Les aventuriers de Kids on the Moon

[ad_1]

Créer des pièces confortables, vivantes et pointues, inspirées de l’imaginaire créatif des enfants : voici le mantra de Kids on the Moon. Pour la collection printemps-été 2019, la marque polonaise dévoile des silhouettes looses, aérées, empreintes de vibes estivales et de souvenirs d’enfance. Avec des imprimés minimalistes, des couleurs douces, du lin et coton pur.

Chaque saison, Kids on the Moon conte des histoires à travers des modèles drôles et conforts pour tous les jours. Cette saison, la collection”Playground” se veut être le compagnon des folles escapades et des rêves en grand. Ambiance sortie de plage et cheveux salés. Des robes et jupes légèrement  tie & dye, des tee-shirts et pulls loose à messages pour laisser place à l’imagination enfantine et leur créativité débordante.

Un collection pensée pour les petits curieux, les rêveurs et avides de nouvelles aventures. Avec comme terrain de jeu, le monde entier.


kidsonthemoon.com

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Ford government autism program overhaul met with outrage by some parents who fear kids will lose out

[ad_1]

Parents of children with autism will be given the power to choose what services they want — but there will be a total family budget of $140,000 and high-earners will no longer be eligible.

In an announcement Wednesday in Toronto, Lisa MacLeod, the minister of children, community and social services, also said the government is doubling funding for diagnostic hubs and planning to clear the 23,000-child wait-list within the next 18 months.

Waiting for a diagnosis — which currently can take more than two years — can “throw a family into crisis,” said MacLeod.

“This is the best approach and the most fair approach to make sure every single child” is well-served,” she added.

The amount of funding will depend on the length of time a child will be in the program, and support will be targeted to lower- and middle-income families. Families with annual incomes above $250,000 will no longer be eligible for funding, MacLeod said.

“It ignores the fact that there are some kids on the severe end of the spectrum requiring tons of support and time and those on the mild end” who don’t, said Kirby-McIntosh.

“I’m diabetic and so is my husband, but it doesn’t make sense to give us the same amount of insulin.”

She said she’s “terrified” about means testing. Just because families are making more than $250,000 “doesn’t mean they have $80,000 lying around in the couch cushions.”

She said she was “devastated” by the direction the government is headed.

In her announcement, MacLeod said the government is doubling funding for five diagnostic hubs to $5.5 million a year for the next two years to address the diagnosis waiting list of 2,400 children, who currently wait on average for 31 weeks.

“Today, almost three out of every four children who require autism supports continue to be stranded on wait-lists, due to the cynicism and incompetence of the previous government,” MacLeod told reporters at Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, one of diagnostic hubs.

“The parents of these children have told me they are feeling abandoned. We cannot, in good conscience, continue treating these parents and children like lower-class citizens, so we are introducing reforms to provide them with the fairness and equality they deserve.”

Parents of children with autism launched protests against the previous Liberal government in the spring of 2016 when it announced that kids over age 5 would be cut off from funding for intensive therapy.

The Liberals ultimately backed down and installed a new minister — Michael Coteau — to roll out a new program, which proved to be much more popular with parents.

Coteau announced more funding, a quicker start date, no age cut-offs, and a direct funding option to allow parents to either receive funding to pay for private therapy or use government-funded services.

Wednesday’s changes announced by the Progressive Conservative government include establishing a new agency to help families register for the program, assess their funding eligibility, distribute the money and help them choose which services to purchase.

Clinical supervisors will have to meet program qualifications by April 1, 2021 and the government will be publishing a list of verified service providers.

With files from The Canadian Press

Kristin Rushowy is a Toronto-based reporter covering Ontario politics. Follow her on Twitter: @krushowy

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Three kids hurt after Toronto daycare ceiling falls on them

[ad_1]

Three young children are hurt after part of a daycare ceiling fell on them, Toronto police say.

Police received a call for an industrial accident in the area of Dundas St. W. and Boustead Ave. near High Park, just before 1 p.m. Monday. The children, two girls and one boy, had minor injuries and were treated by paramedics at the scene, police said.

Police spokesperson Katrina Arrogante said the parents have been notified and that all of the children are now out of the building.

