Nous Jeûneurs, street food du monde

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C’EST NOUVEAU – Et de quatre pour cette enseigne qui s’emploie méthodiquement à accompagner les migrations des hédonistes urbains. Cette fois, en plein Sentier, sur deux niveaux.

Genre: et de quatre pour cette enseigne qui s’emploie méthodiquement à accompagner les migrations des hédonistes urbains. Cette fois, en plein Sentier, sur deux niveaux, rafraîchissant et toujours au bon ton d’un ronron en facilité mondialo-méditerranéenne.

Prix: env. 30 €. Plateau mezze (houmous, guacamole…): bravounet. Boulette veggie, sauce yaourt-menthe: pas mal du tout. Blondie (brownie au beurre de cacahuète): carré de partout.

Avec qui? Il ou elle.

Bonne table: tiens, tiens, pourquoi pas au sous-sol.

Service: tout sourire.

Nous Jeûneurs. 41, rue des Jeûneurs (IIe). Tél.: 09 53 11 37 06. Tlj. Métro: Sentier.

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Is It Ever Okay…To Eat the Food Off Your Date’s Plate?

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Welcome to “Is It Ever Okay,” Bon Appetit’s etiquette column. Have a question? Email staff.bonappetit@gmail.com.

How much PDA is too much PDA at a restaurant? —Touchy Trevor

Any. Footsie? Violent, should be illegal. Putting food in someone else’s mouth who isn’t in a high chair? Repulsive. Holding hands across a table. I HATE THAT. GET A ROOM.

Is it okay to eat off your date’s plate? (A hungry guy friend is asking.) —Audacious Adam

How dare you, sir. NO. Unless you’re in a loving, committed relationship and this clause is included IN YOUR WEDDING VOWS, thou shalt not fork a single radish off my plate unless you’ve been invited to. Especially French fries. There’s a three fry rule of fry theft (and only one if steak fries), and after that, you better order a side for yourself. The nerve! This question comes from a place of patriarchal entitlement mixed with some stereotypes about delicate ladies who can’t handle an entire quarter pounder. I’m huffing and puffing. I’ll blow this house of pancakes down! I’M HUNGRY TOO. And don’t you dare ever ask me, “gonna finish that?” I will m u r d e r.

The following date night restaurant scenarios are RED FLAG indicators that the relationship needs to end right here and now:

  • They’re rude to waiters
  • They’re bad tippers
  • They ask “gonna finish that?”
  • They tease you for not drinking
  • They call the bathroom “the little boy’s room”
  • They reveal they’re a starred Yelp reviewer

How do you get strong food tastes out of your mouth before making out on the sidewalk? (And without making it obvious that you anticipated the make out)? —Attagirl Annalee

Am I the only one who finds super minty kisses sort of jarring and dental? Halitosis is unfortunate and that’s a whole other ball game, but just like, food tastes? WHO CARES. I love food! We probably ate the same things and have the same flavored saliva! (Martini-French-fries-mayo if things went as planned.) My first kiss was at the movies and he was eating a huge, bulging, veiny… pickle. It was a pickle juice kiss! Delightful. Things didn’t work out.

SNACK BREAK!

cwar-carlas-date-and-almond-skillet

Alex Lau

Get it? Dates. This almond and date mix gets roasted in a cast iron skillet and it’s pure ROMANCE. The dates get gooey and caramelized, the almonds get toasted, there’s some citrus and herbs in there to keep things interesting, and you can eat it by the handful or smash it onto crusty bread.

What would you make for a Valentine’s Day meal …for one? —Lone Lina

Personally? Nachos. Double layer. Tostitos (REGULAR. NOT SCOOPS), refried beans, shredded cheddar. Jar of pickled jalapeños to apply to each individual chip. But that answer isn’t going to offer the opportunity to plug a Bon Appétit recipe or three. Soooo. In that case. I’d do this easy yet decadent skirt steak with pan sauce with a side of Trader Joe’s frozen hash browns. Drink the rest of the white wine you used in the sauce, on ice. In this scenario, however, you aren’t going to watch Netflix and get all cozy. You’re going to eat that steak and do some laundry, gather all the forms you need for your taxes, pay your credit card bill. Then you have my permission to pay for porn. The high quality stuff. It’s called financial health.

