Hawaij Spice Is the Warming Spice Blend I’ll Take Over Pumpkin Spice Any Day | Healthyish

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Last month, I tried my first pumpkin spice latte (I’m not an alien, just British). Actually, it was half of a PSL, because I was defeated by its cloying sweetness before I could finish. Suffice to say I won’t be ordering another any time soon, but it did make me think about—and crave—pumpkin spice’s punchier, less basic cousin: hawaij.

Pronounced “hu-why-adge, » hawaij refers to two, distinct Yemenite spice blends, one sweet and one savory. Hawaij means “mixture” in Arabic and has long been a staple in the Yemenite-Jewish kitchen where the savory version—a blend of cumin, coriander, turmeric, black pepper, and cardamom—is used most often for soup. But it’s the sweet one, coined “hawaij for coffee,” that I’ve found to be the perfect spice for winter sipping, baking, and more.

Hawaij spice blend 1

Photo by Chelsie Craig

This hawaij blend is one of my favorites.

Much like my first cigarette, the first time I tried hawaij (in coffee, the traditional way) involved acting cool while stifling the need to cough. Only instead of a rugged bartender, I was trying to impress a balding seventy-year-old Yemenite man named Shlomo, a coffee shop owner in Tel Aviv’s Yemenite Quarter.

Ginger and cardamom are always front and center in this warming, heady mix which, more often than not, features cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Some blends, like Raw Spice Bar’s, include fennel for a flicker of anise. All Spice Emporium’s mix stands out with its cheeky addition of tangerine zest, which I’m not mad at, and its colourful packaging would make a great stocking filler. Trusty Pereg hits all the right notes with this classic mix which will stand the test of time.

If you’re all about authenticity, hawaij for coffee should be brewed with or served on top of, yes, a strong cup of coffee, but it would also make a great addition to lattes or a mug of hot chocolate for a toasty kick. If you’re willing to totally depart from tradition, it would make an excellent addition to baked goods, either combined with sugar to be sprinkled on snickerdoodle cookies, folded into gingerbread dough, or mixed into a frosting to be dolloped generously on top of a carrot cake. It also works wonderfully in savory dishes like slow-cooked stews—a sweeter alternative to ras el hanout.

Go ahead and get creative, just don’t tell Shlomo. And if he asks, you didn’t hear it from me.

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Teal Pumpkin Project aims to make Halloween less scary for allergy sufferers – Regina

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For parents with children who have food allergies, Halloween can be a scary time, but the Teal Pumpkin Project aims to make Halloween safe for everyone.

Launched by Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) in 2014, the project provides an alternative for kids with food allergies.

Instead of the traditional Halloween candy, people are encouraged to hand out non-food items like stickers, glow sticks and other trinkets.


READ MORE:
Teal Pumpkin Project aims to make Halloween safer and inclusive

In order to participate, all it takes is a teal pumpkin or a sign letting the little trick-or-treaters know there are allergy safe options available. There’s also a map where people can register their homes.

Abigail Frasz decided to join thousands worldwide by participating in Regina’s Teal Pumpkin Project for the first time this year.

“There was one year a little boy came up to the house and said, ‘Oh no I can’t have that, I just want to show you my costume,’ and his mom mouthed and went, ‘Food allergy’ and I went, ‘Oh,’” Frasz said.

According to Food Allergy Canada, nearly 500,000 children are affected across the country.


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Having a daughter with food allergies, Megan Kaytor started promoting the project in Regina two years ago.

“Peanuts is a huge one and many people do offer the non-peanut treats, but for ones like mine who can’t eat any dairy, gluten, soy, eggs, it’s very limiting,” Kaytor said.

While it’s slowly growing, Kaytor hopes more people will start participating.

“Last year I think there was about 12 houses, and this year when I saw the map there was only three so I started promoting it,” Kaytor said. “I started sharing the links; now there’s 25 houses on the map.”


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As another option, the City of Regina is also selling healthy Halloween passes for a free child admission to any leisure facility.

“We invite residents who are interested in offering healthy options or healthy options and candy, or allergy-free options to buy a pack of 10 child and youth admissions for five dollars and give those out [on Halloween],” said Melissa Coderre, coordinator of business services for the City of Regina.

Meanwhile, Frasz is busy getting ready for her favourite spooky holiday, knowing she’s helping make a difference.

“It doesn’t take very much time to make a kid’s day,” Frasz said, “and putting a little positivity out there is what our community needs and I’m glad this will keep growing.”

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The Great Pumpkin Bread Recipe Is Here

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There’s no other way to say this, but this pumpkin bread is moist. (DEAL WITH IT.) It’s even moister—which isn’t a word—the day after baking. No one wants a dry pumpkin bread, a mouthful of over-spiced regret, and no one certainly wants a mushy loaf, a soggy forkful of fall’s failings. We want a moist loaf. M-O-I-S-T. Find out what it means to me.

It means a lot. And to Molly Baz too. She developed this new recipe and didn’t want a typical vegetable oil quick bread. “Let’s resurrect the pumpkin bread from its sad sorry Starbucks state!” She declared. Okay!!!!

Olive oil brings a buttery, barely grassy note that goes well with pumpkin (“because pumpkin…comes from the earth,” she told me to which I replied 🤔) and it’s what makes the bread moist but never mushy. Molly played with the ratio of flour to fat for weeks until she reached perfection. And since I tasted it, I can concur. Perfection.

What else is inside this thing? A heaping dose of AUTUMNAL FLAVOR, that’s what! Cinnamon, nutmeg, a pinch of clove. This specific canned pumpkin. And fresh ginger, not the dry powder stuff. “I didn’t use pumpkin spice mix because I don’t believe in all the spices in that blend,” said Molly. She doesn’t believe in ground ginger. “People use ⅛ teaspoon a year and then it gets stale and flat in their pantry. Use fresh!” It brings a spicier, more dynamic flavor.

ba pumpkin bread 1

Photo by Chelsie Craig, Food Styling by Kate Buckens

ZOOMSCOPE: Crunchy rooftop.

On top we’ve got a rooftop of crunchy pumpkin seeds and sugar to make the whole thing shimmer in the evening moonlight. “Basic b*tches love glitter and so do I, let’s be honest,” said Molly.

ba pumpkin bread 2

Photo by Chelsie Craig, Food Styling by Kate Buckens

MAPLE BUTTER.

Don’t forget the side dish of whipped maple butter, light and airy and just a bit salty. It’s best made with an electric mixer, but you can paddle the maple syrup into room temperature butter with a spatula if you can’t be bothered. It won’t be as fluffy, but you’ll have maple butter. There are worse things.

“If I’m not picking apples this weekend,” Molly concluded, “I’ll be making pumpkin bread, and I hope the rest of the world is too.”

Get the recipe:

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Pumpkin Bread with Maple Butter Recipe

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Whisk eggs, pumpkin purée, ginger, and 1½ cups sugar in a large bowl. Stream in oil, whisking constantly until mixture is homogeneous. Gently fold half of dry ingredients into egg mixture until no dry spots remain. Repeat with remaining dry ingredients, stirring to combine but being careful not to overmix.

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