Body recovered from southeast Calgary house levelled in explosion

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A body has been recovered from a southeast Calgary house destroyed in a weekend explosion, police confirmed  Monday. 

The fiery explosion occurred in the community of Douglas Glen around 4:20 a.m. MT Sunday.

Calgary police have taken over the investigation but would not comment further on the case. 

Neighbours said the owner of the home is out of the country, but someone who had been renting it was unaccounted for.

Calgary fire department spokesperson Carol Henke said more than 25 calls were made to 911 in the early morning hours Sunday.

Henke said crews called to the 300 block of Douglas Glen Close S.E. found one home destroyed and at least two others damaged. 

One home was levelled and several others were damaged by an apparent explosion in the southeast Calgary community of Douglas Glen early Sunday morning 0:27

« Some callers were several blocks away, » Henke said Sunday. She said crews found a « fully involved house fire with flames spreading to neighbouring residences. » 

Strong winds and cold temperatures hampered efforts to get the flames under control. 

It was –17 C at the time and winds were gusting up to 40 km/h, according to Environment Canada.

« The debris pattern around the neighbourhood would indicate there was an explosion, » Capt. Paul Frederick of the Calgary fire department said Sunday.

Henke is asking anyone who has photos or videos linked to the fire to email them to her

A map showing the community of Douglas Glen in southeast Calgary. (CBC)

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Trump announces ‘national emergency’ in bizarre White House appearance

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WASHINGTON—He boasted that he was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize, then complained that he wouldn’t win.

He said he doesn’t know far-right pundit Ann Coulter, then said he “hardly” knows her, then said he used to talk to her, then said she’d be very nice to talk to.

He contradicted his chief trade negotiator on negotiations with China. He promoted North Korea as an ideal location for economic development. He uttered a series of lies and misleading statements about immigration, saying it was everyone else who was lying.

And he said he didn’t actually need to declare the national emergency he was speaking in the Rose Garden to declare.

In a rambling, defensive and thoroughly bizarre appearance on the White House grounds on Friday, U.S. President Donald Trump made an unfocused stream-of-consciousness case for his immigration emergency while also musing at length about a variety of related and unrelated topics.

In arguably the strangest moment of the morning, he appeared to undermine his case that an emergency is necessary.

“I could do the wall over a longer period of time. I didn’t need to do this. But I’d rather do it much faster,” he said. He repeated: “I just want to get it done faster.”

Democrats immediately seized on Trump’s remarks.

“Mr. President, how can this possibly be an national emergency if you’re saying you don’t need to do it? Unreal,” Democratic Senate leader Chuck Schumer said on Twitter.

Trump also signed into law on Friday a spending deal reached by Democrats and Republicans to fund security initiatives on the Mexican border. Trump was dissatisfied with the deal because it included less than $1.5 billion for about 55 miles of border barriers, much less than the $5.7 billion and 234 miles he had demanded for the giant wall he had repeatedly promised Mexico would pay for.

Trump is seeking to use the emergency declaration to seize money Congress had allocated to other areas of government and use it for the wall. The New York Times reported Friday that his team is looking at taking $3.6 billion budgeted for military construction, $2.5 billion from anti-drug projects and $600 million from an asset forfeiture fund.

Though presidents have broad authority to declare emergencies, there has never been an emergency declared so a president could pay for his controversial initiative with money not approved by Congress for that purpose.

Democrats and some Republicans have called Trump’s plan an unconstitutional abuse of power. Trump suggested there was a double standard for him, saying that “nobody cares” when other presidents declare emergencies.

And he dismissed concerns about his plan to grab money that had been allocated to the military.

“Some of the generals think that this is more important. I was speaking to a couple of ’em, they think this is far more important than what they were going to use it for,” he said, not naming them. “I said, ‘What were you going to use it for?’ I won’t go into details, but didn’t sound too important to me.”

Trump said it would be easy to win the court challenge that is almost certain to be filed, since he is declaring the emergency over a “virtual invasion” of drugs, gangs and human traffickers.

But he also said he thought he might well lose in the initial case, then again on appeal. Speaking in a singsong voice as he offered a series of unusual predictions about the next steps in the case, he said it was only at the Supreme Court where he hoped to get a “fair shake.”