What date number is a burp okay? —Belching Brittany

One if the date’s at a brewery and you do that thing where you cover your mouth and burp under your breath, which I find impossibly sexy, alluring, and mysterious. What are you doing under there? Burping? Oh you sly devil! Get into my bed!

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Photo by Chelsie Craig, Food Styling by Pearl Jones

What’s a good Valentine’s Day cake or dessert? —Jovial Justin

These molten caramel cakes, hands down.

What is your strategy to make sure Valentine’s Day dinner feels rich and indulgent, but not so heavy as to put the damper on any other evening activities? —Caring Ceili

I’m pretty sure you’re asking what dinner will still make you want to have sex afterward. Too heavy a meal, and you’ll just want to lay on your left side and yell at the kids on MasterChef Junior. Too light and you’re what, on a diet now? Here’s the thing. Just make a rich and indulgent meal. I’d like these lamb meatballs, please, with a crispy fennel salad. The problem with feeling gross and bloated is that our portion sizes are too big. Serve dinner on a smaller plate, make a salad, and then here’s my pro move: go for a walk after dinner. It’ll feel all romantic and stuff but it’ll help you digest and you can crop dust the neighbor’s begonias. A few hours later, after you’ve cuddled under the blankets and finished the day’s crossword puzzle, you’ll realize morning sex is better anyway.

That’s all for now, but if you have any etiquette questions on the theme of TRAVELING (or anything else, honestly) or recipe requests, email staff.bonappetit@gmail.com and be too specific. I want the juicy details!

Love, Alex

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Magnà Street Food, pizza napolitaine pliée-roulée

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C’EST NOUVEAU – Une moitié comptoir, moitié couloir, sympathique à singer le Naples des rues dans un bas Pigalle pressé d’avaler comme de cavaler.

Genre: une moitié comptoir, moitié couloir, sympathique à singer le Naples des rues en roulant-pliant des pizzas tout terrain aux lèvres de ce bas Pigalle pressé d’avaler comme de cavaler. Cause? Effet? La pâte souffre d’un four à la cuisson parfois trop précipitée.

Prix: entre 7,50 et 16,50 € la pizza. Pizza antica mortadella a portafoglio (fior di latte, salame rosa, pesto pistache, huile d’olive infusée à la bergamote): riche, riche. Pizza rotolo spaccatelle: tient au corps. Cheese misu: hybride (vraiment) entre le cheese cake et le tiramisu.

» LIRE AUSSI – Les meilleures pizzas de Paris

Avec qui? Un crapahuteur.

Bonne table: en balade dans le quartier de la Nouvelle Athènes.

Service: à fond.

Magnà Street Food. 48, rue Notre-Dame-de-Lorette (IXe). Tél.: 01 44 63 89 09. Tlj sf dim. Le soir, du mer. au ven. Métro: Saint-Georges.

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Libshop, street food libanaise aux Halles

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C’EST NOUVEAU – Une échoppe pour les faims nomades, qui bricole un brave Liban d’entre box et plateaux.

Genre: plutôt taillée pour les faims nomades, une échoppe qui, sans casser des briques (même pas celles de son décor), bricole un brave Liban d’entre box et plateaux. Amusante variation de street pitas (chawarma, veggie, falafel, boulettes…) faciles à mâchouiller.

Prix: selon les formules, entre 13,50 et 22 €. Chawarma de poulet: brouillon mais pas mauvais. Pita falafel: pas mal roulée.

Avec qui? Léa Salamé.

Bonne table: collé-serré et donc, autant se faire livrer.

Service: d’ailleurs, à la caisse.

Libshop. 96, rue Saint-Denis (Ier). Tél.: 01 42 33 41 07. Tlj. Métro: Étienne Marcel.

