Vehicle in fatal pedestrian collision leaves scene on Big River First Nation

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RCMP say a man is dead after a pedestrian collision on Big River First Nation this past weekend.

Emergency services were called at roughly 10:45 p.m. CT on Dec. 23.


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The man was pronounced dead at the scene. His name and age were not released by police.

Big River RCMP said the vehicle involved in the collision left the scene.

A forensic collision analyst is assisting with the investigation.

Big River First Nation is approximately 160 kilometres north of Saskatoon.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Toronto appears to have hit a one-year high in pedestrian and cyclist fatalities. Over 40 per cent of those deaths happened in Scarborough

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The morning of Sept. 26 began just like any other for Maria Dorsey and her partner, Jack Miehm. The pair had coffee and, before he left the house to catch a TTC bus, Jack asked what they would do for dinner that night.

“All that boring stuff, it seems like now, but it’s not boring,” Dorsey recalled.

Toronto appears to have hit a one-year high in pedestrian and cyclist fatalities. Maria Dorsey lost her Jack Miehm in September.
Toronto appears to have hit a one-year high in pedestrian and cyclist fatalities. Maria Dorsey lost her Jack Miehm in September.  (MOE DOIRON / TORONTO STAR)

“I gave him a kiss goodbye and said I’ll see you later, and that was it.”

Moments after he left the house to go help a friend with drywall work, Miehm, a 61-year-old semi-retired contractor, was struck by a driver as he crossed at a stoplight at St. Clair Ave. E. and Jeanette St. in the Scarborough Junction neighbourhood. He was about two minutes from his front door.

The impact was so powerful Miehm was thrown 50 metres, police later told Dorsey, and the side mirror of the van was ripped off. The driver fled the scene; a suspect was arrested two days later.

Those who knew him say Miehm, who had two children and two grandchildren, was a quiet, friendly man. At the time of his death, he had been recovering from a stroke he had about six years ago with what Dorsey described as characteristic optimism.

“He said, ‘it could be worse.’ That was his favourite line,” she said. “They say the voice is the first thing people (forget) when you lose someone, but I can still hear his laugh.”

Miehm was one of 46 pedestrians or cyclists who have died in Toronto so far in 2018, a number that appears to mark a recent one-year high for the city.

According to statistics compiled by the Star using police and media reports, 41 pedestrians and five cyclists, who together are classified as “vulnerable road users,” have been killed on the streets so far this year.

The most recent death occurred Friday, when a woman in her 70s was found at the intersection of Finch Ave. East and Wayside Ave. in Scarborough.

The 46 deaths so far in 2018 exceeds the number of combined pedestrian and cyclist fatalities recorded in any year in a police database that goes back to 2007. The highest number in the database is 44, which the city reached in both 2013 and 2016.

Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Brimley and Heather Rds. (Jan. 2); Steeles Ave. E. and Eastvale Dr. (Jan. 7); Eglinton Ave. E. and Birchmount Rd. (Jan. 9); Warden Ave. and Bambaugh Circle. (Jan. 24)
Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Brimley and Heather Rds. (Jan. 2); Steeles Ave. E. and Eastvale Dr. (Jan. 7); Eglinton Ave. E. and Birchmount Rd. (Jan. 9); Warden Ave. and Bambaugh Circle. (Jan. 24)  (Rene Johnston / Toronto Star; Moe Doiron / For Toronto Star)

The Star began keeping its own count of traffic deaths last year, in order to fill gaps in the police numbers, which don’t include fatalities that occur on private property or provincially owned 400 series highways.

The Star’s count for 2017 showed 41 pedestrians and four cyclists were killed that year, for a total of 45. The number of deaths in 2018 has now exceeded that total as well, with more than three weeks left in the year.

The numbers show two years after city council adopted the Vision Zero plan intended to eliminate traffic fatalities, the deaths of vulnerable road users haven’t slowed.

The city is spending $100 million over five years on the plan, which calls for reducing speed limits, deploying additional red light cameras, increasing signage, reconfiguring intersections, and adding traffic calming measures such as speed humps.

The victims in 2018 have ranged in age from 5 to 92 years old, although more than half were over the age of 55. At least four of the older victims were riding mobility scooters or motorized wheelchairs when they were killed.

Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Kennedy and William Kitchen Rds. (Feb.21); Cannongate Trail and Purcell Sq. (Feb. 27); Highway 401 and Warden Ave. (March 1); Greencedar Circuit and Daphne Rd. (March 2)
Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Kennedy and William Kitchen Rds. (Feb.21); Cannongate Trail and Purcell Sq. (Feb. 27); Highway 401 and Warden Ave. (March 1); Greencedar Circuit and Daphne Rd. (March 2)  (Rene Johnston / Toronto Star; Moe Doiron / For Toronto Star)

Those who died this year include 5-year-old cancer survivor Camila Torcato, who was pinned by a vehicle outside her school in January; 21-year-old University of Toronto student Emma Leckey, who was run down by an alleged drunk driver downtown; 54-year-old Doug Crosbie, who was clipped by a truck driver while riding his bike on Dundas St. E.; and 50-year-old Isabel Soria, who was struck by an alleged hit-and-run driver while her husband was steps away.

Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for more than 46 per cent (or 19 of 41) of pedestrian deaths this year, despite the eastern borough containing just 23 per cent of the city’s population and about 26 per cent of its road kilometrage.

A majority of the deaths in Scarborough occurred on or near wide, busy roads such as Ellesmere Rd., Warden Ave. and Victoria Park Ave.

Dorsey said drivers routinely sped down the section of St. Clair Ave. where Miehm was killed.

“We would sit in the backyard in summer, and it’s like a freeway. They race down that street, and I would say to Jack, someone’s going to get hit,” she said.

Nancy Smith Lea, director of the Toronto Centre for Active Transportation (TCAT), said the city’s wide streets “really facilitate high speeds.”

“It’s absolutely tragic that people are continuing to be killed on the streets, but it’s unfortunately not surprising because we’re still designing our streets in a way that kills people, especially outside of the downtown core,” Smith Lea said.

She said the road design in Scarborough and the city’s other suburbs, which were planned and built decades ago, have left “a challenging legacy” that can’t be quickly or easily addressed.

Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Warden Ave. and Fairfax Crescent. (July 30); Claremore Ave. and Craiglee Dr. (Aug. 6); Highway 2A, east of the Highland Creek Overpass. (Aug. 9); St. Clair Ave. and Jeanette St. (Sept. 26)
Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Warden Ave. and Fairfax Crescent. (July 30); Claremore Ave. and Craiglee Dr. (Aug. 6); Highway 2A, east of the Highland Creek Overpass. (Aug. 9); St. Clair Ave. and Jeanette St. (Sept. 26)  (Moe Doiron/For Toronto Star)

As part of Vision Zero, the city has reduced speed limits on portions of Kingston Rd., Midland Ave., Finch Ave. and other major streets, and deployed about two dozen red-light cameras in Scarborough.

But the physical changes that Smith Lea and other experts say are crucial to slow traffic and making streets safer — such as adding bike lanes and reducing pedestrian crossing distance at intersections — would take longer to install throughout Scarborough.

“There’s not a really easy answer. It’s going to take some time,” she said. She argued a key first step is getting suburban political leaders onside with road safety initiatives.

Smith Lea complained that when a coalition of groups that included her organization sent councillors a survey about making commitments to road safety in the run-up to October’s municipal election, just one out of seven incumbents running for re-election in Scarborough filled it out.

Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Sheppard Ave. E. and Allanford Rd. (Sept. 26); Victoria Park Ave. and Esquire Rd. (Sept. 29); Ellesmere and Birchmount Rds. (Nov. 9); Ellesmere and Neilson Rds. (Nov. 12)
Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were four of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Clockwise from left: Sheppard Ave. E. and Allanford Rd. (Sept. 26); Victoria Park Ave. and Esquire Rd. (Sept. 29); Ellesmere and Birchmount Rds. (Nov. 9); Ellesmere and Neilson Rds. (Nov. 12)  (Rene Johnston / Toronto Star; Moe Doiron / For Toronto Star)

Councillor Gary Crawford, who represents Ward 20, Scarborough Southwest, didn’t fill out the survey. But he blamed a particularly chaotic election season, and said he has heard loud and clear from voters that road safety is a priority issue.

“Major roads, even residential roads out in the suburbs, Scarborough in particular, were designed for certain speeds,” Crawford said.

He singled out Kingston Rd. in particular as a trouble area because it’s “almost a major highway, but it is through residential areas.”

Crawford said in addition to lowering speeds on the street, he’d like the city to consider adding on-street parking in order to slow drivers.

The councillor, who served as Mayor John Tory’s budget chief during this council term, said he could support accelerating and adding more funding to Vision Zero if city staff recommended it.

“Every death is absolutely tragic. We need to continue doing what we’re doing with our Vision Zero. We need to continue the investments, and if need be through the advice of staff, further enhance these,” he said.

Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were two of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Left: Bellamy Rd. N. and Cedar Brae Blvd. (Nov. 25); Midland and Dorcot Aves. (Dec. 4).
Incidents in Scarborough have accounted for almost 40 per cent of pedestrian deaths this year. These were two of the Scarborough intersections where fatalities occurred, and the corresponding date of the incident. Left: Bellamy Rd. N. and Cedar Brae Blvd. (Nov. 25); Midland and Dorcot Aves. (Dec. 4).  (Andrew Francis Wallace / Toronto Star; Rene Johnston / Toronto Star)

Don Peat, a spokesperson for the mayor, said Tory “firmly believes the central message of Vision Zero that fatalities and serious injuries on our roads are preventable, and we must strive to reduce traffic-related deaths and injuries to zero.”

Peat said the mayor has joined with a majority of council and supported expanding Vision Zero, and receives “regular updates” on the implementation of road safety measures “to ensure the work is being done as quickly as possible.”

Tory initially supported a version of the road safety plan put forward by city staff in 2016, which set a target of reducing traffic deaths and serious injury by 20 per cent over 10 years. Under heavy criticism from safety advocates, Tory supported changing the plan to set a goal of eliminating road deaths altogether.

Ben Spurr is a Toronto-based reporter covering transportation. Reach him by email at bspurr@thestar.ca or follow him on Twitter: @BenSpurr

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Man in his 60s dies as Toronto matches last year’s high for pedestrian and cyclist deaths

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Two years after city council approved a plan to end traffic deaths, Toronto appears to have matched a recent one-year high for pedestrian and cyclist fatalities.

The latest death occurred on Tuesday, when Toronto police Const. David Hopkinson said a man in his 60s died after being struck by a vehicle at Midland and Dorcot Aves., near Donwood Park Public School in Scarborough.

The latest death occurred on Tuesday, when Toronto police Const. David Hopkinson said a man in his 60s died after being struck by a vehicle at Midland and Dorcot Aves., near Donwood Park Public School in Scarborough.
The latest death occurred on Tuesday, when Toronto police Const. David Hopkinson said a man in his 60s died after being struck by a vehicle at Midland and Dorcot Aves., near Donwood Park Public School in Scarborough.  (Rick Madonik / Toronto Star)

According to statistics compiled by the Star using police and media reports, 45 pedestrians and cyclists have been killed so far this year.

With 27 days left in the year, the total ties the Star’s count for all of 2017. It also exceeds the number of pedestrian and cyclist deaths recorded in any single year in a police database that goes back to 2007.

The Star’s pedestrian and cyclist death counts differs from the one maintained by police. That’s in part because Toronto police figures don’t include deadly collisions that happen on private property, such as in the parking lots of apartment buildings or malls, or on provincial 400-series highways within Toronto.

The Star tracked these incidents since 2017, but does not have independent data for previous years.

It’s unclear if this year’s total surpasses previous years overall, as the Star does not have independent data on pedestrian and cyclist deaths before 2007.

Tuesday night’s victim was struck while crossing the street. Police responded to a call for personal injury collision around 7:30 p.m. and found the man on the ground without vital signs. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said the driver remained with the victim. There was no immediate word on whether charges would be laid.

The incident brings the total number of pedestrians killed so far this year to 40. Five cyclists have also died.

The police count does not include the death of a cyclist in Don Mills who hit a parked vehicle, or a man killed by an alleged hit-and-run driver in the parking garage of an apartment building.

In July 2016, city council approved a road safety plan dubbed Vision Zero, the stated goal of which is to eliminate serious injuries and deaths on the roads. Council has allocated more than $100 million to the five-year plan.

The Star omitted the death of a waste collector who died on the job when he was crushed by a garbage truck’s side loader. The police recorded that incident as a traffic death.

The man who died Tuesday night was one of three pedestrians killed in the GTA in less than six hours. A female pedestrian was pronounced dead at the scene after being struck by a vehicle in Mississauga on Tuesday evening, and another female pedestrian was fatally struck in Mississauga around 2 p.m.

Emerald Bensadoun is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @twerk_vonnegut

Ben Spurr is a Toronto-based reporter covering transportation. Reach him by email at bspurr@thestar.ca or follow him on Twitter: @BenSpurr

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Pedestrian bridge connecting condo to school partially collapses, no injuries reported

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Parts of a pedestrian bridge that connects an East York condo to an elementary school collapsed early Saturday morning, leaving a hole in the middle of the walkway.

Toronto Fire Services got a call at 6:22 a.m. about concrete that had fallen from the underside of the bridge. When they arrived, there was a hole in the bridge, which stands 5 metres off the ground.

Mayor John Tory said he will inquire with officials about how the bridge could have collapsed and look at its maintenance throughout the year.
Mayor John Tory said he will inquire with officials about how the bridge could have collapsed and look at its maintenance throughout the year.  (John Tory via Twitter)

The bridge is commonly used by students to get to Crescent Town Elementary School, but there were no injuries reported. “We will be advising parents that the bridge is not accessible until further notice,” Ryan Bird, Toronto District School Board spokesperson, said in an email.

The bridge is owned by both the TDSB and Pinedale Properties, the owner of the condo. Bird said Pinedale’s portion of the bridge was the section that collapsed and that the TDSB has secured it’s own side of the bridge.

Toronto Fire noticed there had been reinforcements placed on the bridge, indicating work had been previously done on the infrastructure.

Mayor John Tory visited the school later in the day, tweeting that it was a “miracle” it happened when no one was crossing the bridge to go to school.

“I will be making inquiries of (TDSB and Pinedale) as to how the bridge got into this state including a review of repairs done in the past year,” he tweeted. “I will also be asking questions about inspections done on this bridge (and) others like it.”

Bianca Bharti is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @biancabharti

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Pedestrian hit and killed by vehicle in Scarborough

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A woman was hit by a vehicle and killed in Scarborough Monday evening, Toronto police say.

Officers responded to reports of an injured pedestrian near Ellesmere and Neilson Rds. shortly after 6:20 p.m. A woman who is believed to be in her 40s suffered serious injuries and her vital signs were absent, paramedics said.

She died at the scene.

The driver of the vehicle is co-operating with investigators, Toronto police Const. Allyson Douglas-Cook said.

Ellesmere Rd. was closed between Neilson Rd. and Morningside Ave. for an extended period of time while police investigated.

Thirty-six pedestrians and five cyclists have been killed on Toronto streets so far this year, according to figures compiled by the Star.

The combined total of 41 cyclist and pedestrian deaths is the highest by this date in any year since 2007, which is the earliest available year in police data.

The Star’s traffic fatality numbers are higher than the official police count. That’s in part because Toronto police figures don’t include deadly collisions that happen on private property, such as in the parking lots of apartment buildings or malls, or on provincial 400-series highways within Toronto.

November is often one of the worst months for traffic collisions in the city.

From 2007 to 2017, 46 pedestrians and cyclists were killed on Toronto streets in the month of November — the highest total for any month over that period.

Claire Floody is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @claire_floody

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Female pedestrian dead, man in hospital after rush hour collision with vehicle in Scarborough

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A pedestrian is dead and another injured after they were struck by a vehicle in Scarborough during the Friday morning rush hour.

At 6:49 a.m., police responded to a collision in the area of Birchmount and Ellesmere Rds. They found a woman unresponsive. She was later pronounced dead.

A man was found conscious and breathing and was transported to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Police say the driver of the vehicle remained on the scene.

Ellesmere is closed between Birchmount and Rolark Dr. while police investigate. TTC vehicles are diverting at the intersection.

Ilya Bañares is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @ilyaoverseas

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Pedestrian sustains serious injuries after collision near Dufferin and Wingold

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A man has sustained serious injuries after he was struck by a vehicle near the city’s Briar Hill neighbourhood on Monday evening, Toronto police said.

They responded to a call just before 7 p.m. near Dufferin St. and Wingold Ave. The pedestrian, who is thought to be between 50 and 60-years-old, was rushed to a trauma centre.

The driver remained on the scene. Portions of roads in the area are closed.

Stefanie Marotta is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @StefanieMarotta

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Calgary police report 5 pedestrian deaths in 2018, up from 2 in 2017 – Calgary

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Calgary police confirm five pedestrians have been killed so far in 2018, up from only two deaths in all of 2017.

The total number of pedestrian-involved collisions is expected to be made available next week, but the city is already taking note of the recent rash of incidents.

Police have responded to multiple pedestrian-involved collisions over the course of the last two weeks.  A 70-year-old man hit on Thursday was taken to hospital in life-threatening condition, but has since improved.  Days earlier, another man in his 70s died after being hit by a vehicle downtown.  A three-year-old boy was also killed last Friday, after being hit by a vehicle in northwest Calgary.


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“It was a deadly week,” said Ward 7 councillor Druh Farrell. “So we should be learning from every one of these incidents so that we can look to prevent them.”

According to city officials, pedestrians are involved in around one per cent of collisions, but account for 15 per cent of the total number of casualties on city streets.

“It is a little bit unusual, but not unprecedented that we have a number of collisions that are clustered together,” said City of Calgary traffic safety leader Tony Churchill. “We’re trending similar to previous years.”

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The conversation around pedestrian safety has been top of mind recently, with the frequency of these collisions and the debate over lowering residential speed limits.  A video also surfaced this week of a fifth grader trying to cross Acadia Drive S.E. at an unmarked crosswalk, with cars zipping by.

Churchill said the city is working to tackle the issue.

“Traffic calming, putting in enhanced crossings and other things like modifying our traffic signals so that pedestrians get a little bit of a head start before traffic starts to move,” Churchill said, describing some of the measures the city is pursuing.

According to Churchill, 130 rectangular rapid flashing beacons have been installed, enhancements have been made to overhead flashing lights at multiple crosswalks around the city. Traffic calming has also been installed at over 60 locations.


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Bridgeland is one of the pilot locations for the traffic-calming curbs — a measure the community association believes is already making a difference.

“It’s a massive improvement,” said Bridgeland-Riverside Community Association planning director Ali McMillan. “People saunter across the crosswalk now and they don’t feel that they have to hurry through the intersection. They’re so much more visible than they were before.”

Officials hope to be able to implement more of the strategy, but it depends on budget talks later this year.

“We’re going to continue doing all that work,” Churchill said. “Council indicated they may be funding that pedestrian strategy in a more meaningful way, so that’s really positive.”

The city is hosting community traffic safety meetings to give residents a chance to raise concerns about problem areas.

The plan is to take that feedback and use it to implement the pedestrian strategy, pending the funding in next year’s budget.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Serious pedestrian crash has 120th St closed in all directions: police – BC

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The Delta police were on the scene of a serious collision involving a pedestrian at 90th Ave and 120th St. on Tuesday night.

Both directions were closed on Scott Rd. from Nordel Way to 90th Ave.

There was no word as of press time when the road would be open again.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Hikers tour St. Jacques Escarpment to celebrate park, pedestrian walkway plans – Montreal

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About a dozen people walked through the St. Jacques Escarpment eco-territory in celebration of the city’s move to save the area, as well as plans to build a pedestrian walkway over the Turcot Interchange.

“We’re celebrating. We’re having a walk and we’re doing a potluck,” Lisa Mintz said.

Mintz is an activist with Sauvons La Falaise, a group advocating for the protection of the escarpment. The group cried foul when they found out the walkway was floated by Transports Quebec due to its estimated $40 million cost.

But in June, the city and the provincial government announced that the pedestrian bridge would be part of the Turcot plans.


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The walkway will link the boroughs of LaSalle, Lachine, the Sud-Ouest and Côte-des-Neiges—Notre-Dame-de-Grâce.

“All we need to do is connect west to Meadowbrook and that can be done when the Saint-Pierre interchange is being rebuilt,” Mintz said. “And then we have bike paths to take us to Mount-Royal, we have a green belt for Montreal.”

“This is so self-evident and simple and it doesn’t even cost anything because we’re not asking anybody to buy anything,” Mintz added.

“The infrastructure is being rebuilt right now — this is the time to do it and we can have what Montreal really, really needs.”

The City of Montreal’s vision for the park and walkway.

City of Montreal

Also part of the plan is turning the St. Jacques Escarpment into a “grand park,” which includes adding 30 hectares on the Turcot yards to the green space. “That was the exciting thing that I didn’t even know about,” Mintz said.

The move would protect wetlands and wooded areas, one of the reasons Mintz and her group mobilized.


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The City of Montreal is currently conducting public consultations for Montrealers to weigh in on what they want their park to look like.

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The next consultation is taking place October 25 at 7:00 p.m. at the Gadbois recreation complex on 5485 Chemin de la Côte-Saint-Paul.

Work to build the walkway is expected to begin in 2020.

With files from Billy Shields, Rachel Lau, Dan Spector, Elysia Bryan-Baynes and Phil Carpenter. 

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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