The building inspector is at the scene, Arrogante said, and Toronto Fire Services is “concerned about (the) structure of the building.”

Ilya Bañares is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @ilyaoverseas

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

2 kids taken to hospital after eating cannabis chocolate bar, Brandon police say

[ad_1]

Brandon police are warning parents to make sure cannabis products are kept out of sight after two young children got their hands on a cannabis-infused chocolate bar. 

Police said the children, aged five and two, had to be taken to hospital for treatment on Saturday.

« Just looking at it, you can see why a child would grab it and think it’s just a piece of chocolate, » Brandon police Sgt. Dallas Lockhart told CBC News on Saturday. 

Lockhart said the service wanted to use it as an example for parents on why it’s important to keep such products away from children. 

« This does look like an actual chocolate bar, » he said. « It’s not surprising that children, especially young children, would see it and think that it’s a treat. » 

Purchasing or selling edible cannabis products is still illegal in Canada, but making them at home is allowed under the current legislation. 

Lockhart said the incident is under investigation and wouldn’t say whether anyone would face charges. 

« We’re not pointing a finger at one particular person, » he said. « This was an unfortunate incident. We wanted to take this opportunity, with a live example, to say that these are products that are not meant for children. »

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Calgary Uber driver warns against sending kids solo in rideshare service

[ad_1]

For one Uber driver, there is little he hasn’t seen. From being sexually harassed to being assaulted and yelled at, the Calgary driver says there are many challenges of the job.

But it wasn’t the attacks that were of concern for him this week. Instead, it was a series of events concerning children that prompted him to speak out.

Global News has agreed not to identify the Uber driver out of concern of negative repercussions to his job.

The driver said in three instances on Monday, when he arrived at a pick-up location, no adult was around. Instead, each of the three times a child tried to get into his vehicle.

“I had received three requests for minors, unbeknownst to me,” he said. “I didn’t realize they were minors until I approached their houses and they stepped out.”


READ MORE:
Toronto ride-sharing drivers say car seats becoming contentious issue with passengers

The children were between seven and 10 years old, according to the driver.

He canceled all three rides but the experiences left him shaking his head. He is advising parents to call a cab instead, as taxi companies have proper protocols in place to deal with minors.

“Not [all Uber drivers have] good intentions as I do,” he said.

But the City of Calgary refutes that safety issue.

Chief livery inspector Abdul Rafih said all drivers, taxi or Uber, go through the same strict vetting process which includes a police background check and vulnerable sector check — which investigates whether someone has been convicted of a sexual offence and was pardoned.

He said the city’s safety checklist and thorough background checks speak to the trust parents have in the taxi and ridesharing system.

“We check all drivers to ensure all passengers are safe in that mode of transportation,” Rafih said. “They understand, namely parents, that they can at times allow their child to enter a mode of transportation and safely arrive at their destination.”

For its part, Uber said its policy explicitly prohibits drivers from picking up children under the age of 18. People who use the app are also not allowed to let minors ride unattended.

“Every trip is GPS tracked and no trip is anonymous, safety doesn’t end with background checks,” Uber spokesperson Kayla Whaling said. “We have a two-way feedback system with a support team who is dedicated 24/7 to monitor the feedback of trips.”


READ MORE:
Skip the bag lunch: Students opt for delivery over food from home and cafeterias

Drivers who are unsure of a rider’s age can also ask them to provide identification or a driver’s licence for confirmation, according to Uber.

The Calgary Uber driver is also asking parents to put the onus on themselves and warned them against being too trusting.

“Parents are relying too much on Uber to move their children around from location to location. Let’s be diligent as adults and take care of our children,” he said.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Alison Cayne Handles a Cooking School, a Café, a Sauce Business, and Five Kids | Healthyish

[ad_1]

In Entrepreneurs Run the World, we get advice and insight from game-changing entrepreneurs with big ideas. This week we talked to Alison Cayne, manager of Haven’s Kitchen and creator of In The Sauce, a podcast on Heritage Radio Network.

Today I spent two hours painting while listening to Spotify’s All Out ‘10s playlist. I did an online dance class in my living room and rewarded myself with hummus, butter, and Vegemite on toast (oh, get over it). I paid some bills and sent an invoice because freelance life. And then, finally, I sat on my floor and wrote this piece.