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Come for the Serenity, Stay for the Food: the Majestic Resort That Has It All Included

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Imagine for a moment that you’ve just set foot on a pristine vacation property. The sun is warm as you step outside to find a cerulean pool surrounded by lounge chairs and wide-brim straw umbrellas. Hammocks sway in rhythm with the palm trees. Cabana beds line the shore of powdery white sand where guests are sipping cocktails and sharing fresh tapas.

You pinch yourself. Is this paradise? You could call it that. Excellence Playa Mujeres, situated just 25 minutes north of Cancun, is an all-inclusive, adults-only luxury resort. It features seven swimming pools and a variety of spacious rooms and suites, including Swim-Up Suites, which boast a private terrace and direct access to the pool, or a Two-Story Rooftop Terrace Suite, which has its own plunge pool and breathtaking views over the resort. The main stage theater presents nightly entertainment, and sea kayaks, paddle boards, and snorkeling gear are sure to keep guests busy by day.

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And then there’s the food. There are 10 gourmet restaurants, a snack grill just steps from the ocean, and 11 premium-stocked bars with pool- and beach-side locations. No matter your culinary preference, there are premium options for everyone. From inventive Indian food at Basmati to fresh sashimi at Spice, decadent French cuisine at Chez Isabelle to modern Mexican at Agave, the dining options at Excellence Playa Mujeres offer international flavors by innovative chefs in a space that is, simply put, pristine. Oh, and 24-hour room service is included; you could tour the globe without leaving the property––or your suite.

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At Agave, take advantage of your location and relish the authentic Mexican dishes like Alambre, made of pork leg strips prepared with onions, poblano chili pepper, bacon, light beer, lemon juice, and Oaxaca cheese. Though Tex-Mex favorites like burritos and fajitas are just as memorable. Dine under the moonlight in an hacienda-style courtyard if you choose, where the sound of tableside mariachis will carry down along the shore.

There are multiple restaurants at which to dine al fresco, including Las Olas, where you can grab an easy bite by the beach, or The Grill, crafters of fine American cuisine. For a casual à la carte lunch, enjoy a freshly prepared salad, like the seared tuna salad tossed with arugula, green tomatoes, and coriander. For something more decadent (because who said lunch couldn’t be as opulent as dinner?), try a burger like the Oscar, a beef and crab burger with asparagus au gratin on buttered French-toasted brioche. Come dinner, enjoy these and more with a menu full of fresh fish, hearty steak, and unique pasta favorites like mushroom agnolotti in ham broth.

If your heart sings for seafood––you’ve come to the right place––don’t miss a meal at The Lobster House, situated in an open-air thatch-roof palapa that bridges the main pool. Unlike most all-inclusive resorts, Excellence Playa Mujeres offers lobster within its included benefits. Whether you prefer the lobster and jicama salad with orange vinaigrette and garden herbs, lobster risotto marinated with white wine and Parmesan cheese, or a traditional grilled or steamed lobster with your selection of sauce, this is an optimal destination for fresh fish and your favorite crustaceans.

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Excellence Playa Mujeres has a world-class team of chefs with experience throughout the Caribbean, but they also know their way around all types of cuisines, as evidenced by the global fare that delights guests throughout their stay.

At Toscana, be transported to Tuscany with dishes like tagliatelle with tomato, broccoli, capers, olives, lemon, and basil; saltimbocca; or salmon with grappa sauce and truffle oil, all made with fresh ingredients and artfully prepared to five-star standards. Try Barcelona for Spanish and Mediterranean fare featuring everything from gazpacho to paella, thoughtfully crafted tapas to indulgent lobster cannelloni. Or you might find yourself wandering Le Marais in Paris when you visit Chez Isabelle. From the escargot to the grilled beef medallions served with red wine, black pepper, and Bearnaise, this French bistro is proud to live up to its culinary heritage. The live music performed nightly further enhances the Parisian sensibility, as well as the romance.