The state of California and independent organizations have said they plan to sue.

“President Trump is manufacturing a crisis and declaring a made-up ‘national emergency’ in order to seize power. This ‘emergency’ is a national disgrace — and the blame lays solely at the feet of the president. Our message to the White House is simple: CA will see you in court,” Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom said on Twitter.

As at previous immigration speeches, Trump invited the mothers of people killed by unauthorized immigrants, known as “angel moms,” to attend this one. When he was asked to respond to critics who say he is manufacturing this supposed crisis, he turned to the women and said, “What do you think? You think I’m creating something? Ask these incredible women.”

Trump was similarly dismissive of immigration-related data.

Rejecting his own government’s conclusion that most drugs that come in through Mexico are smuggled through legal ports of entry rather than unwalled desert, he declared that this was “all a lie.”

Rejecting official data that shows the number of apprehensions at the southwest border is less than a third what it was two decades ago, Trump said, “We have far more people trying to get into our country today than probably we have ever had before.”

Rejecting studies that show illegal immigrants commit crimes at a lower rate than native citizens, Trump said, “You don’t really believe that stat, do you? Do you really believe that stat?”

And rejecting human trafficking experts who have said that a large percentage of victims come through legal ports of entry, Trump said that this is impossible, since border officers would notice “three women with tape on their mouth.” Experts say victims are usually tricked or coerced into crossing, not physically restrained.

Trump himself was critical of Democratic predecessor Barack Obama for bypassing Congress with unilateral action on immigration, tweeting in 2014: “Repubs must not allow Pres Obama to subvert the Constitution of the US for his own benefit & because he is unable to negotiate w/ Congress.”

Asked about this on Friday, Trump said the current situation is different — because he is taking unilateral action after making an inadequate deal with Congress, not after making no deal.

“I went through Congress, I made a deal. I got almost $1.4 billion when I wasn’t supposed to get $1 — not $1. ‘He’s not going to get $1,’ he said, not saying who he was quoting. “Well, I got $1.4 billion. But I’m not happy with it.”

Daniel Dale is the Star’s Washington bureau chief. He covers U.S. politics and current affairs. Follow him on Twitter: @ddale8

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Average Canadian house price fell 5.5% in the past year, realtor group says

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The average price of a Canadian home has fallen by 5.5 per cent to $455,000 over the past 12 months, the Canadian Real Estate Association said Friday.

The group that represents 125,000 realtors across the country says sales were higher in January than in December, but prices still sank compared to a year ago.

« Homebuyers are still adapting to tightened mortgage regulations brought in last year, » CREA president Barb Sukkau said.

More to come

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Firefighters rescue several people from Hamilton house fire – Hamilton

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Several tenants of a downtown Hamilton apartment building have been rescued by firefighters.

Fire crews were called to a two-and-a-half storey residence at 86 Wellington Street South just before midnight Friday where they encountered heavy smoke and fire on the first and second floor.


READ MORE:
Investigation underway into cause of house fire in east Hamilton

Deputy Fire Chief John Verbeek says the tenants in the ground floor apartments had already evacuated the house by the time firefighters arrived on scene but he says there were still tenants on the upper floors.

The remaining tenants were rescued and five were treated at the scene by paramedics. One tenant was taken to hospital with smoke inhalation.

Verbeek says five dogs were also rescued from the building, however, one did not survive.

Damage is estimated at $295,000.

The Ontario Fire Marshall is investigating the cause.

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© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Tenants occupy damaged Junction-area house rather than risk losing affordable housing

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Deborah Savage is standing in her apartment more than three weeks after a fire at the house, looking up at a hole cut in the wall of her living room and waiting for police to walk through the door.

The sun will set in a few hours and already frigid temperatures will plunge to extreme lows. There is no central heat in her one-bedroom unit — or in any of the five units spread throughout the red-brick, three-storey house — any electrical power comes from cords plugged into outlets in the second-floor hallway. Disconnected pipes in her bathroom mean flooding if her water is turned back on.

Deborah Savage was a resident of a property on Keele St. where a small fire forced her and fellow tenants out of their homes.
Deborah Savage was a resident of a property on Keele St. where a small fire forced her and fellow tenants out of their homes.  (Steve Russell / Toronto Star)

Her landlord says he does not want her in there, but, she told the Star, she fears losing her home.