In comparison, on any normal day you’ll find Alison Cayne simultaneously managing Haven’s Kitchen—a cooking school, event space, and cafe in a lofty, three story building in Manhattan—while also tending to the needs of her five (!!) children. She might spend some time peddling her brand new range of fresh-made, Haven’s-branded sauces, or organizing an interview at Heritage Radio Network for her podcast In The Sauce. (It’s a show designed to debunk nerdy food-industry challenges in much the same way Haven’s demystifies dinner.)

If I’m human, Alison Cayne is Superwoman.

The Haven’s mission, Cayne says, is to tackle some of the core issues with big food—that she learned about while getting her masters in food studies from NYU—in a way that isn’t overly intellectualized. “You know, like farm subsidies, the fact that about a quarter of our crops are being grown for fuel rather than food, GMOs, and food deserts,” she says.

Exasperated with the lack of general knowledge around these issues, Cayne decided to open a recreational cooking school. “I figured that if the average consumer can learn to cook from home, and use their kitchens to shift the system a little bit, then they don’t need to learn all of this stuff—they’ll just be making a change every time they make a meal.”

Haven’s Kitchen is a unique sanctuary where you can witness biodiversity practices firsthand (using produce sourced from the Union Square Greenmarket), while learning to cook better at home. But, rest assured, Cayne is always wary of things getting too virtuous. “I love cheese. I really like alcohol. I put gluten in things,” she says.

Here, Cayne explains what it’s like to build a physical space from the ground up, how we can put the joy back in cooking, and why she doesn’t believe in competition.

What was your original plan for starting Haven’s Kitchen?

I’d find a small space in a building, and take people on farmers’ market tours in the mornings. We’d then go back to the kitchen and we’d make a meal. I’d send them out, lock up, and go home. And then I came upon this three-story carriage house, and my face morphed into that emoji with the heart eyes.

What did you envision when you first saw it?

I immediately imagined this communal beehive, where all things food systems, justice, and love came together. A place where all the movements happening in the food world could have a physical space to exist. While I was picturing it, everyone and their mother was like, « Very bad idea. Don’t do that. Retail sucks. It’s a nightmare. »

But you did it anyway?

It was 2010-ish, and I had a nest egg, and it seemed to me no bigger of a bet doing this than trusting someone else with it. I met with the landlord. He was like, « All right, lady. I’m not going to put in any money, but I’ll give you a year free rent if you want to go and build it out and get all of the permits. »

There wasn’t a kitchen here already?

There was nothing. Everything you see here, I built. Meanwhile, I also built out a forecast of sales based on fully booking three cooking classes a day, seven days a week. Which is hilarious. And I didn’t count on my expenses being what they were. But I also didn’t count on the events business or our cafe doing so well—because I had no idea.

With events, classes, and the café all at once, your model seems complex. Can you simplify why you did it all?

I think the cooking classes are the heart. The café is like the big arms that are open to everybody. And the events are like the legs that makes the thing run.

And now you retail your own line of Haven’s Kitchen ready-made sauces. Can you elaborate?

My rent isn’t getting any cheaper and brick-and-mortars are hard even when they’re doing well. So I kind of looked around saw an incredible team that needed career opportunities and a brand that needed a place to shine. We were already teaching our students how to make all these great sauces and selling them in the store. So it was a bit of a lightbulb moment.

Why did you decide on the pouch, not a jar?

My mom loves to paint, and she had these squeezy tubes of paint in her studio. And I’m like, « That makes me feel like painting. » I thought that maybe I could get people to want to cook by making it a more creative, fun experience. I want people to tap into that freedom of kindergarten, of self-actualizing through cooking a meal.

Speaking of, how old were your FIVE kids when you first started building all of this?

My oldest was 14, and my youngest was six. And I have, you know, however many in between.

How does the whole tribe-of-kids-and-a-demanding-business thing work?

I feel like I did my life a little bit in reverse. I got married and had kids at 25, and then started my career at 40. I was very fortunate that when I started all this my kids were a bit older and more self-sufficient. They have needs and time is not 100 percent my own, but I’m not running around with little ones.