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Crossing continents, Spice elevates Asian flavors from Japan, China, Vietnam, and Thailand with exotic favorites made fresh, like Thai green curry or nigiri. The elegant atmosphere is perfect for date night before or after a show at The Main Stage Theater. Coming in with a group of friends? Try the full Teppanyaki menu. Over at Basmati, it won’t be difficult to shift your focus to the delights of north-west Indian flavors when you smell the fragrant aroma of spices from the tandoor oven that fills the room. Here, chefs serve artful iterations of paneer, daal, and vindaloo dishes with a variety of rice and naan, too.

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For something a little smaller––maybe a glass of wine and tapas before dinner––stop into Flavor Market. The in-house sommelier can help create a memorable pairing that might have you stopping back in at the end of the night. And on the days you can’t stand to miss the big game, because vacation is the prime place to watch a championship series, head to Sports Bar to enjoy elevated pub favorites while you follow along on the big screen.

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No matter what flavors your taste buds prefer, which kind of cocktails you like best, or what mood you’re in, there is an option for every kind of food lover at Excellence Playa Mujeres. And the best part—it’s all included. From the moment you arrive, your most difficult decision will be whether to dine at the beach or the pool. But let’s be honest––you can do it all.

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Fast Casual Restaurants’ Recipes: Make the Food That You Just Spent Your Whole Lunch Break Waiting in Line For | Healthyish

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This story is part of the Healthyish 22, the people changing the way we think about wellness. Meet them all here.

If you’ve bought a grain bowl anytime in the past few years, you know that fast-casual restaurants across the country are thinking about their sourcing in all kinds of innovative ways, and we’re all eating better as a result. We tapped three fast-casual chefs and restaurant owners for their recipes that are as good for the planet as they are for your lunch.

Farm Burger’s Sunnyside Burger with Salsa Verde

When Jason Mann was a rancher, he noticed that most of the buyers for grass-fed beef were fine-dining restaurants looking for specific cuts, inevitably leaving farmers with lesser-known cuts that they couldn’t sell. Mann found the solution to this dilemma in the humble burger. Farm Burger—which launched in 2010 and now has 12 locations—sources local grass-fed whole cattle that are broken down in-house. Here, burgers (like the ever popular Sunny Side) are ground from a « whole carcass blend » that includes anything from chuck to flank to sirloin. Offal goes into specials, and fat is rendered to create tallow butter that the burgers are cooked in. Jamie Ager, a fourth-generation farmer at Hickory Nut Gap Farm in North Carolina which sells to Farm Burger, calls the restaurant’s approach « a more holistic way of looking at the market. »

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What’s better than a griddled burger with the crispiest exterior? One that comes sandwiched between a vibrant tomatillo salsa and topped with a runny fried egg. Most domestic grass-fed beef includes cattle that also eat some grain; the meat is not too lean or “grassy” and makes for a very satisfying burger. This recipe is from Farm Burger.

SEE RECIPE

Homegrown’s Grilled Chicken with Quinoa and Matcha Dressing

After working at Per Se and Gramercy Tavern, Michaela Skloven wanted to bring that same sourcing-obsessed mentality to the fast-casual space. When she became the executive chef at Homegrown, a sandwich shop that launched in Seattle in 2009 and now has eight locations, she started a half-acre organic farm to grow produce—like the cucumbers and cherry tomatoes that go into this chicken and avocado bowl. Homegrown staff are invited to spend time working on the farm so they can see first-hand where the food comes from. « The more respect they have for the food, the less likely people are to do something like throw away a tomato, » Skloven says. « That’s how we change the whole food landscape. »

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The dressing on this bowl is a green goddess 2.0, with matcha adding an earthy undertone to the whole dish. Ceremonial is the highest grade of matcha and is made for drinking from the youngest tea leaves. Culinary matcha is still high-quality but has a more robust flavor, allowing it to shine through when combined with other ingredients. This recipe is from Homegrown.

