scripts but that it could not yet confirm it’s his voice heard reading them in the videos, although that now seems likely.

WATCH: Canadian ISIS fighter talks about his capture






Shortly after Mohammed was caught in the last patch of ISIS territory, Global News reported he seemed to be the long-sought Canadian narrator of the videos and many of the terror group’s other releases.

His alleged admission came as the government is under pressure to take back and prosecute captured Canadian ISIS members, and the RCMP is struggling to collect enough evidence to charge them.

The U.S. State Department has asked countries to repatriate and put captured ISIS members on trial. A lobby group for the families of those in detention, Families Against Violent Extremism, said 29 Canadians were being held in Kurdish camps and prisons, and two more were still attempting to surrender.

They include women who had married ISIS foreign fighters, and their children, but also several self-admitted foreign terrorist fighters from Toronto and Montreal like Mohammed.


READ MORE:
Narrator of ISIS execution video is Canadian, says captured Mississauga ISIS member

In the English-language Flames of War video, the narrator praised jihadist foreign fighters who had come to Syria from around the world and said they were “chosen by Allah.”

During a scene that showed the mass execution of prisoners lying face-down, he said ISIS was “harsh against the kuffar [non-believers]. This harshness never wavered and was a constant trait of the brothers.”

The 55-minute video ended with a row of kneeling prisoners being shot in the back of the head and tumbling forward into the mass grave they have just dug with shovels.

The same narrator’s voice can be heard in the 2017 video Flames of War 2, which similarly showed prisoners digging their own graves and ends with their execution. The same voice appears to have claimed responsibility for the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris that killed 130.

WATCH: U.S. urging allies to bring home foreign ISIS fighters






But his identity remained a mystery until a captured Canadian ISIS fighter, Muhammad Ali, identified him to Global News last October as an Ontario man who went by Abu Ridwan.

Ali said he believed Abu Ridwan was still alive.

Last month, as Kurdish fighters closed in on the last area of ISIS-held territory, they detained Mohammed Abdullah Mohammed, who told his captors he was a former student at Toronto’s Ryerson University who had joined ISIS in 2013.

A childhood friend subsequently told Canadian terrorism researcher Prof. Amarnath Amarasingam that Mohammed was “Abu Ridwan” and the voice heard in ISIS propaganda.


READ MORE:
Canadian women fleeing ISIS territory surrender to U.S.-backed forces in Syria

The RCMP has been investigating Mohammed, who surrendered following a firefight, but he has not been charged. It’s unclear what weight his admission to his captors could have as evidence in court.

The Canadian open source intelligence group iBrabo has located the site of the mass execution shown at the end of the first Flames of War video and suggested the RCMP treat it as a crime scene for evidence purposes.

A former senior Canadian Security Intelligence Service official, Andrew Ellis, said in a 2016 speech at the Royal Canadian Military Institute that “many” Canadians were active in the ISIS propaganda wing.

“I would argue that that may be equally as dangerous, maybe more, than someone who is joining the military wing. A lot of these young Western adherents to Daesh are put on the frontlines and die very quickly.

“Someone who is working in the propaganda wing can hurt us over and over and over again,” he said.

Stewart.Bell@globalnews.ca

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Louis Riel honoured on anniversary of execution, part of Métis Week celebrations

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Métis Week was held in Edmonton and across Alberta from Nov. 12 to 17.

The week was commemorated with a ceremony at the Alberta Legislature on Friday, on the anniversary of Métis Leader Louis Riel’s execution, or Louis Riel Day.

Coverage of Métis people on Globalnews.ca:


The ceremony, organized by the Métis Nation of Alberta (MNA), paid tribute to the rebel leader who sacrificed his life defending the rights of Métis people.

“He stood for a fair country, is what he stood for. Not only for Métis people, but everyone in Canada. He fought and he died for it, said Audrey Poitras, president of the MNA.

“We think it’s really important that we continue to have people understand. He was a person like all of us.”

The event saw Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson, and federal Minister of Natural Resources Amarjeet Sohi in attendance.

Youth performers, dancers and singers were a large part of the ceremony’s itinerary and young people have become an integral part of their events.

 

“(They are) our future leaders, said Poitras.

“We want to make sure they understand why we do the things we do. Why we believe in what we do. About the history of our people, how we helped build this country, Canada, and this province, Alberta.

“We try to build youth into everything we do now.”

READ MORE: ‘We’re reclaiming our heritage’ — the controversial rise of the Eastern Métis

To explain to the crowd how Riel made his mark on Canadian history, Charles Barner, a grade four student who is part of the Métis Nation of Alberta took to the microphone.

“He formed a provisional government to negotiate the entrance of Manitoba into confederation,” explained Barner.

He spoke about Riel’s monumental achievements, and of his passing.

“Nov. 16, 1885, Louis Riel was hanged in Regina, Saskatchewan.”

Barner also spoke with Global News after the ceremony.

“I think people need to know about our culture and history, the young boy said.

“The Europeans came across to Canada and there was a war. They wanted to take over Canada and Louis Riel said ‘no’.

“He was found guilty and he got hung. He stood up for his country. He didn’t let anything bad happen to it,” said Barner.

READ MORE: New Métis rights tour launches in Winnipeg

The ceremony to honour Louis Riel has grown over the years.

“People and governments are talking to us now. We are moving forward with reconciliation, Poitras said.

“And I think that’s what it takes — more people to stand up and come out.”

Sohi also spoke on behalf of the federal government.

“An essential aspect of overcoming oppression and wrongs of the past, is to learn from and honour our history,” said Minister of Health and Natural Resources Amarjeet Sohi on behalf of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Learning about and understanding Métis people and their relationship with others is why Métis Week is held in Edmonton, and the province.

“We as Métis people are here to work and live with everyone else in this country, and the more we understand each other- the better we can,” Poitras said.

“While we’re promoting and educating who we are as Métis people — we learn from other people who come out to be part of what we’re doing — and that’s really what it’s all about.”

Métis Week celebrations in Edmonton come to a close with a family day celebration at the Edmonton Inn & Conference Centre on Nov. 17.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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