Several Laval streets covered in snow and ice – Montreal

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It’s easier to get around André-Du Bouchet Street with a pair of ice skates than a pair of boots these days,.

Part of the street in Laval is covered in ice that is as smooth, if not smoother, than some public rinks.

“For someone who doesn’t normally skate, I’m getting very good,” joked Sidney Tayebi to Global News.

READ MORE: LaSalle residents angry and confused by lack of snow removal

The Laval resident says she’s never seen her street in such bad condition in the seven years she’s been living on André-Du Bouchet Street.

“If they would have kept up with the snow cleaning, then we wouldn’t have this problem today,” she said.

While the street is a sheet of ice, the sidewalk is covered in snow several feet high.

“I feel terrible for the older people around here, we can’t walk. We have to drive in our own neighbourhood. We can’t even walk,” Andy Golemme, another resident on the same street said.

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Driving around Laval, Global News saw several streets — both secondary roads and busy primary ones — that hadn’t been cleared of ice and snow.

“Somebody needs to take responsibility. It’s not normal this. Everybody is complaining. I’m not the only one,” George Mitskas said.

The resident lives on Ethier Street — another road that is covered in ice and snow.

READ MORE: Slushy mess greets Montreal commuters after onslaught of freezing rain, snow

Both sidewalks are completely covered and unusable.

The sidewalk on Notre-Dame Boulevard is a sheet of ice. Global News saw a pedestrian avoiding it by walking on the busy street instead.

“It is our first winter of this kind. Of this magnitude,” Ray Khalil, Laval’s executive committee member responsible for public works, told Global News.

Khalil admits not all the roads are getting cleared of ice and snow as quickly as possible.

But he insists it’s not without effort.

READ MORE: Roofs collapse across Quebec after province struck by heavy snow, rain

The city councillor says 95 per cent of the annual road salt has already been used and more has been ordered.

He says crews have also been working overtime to try and keep up with the snow and ice removal.

But Khalil insists a lot of the problems are due to the fluctuating weather conditions this winter.

“We will put the salt, we will put the abrasives then the temperature rises up again, everything melts a little bit. And then drops down. Sometimes we’ve seen within 48 hours a 22 degree difference right? So it will freeze all over again and we got to start the process again,” he said.

Khalil says a new strategy is being worked on to improve snow and ice removal.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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New insect found in B.C. caves could be a survivor from Ice Age

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A newly discovered cave-dwelling species of insect found in British Columbia could be a survivor from the last ice age, scientists say.

Haplocampa wagnelli, the arthropod found in a limestone cave near Port Alberni on Vancouver Island, is about three to four millimetres long, with six legs, no eyes and a whitish, almost transparent colour.

Alberto Sendra, lead author of a study published in the journal Subterranean Biology last week, said the little bug’s existence opens up possibilities of how species survive in different climates and conditions.

« This is a very intriguing species because it looks like it lived underground in caves — for more or less a long time, » Sendra said in an interview.

« This means they can survive in the glacial period. And this is very remarkable because there are no examples of species that live in subterranean areas so up north. »

Sendra, a professor of animal biology at the University of Alcala in Madrid, said there is a possibility the insect migrated north from the United States and settled in the caves in Vancouver.

He said he could not say how old the insect is — just that it is primitive, and its discovery raises a number of questions.

« How can they survive there? It opens up the possibility in the future to search for species in other places where nobody looks for them, » he said.

« We always look in warmer climates in the south and this species suggests we need to look for this more in the Northern Hemisphere. »

Named after B.C. caver

The insect’s name pays tribute to caver and study co-author Craig Wagnell, who has spent years exploring caves on Vancouver Island.

A group from the Central Island Caving Club, including Wagnell, first recorded the critter in 2017, and Sendra said he spent the last year studying it.

Unlike most cave-adapted species that are elongated and slender, this insect has only slightly elongated antennae and legs and a thicker body, according to a news release announcing the study.

It also shows a close relationship with species found in Japan and Siberia, which is evidence for dispersal events where populations would cross over the land bridge that used to connect America and Asia, the release stated.