SEE RECIPE

Cava’s Black Lentil and Harissa-Roasted Veggie Bowl

Hearty, nutrient-heavy, and endlessly versatile, lentils were a staple for Dimitri Moshovitis, who grew up in Greece. So back in 2006, when he cofounded Cava (which now has 74 locations across the East Coast, California, and Texas), Moshovitis saw them as an obvious base for the Mediterranean spot’s bowl-centric menu. He came across black beluga lentils from Timeless Natural Food, a company based in rural Montana, and was impressed by the varietal’s rich flavor. But he was more excited to learn that these lentils are enriching the nutrient density of large swaths of land in Montana, a state whose agriculture has historically been dominated by cereal grains that can deplete the soil. Win-win.

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This filling, endlessly riffable bowl is perfect with roasted sweet potatoes, but any hardy vegetable you have on hand would be just as delicious. Try delicata squash, cauliflower, or eggplant. This recipe is from Cava.

SEE RECIPE

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Why saving money on food is ‘definitely a challenge’ for millennials

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When Leslie Hacker began taking a closer look at her finances recently, she noticed she was spending about $1,000 on food each month.

« It seems like a lot, but when I did the math, that’s about 35 dollars a day, which doesn’t seem that crazy anymore to be honest, » she says.

Eating out, ordering in. Throw in a bagel here, a coffee there, and it all adds up.

« It’s definitely a challenge for people my age to save on food. »

At 28, Hacker is a millennial, defined as anyone born between 1980 and 2000. Saving money is a problem for her generation and experts say a big reason is how much millennials spend on eating out and ordering in.

Hacker works in social media marketing, which makes it even harder, she says, to save on food.

« All day I’m seeing these food pictures online and I’m like, ‘I want to try this and I want to try that!' » she tells CBC Toronto.

Leslie Hacker, a millennial foodie living in Toronto, says besides convenience, food apps like UberEats and SkipTheDishes allow her to try a wide range dishes from many great restaurants in the city. (Kelda Yuen/ CBC News)

In the age of smartphones, access is easier than ever with popular food apps like UberEats and SkipTheDishes bringing a hot meal to your door in minutes.  But the convenience comes at a cost.

« There’s the delivery fee — $5.00 to $7.50, I find, is the usual delivery charge. And then you have to tip the drivers. »

Despite that, Hacker says she still uses the apps at least a few times a week because « as a single person, it’s harder to cook, I find. There’s less motivation. Maybe when I have a family, things will be different. »

Paycheque to paycheque

Jessica Moorhouse, a Toronto-based millennial money expert is noticing many of her well-paid millennial clients are living from paycheque to paycheque because they are overspending on food.

Some, like Hacker, are spending  $500 to $1,000 dollars a month.

« Most of the time when I’m talking to clients, I’m like, ‘So you’re spending $500 on eating out every month, are you happy with that?’ and most of the time they are like, ‘No! I wish I could use that money towards my emergency fund, paying off debt, or go on an amazing trip! »‘

She says the first thing she tells her clients is to track their spending for three months to identify patterns and problem areas, then they can « start taking steps to fix it. »

Moorhouse says there is no « right or wrong answer » when it comes to how much you should be spending on food, but « 10 to 20 per cent of your gross income… is a good starting point. »

Millennial money expert Jessica Moorhouse says many of her clients opt for the more expensive options of ordering in or dining out because they don’t have time to go grocery shopping and cook. (John Grierson/ CBC News)

A millennial herself, Moorhouse, 32, says she definitely notices her generation is spending more money on food than their parents, but she understands why.

« I think it’s because our lifestyles are very different. A lot of us are working full time and we have a side hustle, or we’re busy on the weekends, » she said. 

« We’re just go, go, go all the time. We’re in that crunch time in our lives whereas Gen Xers and baby boomers, the kids may be out of the house (and) they’ve got a little bit more time. »

No time to cook

« I feel like I’m always worried about not having time to cook, » 21-year-old Parnian Dolati said.

As a full-time student, Dolati says she’s often too busy for the kitchen. 

« I should be spending the money on making my own food but I don’t. »

Richard Banyard, 32, is a millennial who does cook, and says it saves him a lot of money.

He told CBC Toronto he spends about $20 to $30 on food each week, which adds up to between $80 and $120 a month.