Savage, 47, along with a number of tenants of the Junction house, returned to stay in the building after being displaced by a small fire the first week in January. They’d been staying at a hotel, paid for by an emergency city fund, but a fear of being permanently evicted in a city with a severe shortage of affordable housing has led them to return, effectively occupying their former units without the landlord’s consent.

“We are taking back our place,” said Savage, who was allowed into her apartment by the landlord the day after the fire to pick up necessities. “Homelessness is a big problem in Toronto … we can’t be put out on the street because the landlord decides to renovate,” said Savage. “It’s the middle of winter.”

Landlord David Chun alleges the tenants broke in after refusing to accept that fire damage and issues identified through subsequent inspections mean the house is unsafe.

“There are rules and laws and we are doing everything exactly by the law,” said Chun last week. If there was a way to get them back in he would, he said.

“The police department, the fire department, the fire inspector, the insurance company, the contractor, me the owner, the city and anybody who has been there,” said Chun, when asked who deemed the house unsafe.

But Savage who, like most of her neighbours, lives on a low and fixed income, said some of them would rather live in the home that is now full of holes and partially void of heat and water, than be thrown into Toronto’s rental market, which they say they’ve been priced out of.

Savage pays $650 a month and hydro is included. The average market rent for a one-bedroom unit in a purpose-built rental building in the GTA is about $1,260, according to data published by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Those figures are based largely on occupied apartments and landlords can charge what they want for empty units.

The rest of the tenants are also paying well-below average market rent.

The hole in Savage’s unit was where a strip of drywall had been cut out to expose electrical wiring and wooden studs.

“They took this off after the fire, I guess, to check for damage in my bedroom and that’s it,” said Savage, on Tuesday. One of the tenants told the landlord they were back in, she said, noting she expected he had called the police.

Chun, who signs emails John David Chun, is known to tenants as David Chun.

A fire on Jan. 7 initially displaced residents who have since returned to the house.
A fire on Jan. 7 initially displaced residents who have since returned to the house.  (Toronto Star/Steve Russell)

Savage said they weren’t able to get written proof from the city or landlord that the attic fire meant nobody could come home.

Whether the tenants can stay or will be told to go could be determined at the Landlord and Tenant Board on Tuesday.

The tenants were able to arrange an emergency hearing Friday where their lawyer argued they were entitled to possession and the landlord should restore full power. The landlord’s lawyer argued that the fire and problems found during inspections meant the house was unsafe and he has no choice but to keep them out until the house is fixed.

The board adjudicator said he felt it was best to hold off on a decision until a forthcoming city report could be submitted for everybody’s review.

The fire in the attic of the Keele St. house broke out on Jan. 7. and 10 people were evacuated from five units, including the resident of the attic who has not returned.

Heather Mackay-Lams, 36, who lives in the basement, says she didn’t know anything was wrong until people knocked on her door that morning “I was in my pyjamas, grabbed the cat … we all figured we would be back in five minutes.”

They were sheltered in a TTC bus then sent to a Howard Johnson Inn. The landlord changed the front door and two back locks the next day, they said, and told them renovations and electrical work were needed and they must collect their things.

The city office covering the cost of the hotel said their stay can be extended and no firm date had been set for them to leave.

The tenants got back in, in stages. First-floor resident John Demetriades, whose door is at the back of the house, got a locksmith to let him in more than a week ago. His insulin was inside, he said. Mackay-Lams got in through a window, something she had done a couple times since the fire. Demetriades, 60, was checking the mail on Tuesday and found the front door unlocked. So were the doors of the two upstairs apartments, the tenants told the Star.

So the decision was made to stay in rotating shifts — returning to the inn to shower and eat — to make sure they were not locked out of the Keele St. house again.

The house has not had central heating since Savage initially moved in. Four tenants told the Star they always used space heaters and blankets. Savage said using heaters is one tradeoff for affordable housing.

Savage said Chun has helped them in the past by not raising rent, and during a major ice storm that knocked out the power he provided generators so they could stay in their home.

On Tuesday, the residents say they found space heaters on the second floor and attic and one in the basement that provided a decent amount of heat. When Clinton Reynolds, 37, returned, he also found a stack of cardboard boxes and furniture pulled from the attic piled in his living room. And in his ceiling, there was a gaping hole exposing the upstairs floorboards.

Reynolds, who has a licence to grow marijuana for personal medical use, said his plants have been in storage since the fire and “suffered greatly” because of the cold.

Demetriades said the priority for residents was getting power throughout the house. “We’ll obviously buy water. For me it is going to be a cold night,” he said.

Deborah Savage was a resident of the property on Keele St. when a small fire forced her and fellow tenants out of their homes.
Deborah Savage was a resident of the property on Keele St. when a small fire forced her and fellow tenants out of their homes.  (Toronto Star/Steve Russell)

The police did come by briefly the next day, after being called by the landlord, but left after speaking with Chun’s son and the tenants.

Chun has been ordered to arrange and pay for an inspection by the Electrical Safety Authority, after the provincial body found Chun or an employee “have done electrical wiring” without first arranging for an inspection. He was also ordered to fix any defects by Jan. 23, based on a notice dated Jan. 9. A second notice, mailed on Jan. 31, warned that failure to comply is a provincial offence and a conviction could mean a fine of up to $50,000. Copies were provided by the ESA to the Star, for a fee.

On Friday, an inspector with Toronto Building visited the house and taped an “order to remedy unsafe building” to the front door. Chun must “prohibit the use or occupancy” of the attic apartment, hire an engineer to inspect the building, submit a damage report to the city, make sure urgent repair issues are addressed and obtain permits for all future work, according to that notice.

Prior to that, nobody from the city, including Toronto Fire and Toronto Building, had issued an order to shut the building down, according to Mark Sraga, director, investigation services, municipal licensing and standards.

The power was shut down and doors locked, he said, after tradespeople brought in by the landlord found problems in the house. “It is not that the city has issued any orders directing this, but the building owner knowing the requirements has acted proactively,” he said.

Deputy Fire Chief Jim Jessop told the Star that the property was returned to Chun the day of the fire and “minor deficiencies” were later found in other apartments but no order was issued to evacuate the building.

Chun told the Star he has been a landlord for two decades and provides many people with affordable housing. He owns at least seven properties, some under his name and others, including the Keele St. house are owned by a registered company — where he is listed as sole director.

He said he has terminal brain cancer, that conversations are difficult and stress could devastate his already fragile health. Some of the tenants, he said, have been harassing him. Everything he has done has been above board and legal, he told the Star.

When first contacted, Chun suggested his son could provide a tour of the Keele St. property — to show the extent of the damage — but rescinded in a text message saying the city was in possession of an engineer’s report that proved the property was uninhabitable.

He did not respond to a request to review that report or questions about prior inspections, heating issues and what tenants were told about the work.

“Stop harassing me because you don’t want to get the Star in hot water,” Chun said.

Savage said no tenant should have to go through the stress of losing their home and not being told why and said a central office or hotline could fix the problem.

By Sunday, Savage had run a power cord through a hole in her floor to Demetriades’s apartment so he could run a heater. The water was still off.

Reynolds was so stressed he said that if Chun gave him back first and last months’ rent, covered damages and moving costs he’d leave.

Mackay-Lams, who lives in the basement, found out Sunday morning that her unit had flooded.

“I don’t know if I am coming or going anymore,” she said. “I feel like the lunatics are running the asylum. I have no idea what is going on.”

Emily Mathieu is a Toronto-based reporter covering affordable and precarious housing. Follow her on Twitter: @emathieustar

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Yellowknife house cat faces down lynx through window pane

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Of all the beasts of the northern wild, the lynx — a large forest cat with fur-spiked ears and saucer-wide paws – is perhaps the most elusive.

Even seasoned hunters rarely encounter the feline, according to the Canadian Wildlife Federation.

This week however, Lianne Mantla-Look captured not one — but two — of the wild cats on camera when they appeared on the back deck of her home in Yellowknife’s Kam Lake neighbourhood.

Mantla-Look was sick and in bed when she noticed something out the window.

« There was just this face, » she said.

But it wasn’t until Mantla-Look’s own pet cat Cheese began hissing that she realized what was going on.

« I looked and there was this baby lynx just hanging out. »

Unusual scene

Thinking quickly, Mantla-Look began filming the unusual scene. She later sent the footage to CBC.

Mantla-Look’s video was shot during one of those pristine winter days, when the sun hangs low and radiant in the sky, and the posts and lintels of, say, a Kam Lake back deck, cast long, powder-blue shadows on the freshly-fallen snow.

But on this day, the frosty film that coated Mantla-Look’s upper-level deck was marked with the distinctive prints of cat — a cat much larger than Cheese.

In the video, a young-looking lynx can be seen prowling the deck, poking about as if looking for something.

At about 43 seconds in, the scene is punctuated by an exclamation: « Oh my god, » says Mantla-Look, as she pans the camera, dramatically, to the left.

« I started taking a video and some pictures and then I looked down on the main level of our house, just right down below the deck, and there was another lynx, hanging out down there, » she said.

My cat tried to protect us.– Lianne Mantla-Look

But before video viewers can digest the extraordinary event that is unfolding before them, Cheese reacts.

The first lynx has approached the window and is peering inside and pawing at the frame.

Cheese leaps at the glass.

« My cat tried to protect us, » said Mantla-Look.

Protect them Cheese did. The lynx, defeated, turns around and stalks off.

« After Cheese growled and hissed, the lynx eventually ran off and into the woods, » said Mantla-Look.

« I’ve never seen a lynx this up close and personal before, so it is a pretty incredible experience. »

Many questions remain: why did the two lynx (or lynxes, both plural forms are correct, according to Merriam-Webster) emerge from the wilderness in broad daylight? Why did they venture onto Mantla-Look’s property, specifically? What, on earth, were they looking for?

About lynx-number-one, Mantla-Look has some theories.

« I think it just kind of got curious, » she said. « And probably a little bit hungry. »

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Calgary house fire claims lives of cat and hamster, displaces 4 people – Calgary

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Two animals are dead and four people have been displaced after a fire ripped through a home in southwest Calgary late Thursday afternoon.

The Calgary Fire Department said firefighters were called to a blaze in the 100-block of Oakhampton Place S.W. just before 4:30 p.m.

“The call came to dispatch from the homeowner, who was met with smoke at their front entrance,” the fire department said in a news release. “Upon entry through the front door, fire crews encountered smoke and high heat. Firefighters then initiated an aggressive interior search to locate the seat of the fire.


READ MORE:
Firefighters rescue woman, birds from burning home in southeast Calgary

The fire department said fire attack crews made their way to the basement of the home where they discovered the source of the flames and quickly put out the blaze.

No humans were home at the time of the blaze and no firefighters were injured. However, two animals died as a result of the fire.

“Due to the high heat and smoke, a cat and hamster perished,” the CFD said. “Firefighters performed CPR on the cat, but despite these efforts, were not able to revive the animal.”

Watch below: Some videos from Global News’ coverage of fire-related stories in the Calgary area.


Smoke alarms were activated, the CFD said.


READ MORE:
RV and house catch fire in southeast Calgary

According to fire department officials, the damage to the home means two adults and two children will need to find somewhere else to sleep. They did not say how long they would be displaced.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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TOURISME : Riverside House, bed & breakfast

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En 2017, Jordan Feilders fait l’acquisition d’une maison avec un jardin de 5 000 m en Normandie dans la perspective d’y ouvrir un bed & breakfast où créer des expériences à la carte pour ses hôtes. Un nouveau projet à l’actif de cet Américain originaire de San Francisco installé à Paris, à qui l’on doit le food truck Cantine California lancé en 2012, très vite devenu dealer officiel des meilleurs burgers et tacos californiens de la capitale. Des plats authentiques, faits maison, et préparés avec des produits frais achetés en circuit court. Encensé par la critique culinaire, le New York Times et le Fooding en tête, Jordan ouvre ensuite en 2014 sa cantine fixe dans le 3e arrondissement de Paris. Aujourd’hui désireux de faire partager aux autres plus que des saveurs, le jeune entrepreneur clôt les portes de son restaurant pour se consacrer à l’ouverture de celles de ce lieu atypique à 1 h 30 de Paris. Une adresse à laquelle il entend insuffler un peu du lifestyle californien qui lui est cher, fait de grand air et de nature, et où l’on puisse, selon ses propres termes : « profiter de nouvelles expériences, dans un cadre unique et magique. Se ressourcer et déconnecter. »

Durant la genèse de ce projet, Jordan a pu compter sur le soutien de sa femme Tatiana Dupond, ravie de se mettre au vert avec leurs deux filles, Sofia, 4 ans, et Pénélope, 6 mois, dans cet écrin en bord de Seine. Un projet pensé pour les familles, qui a été inspiré à Jordan par la sienne : « Je voulais créer un lieu où offrir des expériences de liberté à Sofia et Pénélope, et que d’autres puissent vivre ces moments-là ; rassembler la famille autour d’une table à la campagne, pendant que les enfants jouent dehors. Un projet très inspirant, en continuité avec la vie de famille que je construis moi-même…»

Après plus d’un an de travaux sous la houlette de l’architecte Gilles Tombeur, le Riverside House voit enfin le jour. De cette maison du xixe siècle à l’abandon depuis près de trente ans, Jordan a refait à neuf toute l’infrastructure et réapprivoisé le jardin, riche et fertile, où cohabitent tilleul, pommier, poirier, prunier, cerisier, cognassier, ou noyer, mais aussi sauge, lavande, romarin, persil ou estragon, non loin de pieds de framboises et de groseilles. À l’intérieur de la maison, Tatiana et lui ont choisi de conserver une partie des meubles anciens qu’elle contenait lorsde son acquisition, comme des armoires et quelques objets insolites, puis ils ont complété la décoration avec de nouveaux luminaires, des tableaux chinés, et du mobilier en bois brut récupéré du restaurant  de  Jordan. Et le charme opère, la demeure de 1883 semblant avoir été faite pour accueillir la coolitude californienne infusée ça et là par Jordan. Parquet et tomettes anciennes d’origine se mêlent aux nouveaux matériaux, tels que le béton ciré ou le terrazzo italien.
La maison est désormais prête à être mise à disposition comme résidence privée exclusive, disposant de quatre chambres, auxquelles s’ajoutent trois autres dans deux dépendances. L’endroit idéal pour se retrouver en famille ou entre amis, grâce au service de conciergerie à la carte proposé par Jordan : catering par Cantine California, mise à disposition d’un chef privé, d’un coach sportif ou d’un prof de yoga. Riverside House propose, les hôtes disposent. L’idée : leur offrir un rebooting, comprenez redémarrage. Cette nouvelle adresse est définitivement une belle promesse de renaissance pour qui prendra le temps d’y faire une halte. Les expériences proposées, elles, devraient se mettre en place au fil de l’eau, à l’image de la Seine qui coule paisiblement en contrebas de la maison.


riversidehousenormandy.com / @riversidehousenormandy
Riverside House, 32, rue Nationale, 27430 Muids (Eure)
Maison entière (7 chambres doubles) à partir de 1 000 €/nuit. Tarif dégressif à partir de 2 nuits.

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TOURISME : Riverside House, bed & breakfast

[ad_1]

En 2017, Jordan Feilders fait l’acquisition d’une maison avec un jardin de 5 000 m en Normandie dans la perspective d’y ouvrir un bed & breakfast où créer des expériences à la carte pour ses hôtes. Un nouveau projet à l’actif de cet Américain originaire de San Francisco installé à Paris, à qui l’on doit le food truck Cantine California lancé en 2012, très vite devenu dealer officiel des meilleurs burgers et tacos californiens de la capitale. Des plats authentiques, faits maison, et préparés avec des produits frais achetés en circuit court. Encensé par la critique culinaire, le New York Times et le Fooding en tête, Jordan ouvre ensuite en 2014 sa cantine fixe dans le 3e arrondissement de Paris. Aujourd’hui désireux de faire partager aux autres plus que des saveurs, le jeune entrepreneur clôt les portes de son restaurant pour se consacrer à l’ouverture de celles de ce lieu atypique à 1 h 30 de Paris. Une adresse à laquelle il entend insuffler un peu du lifestyle californien qui lui est cher, fait de grand air et de nature, et où l’on puisse, selon ses propres termes : « profiter de nouvelles expériences, dans un cadre unique et magique. Se ressourcer et déconnecter. »

Durant la genèse de ce projet, Jordan a pu compter sur le soutien de sa femme Tatiana Dupond, ravie de se mettre au vert avec leurs deux filles, Sofia, 4 ans, et Pénélope, 6 mois, dans cet écrin en bord de Seine. Un projet pensé pour les familles, qui a été inspiré à Jordan par la sienne : « Je voulais créer un lieu où offrir des expériences de liberté à Sofia et Pénélope, et que d’autres puissent vivre ces moments-là ; rassembler la famille autour d’une table à la campagne, pendant que les enfants jouent dehors. Un projet très inspirant, en continuité avec la vie de famille que je construis moi-même…»

Après plus d’un an de travaux sous la houlette de l’architecte Gilles Tombeur, le Riverside House voit enfin le jour. De cette maison du xixe siècle à l’abandon depuis près de trente ans, Jordan a refait à neuf toute l’infrastructure et réapprivoisé le jardin, riche et fertile, où cohabitent tilleul, pommier, poirier, prunier, cerisier, cognassier, ou noyer, mais aussi sauge, lavande, romarin, persil ou estragon, non loin de pieds de framboises et de groseilles. À l’intérieur de la maison, Tatiana et lui ont choisi de conserver une partie des meubles anciens qu’elle contenait lorsde son acquisition, comme des armoires et quelques objets insolites, puis ils ont complété la décoration avec de nouveaux luminaires, des tableaux chinés, et du mobilier en bois brut récupéré du restaurant  de  Jordan. Et le charme opère, la demeure de 1883 semblant avoir été faite pour accueillir la coolitude californienne infusée ça et là par Jordan. Parquet et tomettes anciennes d’origine se mêlent aux nouveaux matériaux, tels que le béton ciré ou le terrazzo italien.
La maison est désormais prête à être mise à disposition comme résidence privée exclusive, disposant de quatre chambres, auxquelles s’ajoutent trois autres dans deux dépendances. L’endroit idéal pour se retrouver en famille ou entre amis, grâce au service de conciergerie à la carte proposé par Jordan : catering par Cantine California, mise à disposition d’un chef privé, d’un coach sportif ou d’un prof de yoga. Riverside House propose, les hôtes disposent. L’idée : leur offrir un rebooting, comprenez redémarrage. Cette nouvelle adresse est définitivement une belle promesse de renaissance pour qui prendra le temps d’y faire une halte. Les expériences proposées, elles, devraient se mettre en place au fil de l’eau, à l’image de la Seine qui coule paisiblement en contrebas de la maison.


riversidehousenormandy.com / @riversidehousenormandy
Riverside House, 32, rue Nationale, 27430 Muids (Eure)
Maison entière (7 chambres doubles) à partir de 1 000 €/nuit. Tarif dégressif à partir de 2 nuits.

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Average Canadian house cost $472K in December, down 4.9% in 2018

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The average Canadian home sold in December cost $472,000, a figure that declined by almost five per cent in 2018.

The Canadian Real Estate Association also said Tuesday that the number of homes sold was down, too, to the lowest annual pace since 2012.

December is not typically a busy year for home sales, but this year’s look even worse when compared to the same month in 2017, because at the time, new rules for stress testing mortgages were about to be implemented, and buyers were rushing to buy before they came into force in January 2018.

Sales were down by 19 per cent in December compared to the same month a year earlier.

« Trends were pushed higher in December 2017 by homebuyers rushing to purchase before the new federal mortgage stress test took effect at the beginning of 2018, » CREA president  Barb Sukkau said. « Since then, the stress test has weighed on sales to varying degrees in all Canadian housing markets and it will continue to do so this year. »

Toronto-Dominion Bank economist Rishi Sondhi said the numbers show the housing market has clearly « lost some steam » in the second half of last year.

« The broad-based nature of the decline suggests that rising interest rates and a tighter lending environment are impacting markets across the country, » he said. For 2019, he projects « the level of sales will remain relatively low compared to recent years. »

Real estate prices in Toronto and Vancouver are consistently and significantly higher than they are just about anywhere else in Canada, so those two cities skew the national average higher. Stripping the two out of the equation, the average Canadian home was worth just over $375,000 last month.

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