The study said Vancouver Island has more mapped and explored caves than the rest of Canada combined, and many contain unique features, including streams and rivers running through them most of the year.

The caves help the streams maintain constant water temperatures and quality year round, which helps support a variety of fish and wildlife, the study said, noting little has been done to protect the caves from logging, mining and recreational practices.

Some of the caves have been misused and more needs to be done to protect them and the unique wildlife they support, researchers said.

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‘Historic Hockey Series’: History on ice in Kingston – Kingston

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There was a time when the “hockey net” was literally wooden posts frozen in the ice and referees used bells to stop play.

The annual “Historic Hockey Series” was the premier event at Feb Fest Saturday, at Market Square in Kingston.

“Let the 51st annual series begin,” yells town crier Chris Whyman, ringing his bell.

It is an annual tradition, a re-enactment of the first organized games on the Kingston harbour in the 1800s.

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“The significance is we are trying to pay tribute to the early origins of the game,” says Mark Potter, president of the Original Hockey Hall of Fame.

The first game was between Queen’s University and the Royal Military College in 1886.


READ MORE:
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Today at Market Square, players obey the rules of the game from 133 years ago.

“Probably the biggest change from then to now is the fact that in the 1800s there was no forward passing. So it is quite much like rugby. It’s lateral passing. Passing from behind”, says Potter.

“You cannot move the puck up the ice and pass to a teammate. So it makes the game completely different. As a result, the games are quite low scoring.”

The re-enactment is a brief glimpse into how hockey got started. And how the frozen game has evolved: a history lesson on ice.

“We are really trying to show, especially to younger people today,  where the game began. What a contrast,” says Potter.

The original puck used on March 10, 1886, was square, made from a cut-down lacrosse ball. Pucks back then were often made of wood or rubber.

Long-time hockey fans had a chance to see and meet Maple Leafs legend Bobby Baun, who was there to sign autographs.

Al Smith was there adding another signature to his very dingy Maple Leafs jersey. He has collected over 120 other signatures over the years from NHL players.

“I can’t wash it. One guy asked last week ‘What do you do, change the oil with it?” Smith says laughing.


READ MORE:
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Also, a part of the event was recognizing the contribution women have made to the game.

In particular the Red Barons, the ground-breaking women’s hockey team formed in 1969. They won numerous tournaments and championships in Ontario and Quebec in the 1970s.

“The main message could be: if Kingston was not the birthplace of hockey, the game evolved and grew up here,” says Potter, “and that is the primary thing that we are trying to show people.”

And finally, a fun fact: the first and only goal scored in the 1886 game was scored by Queen’s University’s Lennox Irving.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Resilient insect newly discovered in B.C. cave may be survivor from Ice Age

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A newly discovered cave-dwelling species of insect found in British Columbia could be a survivor from the last ice age, scientists say.


READ MORE:
The bugs we need — bees, ladybugs, butterflies — appear to be dying off, scientists say

Haplocampa wagnelli, the arthropod found in a limestone cave near Port Alberni on Vancouver Island, is about three to four millimetres long, with six legs, no eyes, and a whitish, almost transparent colour.

Alberto Sendra, lead author of a study published in the journal Subterranean Biology on Tuesday, said the little bug’s existence opens up possibilities of how species survive in different climates and conditions.

“This is a very intriguing species because it looks like it lived underground in caves – for more or less a long time,” Sendra said in an interview.

WATCH: Monarch butterfly count increases 144 per cent






“This means they can survive in the glacial period. And this is very remarkable because there are no examples of species that live in subterranean areas so up north.”

Sendra, a professor of animal biology at the University of Alcala in Madrid, said there is a possibility the insect migrated north from the United States and settled in the caves in Vancouver.

He said he could not say how old the insect is – just that it is primitive, and its discovery raises a number of questions.

Global News

Help us improve GlobalNews.ca

“How can they survive there? It opens up the possibility in the future to search for species in other places where nobody looks for them,” he said.


READ MORE:
Cockroach milk? Insect dairy alternatives could be the next superfood trend

“We always look in warmer climates in the south and this species suggests we need to look for this more in the Northern Hemisphere.”

The insect’s name pays tribute to caver and study co-author Craig Wagnell, who has spent years exploring caves on Vancouver Island.

A group from the Central Island Caving Club, including Wagnell, first recorded the critter in 2017, and Sendra said he spent the last year studying it.

Unlike most cave-adapted species that are elongated and slender, this insect has only slightly elongated antennae and legs and a thicker body, according to a news release announcing the study.

WATCH: Bedbug battle – study suggests insects developed thicker skin to beat insecticides






It also shows a close relationship with species found in Japan and Siberia, which is evidence for dispersal events where populations would cross over the land bridge that used to connect America and Asia, the release stated.

The study said Vancouver Island has more mapped and explored caves than the rest of Canada combined, and many contain unique features, including streams and rivers running through them most of the year.

The caves help the streams maintain constant water temperatures and quality year-round, which helps support a variety of fish and wildlife, the study said, noting little has been done to protect the caves from logging, mining and recreational practices.

Some of the caves have been misused and more needs to be done to protect them and the unique wildlife they support, researchers said.

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No more shinny? Thousands of lakes are losing their winter ice, study says

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Researchers suggest that by the late 21st century, 35,000 freshwater lakes — across three continents and 50 countries — could see permanent ice loss from warming winters if the global climate warms beyond the two-degree target set by the Paris Agreement.

Ice-free lakes can:

  • Cut access to remote communities.
  • Put an end to outdoor sports like ice fishing and hockey.
  • Disrupt feeding and spawning for fish and other aquatic species.

Since Canada has almost 14 per cent of the world’s freshwater lakes, the country could be particularly hard hit by the warming trend.

More than 40 per cent of the lakes with reduced ice levels in the late 21st century will be in Canada, estimates the lead author of the study, York University biology professor Sapna Sharma.

The study outlines how a small temperature increase can dramatically change a community’s use of lakes. It’s estimated that a 1 C annual increase in air temperature could cause millions of people worldwide to lose access to frozen lakes. That will affect remote communities that rely on ice roads across lakes as main avenues for transporting supplies.

Increased warming on lakes will also impact populations of marine life such as fish, said Lewis Molot, an expert in lake ecology at York University, as the necessary food sources to sustain current populations may not be available.

To draw their conclusions, researchers from Canada, the U.S. Germany, Sweden and the U.K. examined 50 years worth of lake-ice records from around the world.

The study was published last month in the journal Nature Climate Change, assessing 514 lakes for ice loss during winters. Twenty eight of these freshwater lakes, including Lake Superior, stood out to researchers, as their historical data points to a growing number of winters without the presence of ice since the 1970s.  

John Magnuson, one of the study’s researchers, shot this photo of Lake Mendota in Wisconsin in January 2007. Reduced lake-ice could economically damage rural communities who depend on winter ice roads to transport supplies. (John Magnuson/University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Lake Superior’s vulnerability to ice-free winters is due to a combination of its depth and warmer air temperatures, prolonging or preventing the lake’s cooling process, researchers said.

« We discovered that Lake Superior is the second fastest warming lake in the world of all the lakes that we studied. We were able to link its high summer temperatures to its reduced ice coverage in the winter, » Sharma said.

previous study done by Sharma’s team in 2015, notes that over a 25 year span, Superior’s summer water surface temperatures rose by more than twice the rate of oceans, averaging about 0.34 C per decade.

« What worries me is the rapidity at which we may experience the dramatic change, » Sharma said. « I’m not sure if we are prepared for a near future without lake ice: culturally, socio-economically but also ecologically. » 

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‘Little Ice Age’ caused by death of 55-million Indigenous people after colonization: study – National

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The elimination of nearly 55 million, or 90 per cent, of Indigenous North Americans during European colonization led to global climate change and the “Little Ice Age” of the 17th century, a recent study finds.

Researchers at University College London found that the Great Dying — the massive loss of life that followed Christopher Columbus’ 1492 conquest of the Americas through genocide and the spread of disease — left roughly 56-million hectares of land abandoned.

The study will be published in the March edition of Quaternary Science Reviews but is already available online.

“This population practised a substantial amount of agriculture,” researcher Alexander Koch told Global News.


READ MORE:
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The mass vacancy resulted in a sudden “terrestrial carbon uptake” when the land was reclaimed by nature.

Colonization of the Americas at the end of the 15th century killed so many people, it disturbed Earth’s climate, according to a new study by University College London.

According to the study, a spike in plant life was responsible for up to 67 per cent of a significant drop in carbon dioxide levels between 1520 and 1610. Carbon had been transferred from the atmosphere to the land surface through photosynthesis.

Previously cored Antarctic ice samples were investigated. Researchers observed that 7.4 petagrams — or 7-billion metric tonnes — of carbon had suddenly disappeared at that point in time.


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Carbon absorption was greater in wet, tropical environments but still occurred in the drier, coniferous and deciduous forests of the U.S. and Canada.

“These changes show that the Great Dying of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas is necessary for a parsimonious explanation of the anomalous decrease in atmospheric CO2 at that time and the resulting decline in global surface air temperatures,” the study said.

An undated painting shows Christopher Columbus arriving at one of the Caribbean islands on his voyage of discovery from the Naval Museum in Madrid, seen on May 19, 2006.

AFP/Getty Images

The Little Ice Age was a time period that saw winters in North America and Europe average approximately two degrees colder than the current era. Its coldest period is largely agreed by scientists to be between 1600 and 1800.

A difference of two degrees may not seem like much but, in fact, does make quite a difference to daily life.


READ MORE:
New law on Indigenous languages will aim to help them ‘survive and thrive’

“A 1-2 degree Celsius temperature drop would have a significant effect on winter weather around North America,” said Anthony Farnell, chief meteorologist at Global News. “Snow would arrive earlier in the fall and stick around longer in the spring. Borderline storms that now fall as rain or freezing rain would be more likely snow if it was just a couple degrees colder.”

Farnell went on to explain how an increase in snow compounded the situation in the 1600s.

“When there is more snow on the ground, the albedo of the earth’s surface increases which means more of the sun’s warming rays are reflected back into space. This then leads to even colder temperatures and more snow which is how a series of cold winters can snowball into a ‘little ice age.’”

The nearly 200-year cold stretch began to decline soon after the first Industrial Revolution began in the United Kingdom in 1760.

WATCH: How researchers determined 55 million killed after colonization






Global News questioned Koch over his team’s data — particularly the population figures. He explained they used a vast amount of data, previous studies and sources to draw their conclusion.

“[The numbers are] based on archaeological evidence, historical documentation and something like house counts,” Koch explained. “For later periods, we didn’t need to do that. We looked into taxation records and census data that was established by the colonizers.”

Those records became more and more robust over time, according to Koch.


READ MORE:
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Dr. Pamela Palmater is an outspoken Mi’kmaw citizen and faculty member at Ryerson University. She told Global News the population figures aren’t just important — they could change how Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission moves forward.

This report substantiates what the chair of the TRC said that it wasn’t just cultural genocide that Canada committed, it was also physical and biological,” explained Palmater. “This kind of scientific hard data shows just how extensive the genocide was and that means something different for Truth and Reconciliation.

The well-known activist added that she hopes the new scientific data will quiet some of the skeptics.

WATCH BELOW: Activist: ‘Someone’s got to account for this’ after study claims colonization sparked climate change






“One of the biggest struggles in our resistance, in our advocacy and even trying to get someone to talk about reconciliation is denial,” Palmater said. “It’s always a denial from the colonial, or settler, governments about what they did, limiting the harms and denying what the true extent and impact is.”

That impact, according to the study, may have been greater than previously thought.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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School buses cancelled as ice pellets, freezing rain hits the GTA

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Winter is making a comeback.