« It’s the value of knowing how to make simple meals. I know people who don’t even know how to cook an egg. [They] don’t cook at all, so they spend most of their money on take-out. »

Finding a middle ground

For time-starved millennials who don’t have time to grocery shop or prepare food, Moorhouse suggests meal-kits as a good option to cut costs.

« That’s where those kind of delivery service meal kits come in… They do the hard lifting for you. They have all the ingredients and all you have to do is put it together. If you have 15 or 30 minutes, which everyone does, you’ll have time to make your own meal. »

And the cost?

« It’s way cheaper. For instance, with Chef’s Plate (an Etobicoke-based meal kit company), a kit starts at $8.99 (including delivery). It’s really good in terms of being a middle ground if you’re looking for something to help you with your budget, eat healthy, and help you with those time constraints. »

Hacker says she can’t see herself deleting food apps as Moorhouse suggests. But she is looking for ways to save money, such as cooking more often and dining in or ordering from less expensive restaurants. (John Grierson/ CBC News)

Hacker says she opts for the meal kit option once in a while.

 « I don’t use it every week, but I find it helps. »

She also says she is trying to cook something every other day in order to save money.

For those who really want to save though, Moorhouse suggests going cold turkey.

« Seriously, if you want to save money, delete those apps. »

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Rome’s Best Food Neighborhood Is San Lorenzo—Here’s Where to Go

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There’s a lot to love about Rome. All the textbook cacio e pepe. More silky gelato than you can eat. But I’m constantly wandering back to San Lorenzo, the trapezoidal wedge along the east side of the city. Located outside of Rome’s ancient walls, it’s just beyond reach for travelers squeezing their visit down to a few days. But after living in the city for the last 16 years and becoming obsessed with its food and drink culture, I now make regular treks across town to visit this district, which happens to be named after Saint Lawrence, the patron saint of chefs and cooks.

San Lorenzo has been one of Rome’s liveliest (and most delicious) districts for the past century and, unlike sleepier nearby hoods that feel like you’ve stepped into a museum, it’s still going strong, thanks to the abundance of natural wine bars, busy trattorias, and on-point pizzerias. Visit the neighborhood any night of the week and you’ll find its streets, sidewalks, and squares flooded with diners and drinkers (and more than a few hash dealers) late into the night.

But San Lorenzo has much more than just nightlife. In fact, you can spend a whole day grazing. Case in point: Just look at my recent cross-town trips. Here’s how to map out a perfect day of eating, drinking, and wandering through the area. Maybe just wear some stretchy pants.

10:30 a.m. – Caffeinate the Italian way at Bar Marani

I kick off the day with an espresso (or as they say in Rome, caffè), cappuccino, or caffè corretto (that’s espresso spiked with a shot of grappa or amaro, you’re welcome). It feels like you’ve gone back in time at this time capsule of a cafe, where a zinc bar, formica floor, and dusty pennants are straight out of the ’60s. But you feel it even more so when ordering a drink: Make sure you follow the proper protocol by paying for it at the register first, then taking your receipt to the barista who will hook you up. You can stand at the counter, but my move is to sip my drink in the pergola-covered courtyard, with its view of the bell tower of Santa Maria Immacolata church.

 

After all that pasta you’ve been putting away, you need something green, right? Look no further than the San Lorenzo market, where the stalls are stocked with seasonal produce, mainly from Lazio and southern Italy. Here you’ll get a crash course in Roman ingredients: pruned artichokes, trimmed chicory, and persimmons so ripe they are nearly bursting out of their skin.

 

You’ll have to kill some time before lunch because San Lorenzo’s restaurants stick to traditional operating hours, opening from around 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. for lunch and 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. for dinner (don’t expect to sit anywhere for a proper meal any time in between). And this storied cemetery just might be the best place to digest for an hour or so. The family mausoleums and monumental tombs are works of art, hewn from limestone and granite and surrounded by cypress groves and umbrella pines that lighten the otherwise somber mood.

