This Smoky, Spicy Chorizo Stew Will Actually Make You Look Forward to Leftovers

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As you’re skimming this story, I’m probably still eating the same stew that I made three nights ago—and loving every rust-hued spoonful of it. That’s just how good (and bountiful) senior food editor Andy Baraghani’s new chorizo and potato stew is.

It’s the thing I want to eat all winter when it’s bleak and already dark at 4 p.m. It hits all the right notes—spice that warms you from the inside! Rich, complex flavors! A touch of acid!—with heat from a sprinkle of cayenne and a lot of paprika, nubbins of salty Spanish-style chorizo, creamy potatoes, tangy sour cream, and a hit of fresh dill.

And it’s also the thing you cook all winter, because this recipe is a) incredibly fast to make, b) stupid simple (it’s mostly just cut, dump, and wait), and c) can easily feed a whole football team—or just you for, like, a week.

This recipe comes together in just 45 minutes, including cutting all the ingredients and cooking the stew. That’s because Andy built it from flavor bombs, like bacon and chorizo, that do a lot of the heavy lifting for you (and your stove). “The chorizo gives it a back bone and so much depth, so it doesn’t need to go on for hours and hours,” Andy says. Smart guy.

Another shortcut Andy recommends to add a lot of flavor with literally zero effort? Adding a hefty spoonful of sauerkraut and a little of the brine right to your bowl. “I really liked the idea of adding pickled veg, definitely something I got from Bar Tartine [in San Francisco],” Andy explains. “But you can add whatever you want—even white kimchi—and then eat it night after night after night.”

Which you should. All winter long.

Get the recipe:

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If You Care About Thanksgiving Leftovers, You Need to Make an Extra Turkey Breast

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If you want the best leftover turkey sandwich of your life, you have to make an extra turkey breast. That’s just how it works. It sounds like turkey overdose, but we promise you, you’ll thank us when you take the first bite of the sandwich that will change your day-after Thanksgiving tradition forever.

The ultimate flaw of the next-day turkey sandwich is that the turkey breast that was sliced from your beautiful bird has dried out even more in the fridge. Your mouth is going to be walking through a poultry desert no matter how much mayo you slather on that thing. That’s why you take out the ultimate turkey insurance policy. You roast a bone-in, skin-on turkey breast in addition to whatever else you’re making for Thanksgiving.

Wait, turkey breast that’s attached to the bone? But not to the turkey?

Yes, precisely. Cooking turkey breast by itself is the perfect move for turkey sandwich obsessives, because it lets you concentrate on cooking the turkey breast to perfection, without worrying about whether or not the dark meat off to the sides has finished cooking. And if you’re unfamiliar with the cut, have no fear, because a bone-in, skin-on turkey breast isn’t hard to find at your grocery store, especially around the holidays.

We like the breast to have the skin on and the bone attached, because it offers a bit of insulation for the meat, giving you a juicer, more tender turkey when you roast it. (You can definitely fry or grill the breast, but the evenly distributed heat of an oven will cook your turkey more gently—especially when you follow our method right here.) They also offer the meat an extra dose of flavor as it cooks, since they’re filled with fat, proteins, and collagen.

bone-in-turkey-breast-cut

PHOTO BY MICHAEL GRAYDON + NIKOLE HERRIOTT, FOOD STYLING BY REBECCA JURKEVICH, PROP STYLING BY KALEN KAMINSKI

Always cut against the grain!

And while we’re on the subject of flavor, you should absolutely be seasoning your turkey breast with a dry-brine. A dry-brine will deliver flavor quickly and efficiently, while taking up less space than the large, turkey-sized tub of wet brine that would be sitting in your fridge. We’re really into the dry-brine from this dry-rubbed turkey breast recipe, which is packed with coriander, fennel, kosher salt, brown sugar, and black pepper. Plus, all that salt helps break down the tough turkey fibers a bit, again helping keep everything nice and moist.

Having an untouched, perfectly-cooked breast makes slicing up meat for a turkey club the next day effortless. But it also offers a couple other options: You can serve it the night of Thanksgiving as the star of your platter—or as backup, should the breast on your main turkey end up dry. Roasting a skin-on, bone-in breast is also a great move if you’re only cooking for a couple people, or have never roasted a turkey before. It’s a more approachable, less intimidating way to get that bird on the table.

Yeah, maybe the idea of roasting an extra turkey breast seems gratuitous. But this is Thanksgiving. It comes once a year, and you better be bringing your A-game. The turkey breast is insurance that you will. Do it for yourself. Do it for your guests. But also, more importantly, do it for the sandwich.

Get the recipe:

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