Environment Canada has issued a winter weather travel advisory for Toronto and many of the surrounding areas. Ice pellets and freezing rain have begun in the GTA and surrounding areas.

Environment Canada is predicting an icy commute home to and from work Wednesday.
Environment Canada is predicting an icy commute home to and from work Wednesday.  (Andrew Francis Wallace / Toronto Star)

The travel advisory warns of ice pellets beginning in the morning, mixing with freezing rain at about midday. Toronto could see around 2 to 4 cm of ice pellets, the weather agency said.

As a result, buses were cancelled to schools in the Toronto District, Toronto Catholic District, York Region District, York Catholic District, Durham District and Durham Catholic District school boards Wednesday morning. Schools remain open.

All schools, offices and buses in the Peel District, Hamilton-Wentworth District, Waterloo Region District, Dufferin-Peel Catholic District, District school board of Niagara and Halton Catholic District school boards have been cancelled.

The University of Waterloo and Brock University cancelled their campus classes Wednesday.

The TTC is advising commuters to allow for extra travel time and prepare to seek alternative routes. Streetcars have been replaced with buses on the 506 Carlton and 512 St. Clair routes.

By 7:45 a.m. Wednesday, Pearson airport had cancelled almost 20 per cent of their departure flights and almost 20 per cent of arriving flights.

Icy roads are expected for the evening commute.

“We’re looking at a prolonged period of freezing rain, especially on bare roads it could mean formation of black ice. So, it could be complicated driving conditions for the return home,” Environment Canada meteorologist Marie-Ève Giguère said.

“The key element is that it will last several hours,” she said.

Wednesday’s daytime high will be -3 C, but with wind chill it will feel like -10 C.

The travel advisory is in effect for Caledon, Mississauga, Brampton, Kingston, Peterborough, York and Durham Regions.

“We’re looking at dangerous driving all across, from southwestern Ontario to the GTA, Kitchener, Waterloo, Oshawa,” Giguère said.

Giguère said that temperatures are supposed to dramatically warm up Thursday, seeing a high of 5 or 6 C.

However, Giguère said the changing weather patterns will continue.

“Thursday it will all melt, just in time for Friday when we go quite abruptly back to cold temperatures,” she said.

OPP Sgt. Kerry Schmidt told reporters early Wednesday morning that “it looks like winter has arrived again,” citing a lot of ice pellets on the ground. Ramps on the highway are slippery, and the potential for crashes are “very real,” he said.

Drivers are likely going to be going a lot faster than they should and that is going to lead to a lot of problems, said Schmidt.

Friday’s daytime high in the city is expected to be -3 C and the low -11 C.

with files from Lisa Queen at YorkRegion.com and Emerald Bensadoun.

Claire Floody is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @claire_floody

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Adults learn to ice skate at Kingston’s Market Square – Kingston

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The skating rink at Market Square in Kingston was blocked off Sunday morning for adults who were learning to skate.

Sarah Wurtele was among those lacing up her skates as she prepared herself to step on the ice after 22 years.

“I stopped skating when I was 10, and this is my first time skating since then,” Wurtele told Global News.

When she first got on the ice, “it was dread,” Wurtele said. “I thought I was going to fall but I haven’t fallen yet.”

This is a feeling many adults shared at the second annual adult skating class, which was part of Kingston’s Feb Fest.


READ MORE:
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“I think it’s great that they have it for adults because a lot of programs are geared towards kids, but there’s not that many for adults, and we feel embarrassed,” said Wurtele. “We feel self-conscious trying to learn how to skate, especially around young kids.”

Veteran skating instructor Lynn Grivich was teaching adults to skate at the event.

“We’re getting a great response,” Grivich said. “There’s a lot of newcomers to Kingston that have perhaps never skated before.”

The event brought about 25 adults to Market Square, half of whom were, like Wurtele, starting from scratch.

Grivich says she finds “a lot of satisfaction seeing just how nervous and stiff they are when they initially come on to the ice and then gradually start relaxing.”


READ MORE:
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Global News asked Grivich to provide some pointers for new skaters.

She says the most common mistake people make is that they push the blade forward instead of pushing from the side.

“You’re pushing and bending from side to side,” said Grivich.

She also adds that the most important tip of all is to relax, something that sounds simple but is usually the hardest for those new to the ice.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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RCMP teams up with Indigenous group to bring ice rink to remote northern Alberta community

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The Dene Tha’ First Nation is located in a remote part of northern Alberta but thanks to a partnership with the RCMP and others, Indigenous children from that community can now enjoy an ice rink, an amenity children in other parts of Canada enjoy throughout the cold winter months.

The RCMP said young people in the Chateh, Alta., area tied up their skates to use their brand new public rink on Monday, thanks to a partnership between the Mounties and the Dene Tha’ First Nation Recreation and Cultural Society.

“A first of its kind in the community, the rink will facilitate sports year round thanks to contributions from the Rink of Dreams Society, Sports Central, RCMP Foundation, Tolko Industries and funding from Jordan’s Principle,” police said in a news release.

Before this rink opened to the public, the RCMP said the nearest recreation centre that could be accessed by the 300 young people in the Chateh area was located in Rainbow Lake, about 45 minutes away.

READ MORE: ‘It’s the Canadian thing to do’: One-of-a-kind skating rink opens near Onanole

Watch below: Some videos from Global News’ coverage of rinks.


“Detachment Commander Sgt. Gord Hughes and Dene Tha’ Council members recognized a need for a space in their community where local youth could enjoy safe physical activity, relieve stress, engage with other members of the community and build an open and positive relationship with the RCMP,” police said.

Hughes and the Dene Tha’ First Nation Recreation and Cultural Society were provided with more than $150,000 in funding through Jordan’s Principle grants.

“Jordan’s Principle is a commitment to First Nations children to ensure they get the products, services and support they need, when they need them,” the RCMP said.

READ MORE: Alberta government signs Jordan’s Principle agreement with feds, First Nations group

While the rink’s construction was completed in November, a “hockey-tape cutting ceremony” took place on Monday morning, which was followed by a hockey game.

“Ensuring the wellbeing of a community and of its youth is fundamental to a healthy community,” Hughes said. “By building the Heek’iicho Mieh (Bison Pond), we want to facilitate wellness across the spectrum — physical, mental, emotional and social.

“We want this space to be a rink, an arena and a sanctuary for Chateh youth.”

READ MORE: Fred Sasakamoose and Ted Nolan concerned about future of aboriginal hockey

Chateh is located about 850 kilometres north of Edmonton.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Time running out for Okanagan ice wine producers

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A blanket of fog hovers over Penticton on Saturday.

Temperature: One degree. Balmy for late January, but there are some who wish it gets colder so local wineries can make ice wine.

In order to make it, the grapes have be picked at no less than minus-8 degrees Celsius.

Someone who’s watching the thermometre is Burke Ganton at Red Rooster winery.

“Fog is a little bit unusual for us right now, but certainly we can get this,” said Ganton. “I recall in past years we pulled ice wine in November.

“So we’ve done it in November, we’ve done it in January and we’ve done it other months, too. So it is very much a waiting game.”

WATCH BELOW: (Aired Jan. 20, 2019) Know where your wine comes from






Dave Carson is the winemaker for Jackson Triggs in Oliver. He’s been in the industry since the early 80s and says this mild winter brings back memories.

“I do remember in 2002 when I was making ice wine for Sumac Ridge when we actually harvested it (ice wine) in March, amazingly enough. But this is very unusual. We don’t like to see this situation for the industry,” Carson said.

The ice wine business in Canada is a big industry. Canada’s wineries produce more than two million bottles of the liquid gold per year worth more than $70 million.

Jackson Triggs got lucky this season, pulling most of its ice wine harvest in early December during a brief cold snap. But Carson says the cut-off date for the other Okanagan wineries is quickly approaching.

“When we talk about cut off points, in my mind, I start thinking around early to mid-February. If you’re not seeing anything happening, the chance of it happening are very small,” Carson said.

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