 

1 p.m. – Do sushi, yes, sushi at Kiko

In front of the cemetery is Piazzale Verano and on the south side of the town square, you’ll find this gem of a restaurant. Here chef Atsufumi Kikuchi crafts some of the city’s best sushi. He’s been honing his skill for the last 30 years and built a cult following at his previous Roman sushi spot Sushi Ko, also in San Lorenzo, which closed in 2014. I know what you’re thinking: “I want carbonara.” Me too. But I also want delicate slices of locally caught amberjack and shi drum paired with perfectly seasoned rice. Don’t pass it up.

 

3 p.m. – Cram in a second lunch at Tram Tram

A few blocks southeast, Mamma Rosanna Di Vittorio holds court at Tram Tram, a spartan, sunny trattoria loved for its comfort food—and named for the public transport that rattles the whole bar when it passes along the rails outside. The menu is a mix of cuisines from her mother’s native Puglia, which focuses on seafood and olive oil-spiked vegetables, and her own hometown of Rome, which leans on lamb, guanciale, and offal. Think dishes like a casserole of rice with mussels, simmered bitter greens with fava bean puree, pillowy gnocchi tossed in a mutton ragù, and crisp puntarelle dressed with an anchovy vinaigrette.

 

5 p.m. – Fight off the urge to nap at Giufà

Giufà is a student- and family-friendly bookstore and cafe serving coffee, tea, wine, and cocktails to keep you awake at this point in the day. The shelves are mostly stocked with graphic novels and political tomes, all in Italian, but it’s a mellow spot for hanging out and getting caffeinated before hitting San Lorenzo’s noisy bars and streets.

 

6:30 p.m. – Discover craft beer at Artisan

Four years in business and this craft beer pub is still going strong. (Just look to the constant crowd of smokers outside.) Inside, ’90s hip hop accompanies 12 taps of rotating European and American brews. Keep an eye out for local (and I mean local) beers, like hoppy saisons and IPAs from Jungle Juice, brewed less than two miles away in the Mandrione neighborhood.

 

Keep the carb-positive vibes going and head across the street to Farinè, the black sheep of Roman pizzerias. (It breaks from Rome’s thin-crust tradition with its thick-rimmed pies.) Go for the marinara—pizza in its purest, simplest form—with tomato, oregano, and garlic scattered all over a chewy, bubbled base of dough that’s been leavened for up to 72 hours.

 

10 p.m. – Drink naturale at Il Sorì

Want something to wash down a day’s worth of eating? Two blocks from Farinè sits this natural wine bar, where owner Paky Livieri plays the consummate host. He spends his nights plucking bottles of traditional and natural French and Italian wines from floor-to-ceiling shelves and pouring them for discerning drinkers. The short and simple food menu features cold and hot plates, including some of the freshest buffalo mozzarella around. But the reason you’re here is to drink wines that fetch a premium in the States, like Damijan Podversic’s Ribolla Gialla, an organic white wine that gets some skin contact and has hints of jasmine and chestnut honey, and Emidio Pepe’s Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo, a berry scented rosé we could drink all night long.

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Orange juice may get squeezed out of Canada’s revised food guide

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Orange juice may not be part of your balanced breakfast much longer, at least according to Canada’s Food Guide.

Health Canada is proposing a change to a decades-long policy that equated half a glass of 100 per cent juice to a serving of fruits or vegetables.

« Health Canada’s proposed recommendations are for plain water as the beverage of choice, to help reduce sugars intake, » Health Canada spokesperson Geoffroy Legault-Thivierge said in an email to CBC News. 

Critics say there is too much sugar in a glass of juice – even if it’s from natural sources – because a portion contains more fruit than the average person would normally eat in a sitting.

PepsiCo’s Tropicana, for example, has boasted about « squeezing 16 oranges into each 59-ounce [1,700 ml] carton. »

But how many oranges does one person need?

Canada’s Food Guide currently equates a 125 ml serving of 100 per cent juice to one serving of fruit or vegetables. (Health Canada/UN Food and Agriculture Organization)

« Health Canada can say all they want that half a glass of juice [125 ml] is a serving size, but nobody is going to follow that, » said Alissa Hamilton, author of Squeezed: What You Don’t Know About Juice

« No consumer considers that a serving … a 12-ounce [355 ml] bottle is what consumers are used to considering as a single serving. »

Beyond portion control, Hamilton said the sugar in juice is digested differently than that of fruit. 

« Whole fruit has fibre, which slows down the metabolism of the sugar, » she said. « When you’re drinking the juice without the fibre, you get an insulin spike, and when you have too much insulin circulating in your blood, that’s a precursor to diabetes. »

« The other thing about fibre is that it fills you up, » she said. « There’s nothing to fill you up with the juice. In fact, it stimulates appetite, versus fibre, which suppresses appetite. »

Between 2011 and 2017, Canadian consumption of juice reportedly declined 15 per cent. (Jill English/CBC)

Big Juice lobbying efforts

Sylvain Charlebois, a Dalhousie University professor specializing in food policy, said the food guide has an impact on what Canadians eat.

« When you visit faculties or universities where there’s a nutrition program or where we train dietitians … the starting point is the food guide, » he said. « It is a conversation starter when it comes to nutrition and diet. »

As the Globe and Mail reported, the juice industry is fighting to remain part of that conversation, with the Canadian Beverage Association – an organization funded by Coca-Cola and PepsiCo – making its case to federal ministers and decision-makers « more than 50 times » last year. 

« Canadians are not overconsuming 100 per cent juice, » Canadian Juice Council spokesperson Jeff Rutledge said in a statement to CBC News. « Canadians – including children and youth – are already not meeting minimum recommended intakes for fruits and vegetables. 100 per cent juice can play a key role in helping to meet daily nutrient requirements. » 

Food distribution and policy expert Sylvain Charlebois says Canadians’ nutritional decisions are affected by the food guide. (David Laughlin/CBC)

Consumers a step ahead

But the proposed new food guide is actually mirroring existing consumer behaviour. 

Between 2011 and 2017, market intelligence agency Mintel reports Canadian consumption of juice went down 15 per cent.

Food and beverage industry analyst Joel Gregoire said it can be pegged to concerns about health. 

« Number one I would say is sugar content, and concerns about sugar content, » he said. « If you look over time, attitudes toward sugar have hardened. »

Food and beverage industry analyst Joel Gregoire says Canadians have changed their approach to juice consumption due to health concerns. (Jean-François Bisson/CBC)

Light on fruit

Those attitudes aren’t hurting all juice-makers. 

It’s actually helped Toronto juice entrepreneurs Emma Knight, Anthony Green and Hana James.

Emma Knight, Co-founder of Greenhouse Juice Co., says their most popular juices supplement sugary fruits with vegetables. (Jill English/CBC)

Their Greenhouse Juice Co. is capitalizing on reducing sugary fruits in their cold-pressed juices, and supplementing them – or sometimes replacing them entirely – with vegetables. 

« In our most popular juices, vegetables really form the core of the juice, » Knight said.

She said Greenhouse supports the principles of the proposed new food guide, even if it means removing juice.

« We would never advocate taking fibre out of your diet, » she said.

« Juice, as a companion to that, is a really cool way to get more of the nutrients from vegetables into your day. »

The new version of Canada’s Food Guide is expected to be finalized later this year.

With files with David Common

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How to Buy All the Ceramics in the Feel Good Food Plan | Healthyish

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Our Instagram DMs have spoken, and the people want to know: What are those ceramics making the Feel Good Food Plan look so damn good? Well, creative director Michele Outland worked with prop stylist Kalen Kaminski to source thoughtfully made dishes from ceramicists like Mondays and LRNCE that echoed the vibrant, plant-forward recipes. « Kalen pulled a wonderful selection of earthy yet modern ceramics, and we divided each week of the plan into a color palette—one with warm tones like mustards and oranges, and one with cooler tones like inky and watery blues, » says Outland. The result is a collection like you might find in your coolest friend’s home. But, hey, why not be your own coolest friend? Here’s how to buy the bowls, plates, and platters that brought the Feel Good Food Plan to life.

All products featured on Healthyish are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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