Do you feel balanced?

I hate answering discussions about balance without being very, very mindful of the fact that I have support, and I have a babysitter that can pick up when I can’t. But, I think, for me, the more that I have on my plate, the less I can perseverate on one thing. There are times when I’m like, « This is a little bit much. » But I think I’d be a helicopter mom without work. And I think work would overwhelm me without my kids.

Do you feel like it’s good for your kids, to watch their mom build and succeed at something?

My kids, thank goodness, they tell me that they’re grateful for that almost every day. I feel like my job as a parent is basically very simple. It goes back to identity. I don’t want them to make decisions based on what I think. I want them to be able to figure out what tummies are telling them, and what they think. To do that, your kids need to know that you ALSO have a self.

What’s something you’re still working on?

Confidence in myself. For my generation, that was not something we were told to have. We were meant to be a little more self-deprecating and a little more humble. I mean, people would ask me to talk on panels about starting my own business, and I would always ask if they were sure I was the right person.

Has anyone given you any advice that’s been instrumental?

I believe it was Liz Neumark who told me that competition isn’t real. For example, you could build Haven’s Kitchen literally next door to here, and you could have cooking classes and a beautiful loft on the third floor. People might go in for their first cup of coffee, but they’re not going in for their second. Because at the end of a day, what makes a place is the energy in the space, your products, and the brand. You can’t replicate energy.

Do you have any rituals that help you stay sane?

I am a fierce guardian of my sleep. I’ve been known to leave my own dinner party and be like, « You guys are all welcome to stay. I’ve got to go nite nite. » I like taking an Epsom salt bath—they really help me go to sleep. And I read a lot of essays and memoirs.

Do you work out?

I do Kundalini yoga twice a week, which I think is probably the reason why I am alive. I’ve been doing it for 14 years, and it got me through a lot of really rough patches in my life. I don’t know what it does on a cellular level but…it’s doing it something.

What’s in your arsenal of key ingredients?

Sesame oil, lemon zest, Maldon. And I’m a Seed + Mill tahini diehard. And I think my sauces, at this point. But all that aside, I would eat pasta with bottarga, oil, and garlic every night of my life if I could.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

3 sorties kids friendly ce week-end

[ad_1]

La vente de plantes solidaire, par Bergamotte

La maison de fleurs Bergamotte ouvre ses portes le dimanche 27 janvier à l’occasion d’une vente solidaire : pour chaque plante achetée, 2 euros seront reversés au réseau d’apiculteurs « Un toit pour les abeilles ». L’occasion de dégoter des belles plantes, bouquets et fleurs séchées, tout en protégeant les abeilles, actrices clés de notre écosystème.
Au programme : mini plantes pour petits budgets, plantes tropicales… Un bon moyen d’apprendre aux plus petits l’importance de la biodiversité !


La Vente de plantes solidaire, Bergamotte
12 rue des Pyramides, Paris 75001.
Dimanche 27 janvier, de 11H à 18H.
Plus d’infos

Douce parenthèse, le slow market au coeur de Lyon

Elodie, fondatrice de webzine éthique « La Défripe » et Sophie, créatrice de l’agence Calissi et Lyon Can Do it, nous invitent à retrouver les acteurs du « slow market » le temps d’une journée, dans deux semaines.
Au programme : séance de yoga, ateliers DIY et bien-être, shopping avec Bon Fripe Bon Genre, ventes de plantes et légumes, débats et conférences animés par des pointures du secteur…
Et pour les kids ? Une programmation dédiée pour les 5-12 ans ponctuée d’ateliers participatifs (avec Eveil Actif) résolument feel good.


« Douce parenthèse – slow market »
Mob Hôtel, 55 Quai Rambaud, 69002 Lyon.
Samedi 9 février, de 10H à 19H.
Entrée libre, ateliers kids sur réservation
Plus d’infos et résa

Yoga en famille à l’Aquarium de Paris

Depuis quelques semaines, l’Aquarium de Paris propose une expérience spirituelle et visuelle des plus étonnantes : des sessions de yoga (accessible aux débutants) dans une salle entourée des plus beaux spécimens aquatiques. Une initiation yoga et méditation pour les parents et les enfants à partir de 10 ans, grâce à des postures liées à l’univers marin (comme le dauphin ou le flamant rose).
NB : préparez votre tapis et tenue de sport, puis jetez-vous à l’eau !


Yoga à l’Aquarium de Paris
5 avenue Albert de Mun, 75016 Paris
Dimanche 27 janvier, de 11h à 12H
Enfant : 10€, Parents : 20€
Plus d’infos et resa

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Le MilK Kid’s Collections SS19 est en kiosque !

[ad_1]

La mode enfantine se réinvente, tout comme le font les boutiques en matière de distribution, chacun cherchant à séduire une clientèle toujours plus exigeante. L’époque est au mélange des genres, et la Mode comme les modes de consommation évoluent en ce sens. Quand la Mode se tourne vers l’athleisure (contraction d’athlete, athlète, et de leisure, loisir), tendance consistant à conjuguer sport et style, la distribution, elle, regarde du côté phygital(contraction de physique et de digital) de la force de vente, et vise à améliorer l’expérience d’achat en boutique pour mettre les clients en confiance sur le digital. Un défi d’entertainment commercial que Le Bon Marché a relevé en rénovant les 1 600 mètres carrés de son espace enfant, conçu pour être un lieu de vie, de rencontre et de culture autant qu’un magasin. L’heure de l’hybridité a sonné.


Avec le MilK Kid’s Collection SS19, découvrez les nouvelles collections de plus de 200 marques, d’ici ou d’ailleurs. Inspirez-vous avec à nos pages tendances et creusez grâce à nos rencontres des professionnels du secteur. La bible de la mode enfantine à glisser entre toutes les mains ; curieux comme passionnés !

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Le MilK Kid’s Collections SS19 est en kiosque !

[ad_1]

La mode enfantine se réinvente, tout comme le font les boutiques en matière de distribution, chacun cherchant à séduire une clientèle toujours plus exigeante. L’époque est au mélange des genres, et la Mode comme les modes de consommation évoluent en ce sens. Quand la Mode se tourne vers l’athleisure (contraction d’athlete, athlète, et de leisure, loisir), tendance consistant à conjuguer sport et style, la distribution, elle, regarde du côté phygital(contraction de physique et de digital) de la force de vente, et vise à améliorer l’expérience d’achat en boutique pour mettre les clients en confiance sur le digital. Un défi d’entertainment commercial que Le Bon Marché a relevé en rénovant les 1 600 mètres carrés de son espace enfant, conçu pour être un lieu de vie, de rencontre et de culture autant qu’un magasin. L’heure de l’hybridité a sonné.


Avec le MilK Kid’s Collection SS19, découvrez les nouvelles collections de plus de 200 marques, d’ici ou d’ailleurs. Inspirez-vous avec à nos pages tendances et creusez grâce à nos rencontres des professionnels du secteur. La bible de la mode enfantine à glisser entre toutes les mains ; curieux comme passionnés !

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

6 flu deaths among kids reported in Canada

[ad_1]

Flu activity remains high in Canada, according to a new report released on Friday that confirms children and teens were hit hard.

A total of  17,743 laboratory-confirmed flu cases have been reported, the Public Health Agency of Canada said in its weekly FluWatch report.

Six pediatric deaths occurred so far this season, all children under the age of 10. There were also 95 pediatric admissions to ICU for flu.

Influenza A is the most common form of the virus circulating in Canada, and the majority of these viruses are H1N1. 

The Canadian report covers the period Dec. 30 to Jan. 5.

Elsewhere on Friday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated 69,000 to 84,000 Americans were hospitalized due to the flu in the last three months.

The U.S. saw one of the worst flu outbreaks in nearly a  decade during the 2017-2018 season, with more than 900,000 cases of hospitalizations and over 80,000 deaths, the CDC estimates .

The H1N1 virus is also the predominant strain in the U.S. this year. 

Flu infections bring fever, cough, general malaise and achy muscles and joints.

Health officials in both countries say  it’s not too late to get a flu vaccine to reduce the risk of contracting the virus.

They also recommend that people stay at home and not go to work or school if ill. Everyone is encouraged to wash their hands often, and to cough and sneeze into your elbow.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس