First let’s talk about basic Indigenous rights, then we’ll get to reconciliation

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Reconciliation is now officially over.

To be fair, it was always a slow, meandering, broken-down engine, limping along the track, led by politicians who never quite knew where the train was going.

Most Indigenous leaders never use the word “reconciliation” because it is not plausible when First Peoples are still fighting for basic human rights — for water, land, social services, health care and education.

The reality of 2019 looks a lot like Canada’s colonial past.

This week, we are seeing this play out clearly and painfully on two separate but related fronts.

Law since 1876, the Indian Act is a paternalistic piece of legislation that has historically governed every aspect of Indigenous life in Canada. Through it, Canada established the residential schools, and to this day the act dictates who can receive treaty rights and who cannot.

Blackstock told Canada in July 2018 that the definition of “First Nations child” for the purpose of implementing Jordan’s Principle needed to be broadened. First Nations children without status who live off-reserve but are recognized as members of their nation should not be excluded, she argued. It should be up to the nations, not the government, to determine who is a member of the community.

“Children in life-threatening situations shouldn’t be left holding the bag,” Blackstock said. “I don’t want this to be about blood quantum.”

Then, last November, she heard of a case of a 20-month-old girl with congenital hyperinsulism – a condition that causes excessive insulin secretion. The baby did not have status but her mother and maternal grandmother do.

Ottawa refused to foot the $1,400 bill for the child’s diagnostic test so the society paid for it.

This, after Blackstock spent more than a decade fighting Canada to live up to the simple promise of treating all children equally and after the human rights tribunal repeatedly rebuked the feds.

For a period, Ottawa seemed to be coming around, providing thousands of children with services they were previously denied.

Then, suddenly, all that good progress seemed to grind to a halt. “Why?,” asked Blackstock. “Is it the upcoming federal election? Did the amount of money (needed) dawn on them? Or was it the depth of the discrimination?”

Blackstock, who emphasizes that she isn’t in this fight to make Ottawa “look bad,” will be asking for an order for the government to provide urgent health services to children pending a full hearing.

“Our job is to make sure they spend the money to treat all children with equity. The government has the money. They have to stop prioritizing other matters over children,” she said.

Blackstock’s battle is taking place as the country heaves and ruptures from the arrests of 14 First Nations people in Northern British Columbia defending their own land against a pipeline. Late Monday, heavily armed members of the RCMP climbed over wooden sticks and handcuffed these land defenders. The hereditary chiefs and their supporters are trying to safeguard the land for all of Canada’s children, Indigenous or not, from a proposed natural gas pipeline on their territory.

At first glance, these two events might seem entirely separate but they are intertwined.

They are aspects of the same fight — to be fairly, legally recognized in a country that spins stories about the sincerity of reconciliation and the importance of nation-to-nation agreements. Not to mention adhering to international law.

As Ottawa continues to fall short of upholding Indigenous rights, the emptiness of its promises of reconciliation are laid bare.

What does it mean, for instance, that Canada signed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which states, “Indigenous peoples shall not be forcibly removed from their lands or territories”?

What does it mean that Canada signed the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, whose first principle states that every child is entitled to rights without “distinction or discrimination” on account of race, colour, sex, political or other opinion?

We are still waiting for Canada to live up to its word.

Tanya Talaga is a Toronto-based columnist covering Indigenous issues. Follow her on Twitter: @tanyatalaga

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B.C. RCMP bosses talk challenges faced in 2018, including future of Surrey policing

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With 2018 nearly in the rear-view mirror, the B.C. RCMP’s leadership team reached out to Global News to provide their perspective on the year that was.

Deputy Commissioner Brenda Butterworth-Carr said she wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on the force’s successes and challenges as well as to highlight the complexity of some of the operations that RCMP officers faced in the past year.

Among the accomplishments the deputy commissioner wanted to highlight was the technological advancement the force has been taking on.


READ MORE:
New leader of B.C. RCMP is first indigenous woman to hold the title

“We’ll be piloting digital evidence, continuing to advance our interactions with Crown…those are things where we can take advantage of modern technologies that are available to us,” she said.

The conversation quickly veered towards one of the biggest stories the B.C. RCMP faced in 2018: the public inquest into the suicide of Sgt. Pierre Lemaitre.

WATCH: Coverage of the Pierre Lemaitre inquest on Globalnews.ca


Lemaitre was the force’s spokesperson during the fallout from the Tasering death of Robert Dziekanski at Vancouver International Airport in 2007. The inquest found Lemaitre was traumatized after being forced by his superiors to lie about the circumstances that led to Dziekanski’s death; Lemaitre took his own life in 2013.


READ MORE:
Inquest recommends Mounties make mental health assessments mandatory

Butterworth-Carr said she wasn’t in a position to say whether Lemaitre was betrayed by the RCMP but noted that she and the force had learned lessons from the inquest, which made recommendations for improvements in supporting the mental health of RCMP officers.

“I think there’s room where we’re going to continue to improve,” she said. “I think it’s an area we need to invest in more and continue to invest in.”

Assistant commissioners Eric Stubbs and Kevin Hackett, who joined Butterworth-Carr for the interview, agreed that a progressive culture is necessary and that the leadership team is committed to improving the RCMP’s workplace culture, although they’ve also heard positive feedback.


READ MORE:
‘They want to disappear’: psychiatrist speaks to Mounties’ PTSD struggle

“There are a lot of challenges that the RCMP is facing operationally, administratively and internally, perhaps,” Stubbs said. “But all three of us travel the province on a regular basis, and we’re in town halls and detachments and we’re talking to our members a lot and we see a lot of positivity out there.”

“If people feel like they’re respected in the workplace, if they feel they’ve got meaningful work and contribute and they’re listened to, then that will increase morale,” added Hackett.

To date, more than 3,000 women have made harassment claims against the RCMP as part of a class-action lawsuit. When asked if she had ever faced harassment in her career, Butterworth-Carr was diplomatic.


READ MORE:
‘Nothing has changed’: Ex-Mounties take aim at RCMP during inquest

“I’ve certainly worked with challenging individuals earlier on in my career,” she said.

“I can’t speak to the reasons they behaved the way they did, but I can tell you that in the course of my career I’ve been very willing to stand up and convey challenges or things that needed improvement and continued to provide that environment.”

WATCH: Coverage of Surrey’s switch to a municipal police force on Globalnews.ca


As for Surrey’s decision to move to a municipal police force, Butterworth-Carr wouldn’t say if she thought there was any possibility the RCMP might stay in the city.


READ MORE:
Surrey mayor’s policing comments risk ‘erosion of public trust,’ says B.C.’s top Mountie

The new Surrey city council severed its contract with the RCMP shortly after entering office in November, the first step in its plan to create its own municipal police force within two years. In the meantime, the deputy commissioner said she was concerned about shortfalls during the transition.

“I think whenever we see a potential lack of investment it causes me angst, and that would be the same with any of our municipalities,” she said.

As for the future, Butterworth-Carr said her leadership team plans to take further steps to push the force into the modern age.

“Certainly being a lot more tenacious within the social media environment as well and equipping people with the ability to get out in front of news stories,” she said.

“[We want to] be proactive and take opportunities when they present themselves.”

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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REAL TALK – Influenceurs et partenariats

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Un sujet que j’avais envie d’aborder depuis longtemps :
les paaaaah-rtenariats !

Mais pas que… Cette vidéo est aussi l’occasion, je l’espère, de se poser des questions sur notre rapport aux réseaux sociaux, sur notre consommation de contenus, sur la confiance et le libre arbitre, sur les attentes que l’on peut avoir vis à vis des « influenceurs »…

♥ LOVE SUR VOUS ♥

 

✘ JE PORTE ✘

• Robe Ba&sh (ancienne co)

• Boucles d’oreilles Lak Lak

• Collier Marine Mistake

 

Vous aimerez aussi

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Trudeau to meet federal party leaders to talk support for French Canadians in wake of Ford cuts

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will meet with the leaders of the four other main federal political parties Wednesday to discuss what can be done to support French Canadians in the wake of Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s recent cuts.

The session was mentioned in Trudeau’s daily itinerary report, which said only that the prime minister was meeting to discuss « issues facing the Canadian Francophonie » with the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh, the Green Party’s Elizabeth May, the Conservatives’ Andrew Scheer and the interim leader of the Bloc Québécois, Mario Beaulieu.

A senior government official speaking on background told CBC that the Wednesday afternoon meeting is being held in response to cuts the Ford government made to some French language services in Ontario.

In its fall economic update, Ford’s government announced it would be cancelling a plan to build a long-awaited French-language university in Toronto and would be abolishing the position of the French language services commissioner.

Last week, after widespread criticism, Ford backed down to a degree, sticking to his decision to cancel the French-language university but restoring the position of a French language services commissioner under the province’s ombudsman. 

He also named Attorney General Caroline Mulroney as a new minister of francophone affairs and said he would hire a senior policy adviser responsible for francophone affairs.

Trudeau’s meeting will also address the concerns of francophones in other provinces – including New Brunswick, Canada’s only official bilingual province, where the new Progressive Conservative government has just one elected francophone member.

Reaching out

Following Ford’s cuts, Scheer himself was accused by some critics of failing to swiftly condemn them or demand that they be reversed.

On Monday morning, Scheer’s office sent Trudeau a letter requesting an urgent meeting to discuss the issue.

The Prime Minister’s Office welcomed the idea, according to the government official, and invited other party leaders to attend as well.

The official also argued that the Trudeau PMO has made a point of reaching out to the opposition in the past — most recently on the renegotiation of NAFTA and the imposition of U.S. tariffs on Canadian goods and resources.

The Green Party’s Elizabeth May said her policy has always been that when a prime minister asks for help she is happy to lend a hand, as she did when she answered a similar call for former prime minister Stephen Harper. 

« I am very concerned about what Ford has threatened to do to the rights of franco-Ontarians, » she said. « I am happy to offer whatever help or advice is called for in the circumstances to protect minority rights. »

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How to Talk to Your Parents About Weed This Holiday Season | Healthyish

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There are a few cardinal rules to surviving the holidays with your extended family: Dodge inquiries into your dating life, choose political debates wisely, and never talk about recreational drugs.

This holiday season, the latter may be impossible to avoid. With baby boomers becoming the fastest growing cannabis consumers, even if your pops isn’t hitting a vape, chances are he’s read a headline about it. With CBD proliferating across the wellness world and the recent legalization of cannabis in Canada, older generations are letting go of stoner stereotypes and getting curious about weed 2.0.

But, kind of like that one Thanksgiving when you taught a masterclass on emojis, your relatives will need an education on cannabis as well. The internet is a confusing place to learn about weed, so here’s a handy guide to the most common questions you’ll get asked about this brave new weed world…and how to handle them.

Slow down, kid. Doesn’t weed just get you high?

Not all weed.

There are over 140 known compounds found in weed, and only one gets you high. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) intoxicates users by binding to receptors in your central nervous system. You can breed plants to have higher or lower THC levels, which is why some weed can get you really, really high—it’s been GMO’ed to be that way.

THC also affects appetite and may reduce inflammation, but it’s the other compounds in cannabis that may help regulate pain, treat acne, and reduce anxiety, no high included.

So what’s that trendy thing called? BSB? CBGB?

Cannabidiol a.k.a CBD is another abundant compound found in cannabis. CBD is also found in hemp, which has low levels of THC and is gray-area legal. (The FDA recently approved its use in one drug—Epidiolex.) Unlike THC, from what we know, CBD doesn’t bind to receptors in your central nervous system. Instead it interacts mostly with your CB2 receptors, which are found all over the body including the digestive tract, peripheral nervous system, epidermis, and immune cells.

While it won’t cure all your ills and file your tax returns, there are preliminary studies that indicate it helps with a host of things like pain, acne, and anxiety without the high. Combine that with it being technically legal in most states and you have the hottest trend in wellness.

But weed is still illegal, right?

It’s complicated. If you live in one of the nine recreationally legalized states, it’s legal. If you qualify for a medical condition in 30 states and get a medical card, it’s legal. If you’re in one of the 35 states that have a hemp pilot program, hemp-derived CBD is legal through your state’s hemp pilot program.

See? Very complicated.

Not if you’re in Canada. On October 17th, Canada became the first G7 country to legalize weed recreationally, meaning anyone who visits can buy it. Just make sure Uncle Ted doesn’t try to bring any back, because that’s a federal crime.

Is hemp the same as weed? And is that carton of hemp milk going to get me high?

The best way to think about hemp is that it’s cannabis that’s been bred to remove most of the THC. The U.S. government recognizes any cannabis plant that has less than .3% THC as industrial hemp. Currently, it’s gray-area legal but will be legalized federally soon as Mitch McConnell (yes that Mitch McConnell) is pushing a controversial farm bill.

If you’re in a legalized state for cannabis, we recommend buying CBD, THC, and anything that is cannabis-based from a dispensary, which is a state-licensed store that has purity standards. If you’re shopping for CBD on the unregulated hemp market, read this article.

Will I get addicted to weed? It’s so much stronger than when I was your age.

Based on the research we have, you won’t get addicted to CBD. THC does have addiction rates but they’re lower than alcohol and cigarettes.

If you’re wondering why weed is so much stronger, it’s because certain strains have been genetically modified to be that way. Much like you can breed corn to be pesticide-resistant, weed is just like any other agricultural product. Some strains have a lot of THC, some have very little. Age can also impact how you tolerate cannabis so, the older you get, the more careful you need to be.

If you want something milder than Girl Scout Cookies (google it), try strains and products that have higher CBD than THC levels. Ratios that are 1:1 CBD:THC or higher are a safe bet for a mild high. Strains like ACDC, Charlotte’s Web, Sweet and Sour Widow, or Stephen Hawking Kush (no lie) are all CBD-dominant or balanced strains that mitigate the impact of THC.

If you have a history of addiction, we recommend speaking with your doctor before experimenting with any cannabis strains.

What happens if I take too much CBD?

Unlike shots of tequila, CBD has a bell curve response rate. More CBD doesn’t mean stronger results. Everyone has their own “Goldilocks Zone,” and the only known side effect of taking too much CBD is drowsiness.

My back hurts. Will weed help?

For localized pain relief—aching muscles, sore joints—try a topical cannabis product. Topicals with THC can enter your bloodstream and make you high, so if you don’t want that, use a CBD topical instead. CBD on its own has been shown to help with inflammation. That being said, there is some research on mice showing full-spectrum (whole plant including at least some THC) as a more effective way to consume CBD. If you aren’t worried about trace amounts of THC, try the full-spectrum topical to see how you feel.

Smoking is bad for you!

We’ve come a long way from bong rips and roaches. You rub cannabis on your face and joints, slap on a transdermal patch, or take a tincture and hold it under your tongue. In other words, smoking isn’t the only way to feel the benefits of weed. The great thing about legalization? Better access to a wider range of products and more innovation.

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REAL TALK – Influenceurs et partenariats

[ad_1]

Un sujet que j’avais envie d’aborder depuis longtemps :
les paaaaah-rtenariats !

Mais pas que… Cette vidéo est aussi l’occasion, je l’espère, de se poser des questions sur notre rapport aux réseaux sociaux, sur notre consommation de contenus, sur la confiance et le libre arbitre, sur les attentes que l’on peut avoir vis à vis des « influenceurs »…

♥ LOVE SUR VOUS ♥

 

✘ JE PORTE ✘

• Robe Ba&sh (ancienne co)

• Boucles d’oreilles Lak Lak

• Collier Marine Mistake

 

Vous aimerez aussi

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Kingston’s mayoral candidates walk and talk with Bill Hutchins – Kingston

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With the municipal elections fast approaching, Global Kingston spoke with each of Kingston’s four mayoral candidates to ask them why they are running this time around.

If you’re still undecided, watch these in-depth interviews with each candidate to help you decide between Eric Lee, Rob Matheson, Bryan Paterson and Vicki Schmolka on Oct. 22.

Global Kingston will also be airing a mayoral debate on Oct. 17, so be sure to stay tuned to Global Kingston or to watch the debate online.

Eric Lee

Eric Lee is known to many Kingstonians as the ‘elevator guy’ from the old S&R Department days.

Although Lee doesn’t have any political experience, he is hoping to rise to the top floor of city politics. He lists tax reform as one of the key platforms in his first-ever campaign for mayor. Lee says he wants to repeal the vacancy tax rebate law, which he blames for the number of vacant storefronts in the city’s downtown core at the moment.

He also wants to focus on protecting tenants from landlords, who he says don’t take care of their properties despite tenant complaints.


READ MORE:
‘I’m the person for this’: Eric Lee, 68, files to join Kingston mayoral race

Watch the full interview below:






Rob Matheson

Rob Matheson served one term as city councillor for the Loyalist-Cataraqui District from 2006 to 2010 and then left politics to become a local cab driver.

He has also run for mayor once before, and councillor in the last municipal election for the Trillium District, loosing to Adam Candon, but Matheson believes its time for his political comeback.

The mayoral candidate describes himself as a champion of the working person, and he believes the current council has not been keeping the community’s best interest in mind.


READ MORE:
Kingston councillors pass motion to review transparency issues for closed meetings

Matheson says the current council bungled the purchase of the Cataraqui West Open Space Lands — protected wetlands that can never be developed — with money spent that could have been better allocated. The mayoral candidate would also change Kingston’s annual tax rate, saying Paterson’s 2.5 per cent increases are also not sustainable.

Watch the full interview below:






Bryan Paterson

Incumbent mayor Bryan Paterson has served one term as mayor and hopes to serve at least one more. He says he wants to build on the momentum of growth started by the current council while promising to keep annual property tax hikes at or below 2.5 percent.


READ MORE:
Mayor Bryan Paterson announces he will run again

Paterson listed the third crossing, the airport expansion and the improvements on Breakwater Park as accomplishments solidified while he was in office.

Paterson says he wants a chance to build more housing and to address the city’s low vacancy rate by pushing for more developments.


READ MORE:
Potential leak of closed-meeting details has some Kingston councillors concerned

Paterson responded to criticism about how he and his council closed the deal with Homestead Land Holdings Ltd. to build two high rises — 19- and 23-storey buildings — on Queen Street. The approval of that deal was done behind closed doors and later voted on in public, a process some have criticized for its alleged lack of transparency.

Paterson defended the negotiations, arguing that some things needed to be done behind closed doors in order not to tip off Homestead of the city’s plans.

Watch the full interview below:






Vicki Schmolka

As a former city councillor, Vicki Schmolka represented the Trillium District from 2006 to 2010, and she believes city hall has lost its way and needs to get back to basics, like fixing roads and sidewalks. Schmolka was chair of planning committee for four years, and she believes the current council has been disrespecting residents who tried to get involved in the planning process of certain developments.


READ MORE:
Kingston reaches deal with developer for two downtown high-rise apartments

Schmolka has also been a critic of the recent deal city hall made with Homestead Landholdings to build two high-rises on Queen Street, finally approved at 19 storeys and 23 storeys. Schmolka believes projects like these don’t follow the city’s official plan, and if she were mayor, she would opt for more residential development in the downtown core, but with buildings six- to eight-storeys high at the maximum.

Watch the full interview below:






© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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The Healthyish Newsletter: Let’s Talk About Sobriety | Healthyish

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Every week, Healthyish editor Amanda Shapiro talks about what she’s seeing, eating, watching, and reading in the wellness world and beyond. Pro tip: If you sign up for the newsletter, you’ll get the scoop before everyone else.

Healthyish readers,

We ran a story last week about a dinner hosted by five much-lauded chefs, all of whom are sober, and all of whom are men. I’m grateful to Julia Bainbridge for writing this story and proud of how it came out. It’s a story about a dinner, but it’s also about how alcohol and substance abuse has compounded an already toxic culture of masculinity in the restaurant industry.

We got some really nice feedback on the post, particularly from people in the industry who’ve dealt with addiction themselves or among their coworkers. And we got some criticism too. People wanted to know why, if we were referring to #metoo, the story didn’t include quotes from women who’d gotten sober. And they asked why the dinner, which Portland chef Gabe Rucker organized, didn’t include any women on the bill.

I think these are important questions to ask, and I want to respond to them from my own perspective (and with Julia’s blessing).

In the post, Julia writes, « the food industry is having its own reckoning, and drinking is a big part of that conversation. »

What could’ve been said more plainly is that alcohol takes the negative power dynamics that already exist in a lot of kitchens and makes them worse. Men who abuse power will likely do so even more blatantly and dangerously when alcohol is involved. We need to have more conversations about what happens when men in kitchens drink, and what happens when they choose to stop. And in this piece, we certainly could’ve acknowledged that women also deal with substance issues (As Julia wrote in an earlier draft, « Addiction certainly doesn’t discriminate; Zimmern calls it ‘an equal opportunity destroyer' »). But ultimately we focused this story on men because that’s where the root of the #metoo problem lies.

As for the second question—where were the women chefs at the dinner?—here’s a line from an early draft of the piece, where Julia asks this exact question:

Is there something to take from the fact that they’re all men? « The only thing that it says is that I couldn’t think of any women I knew who were prominent chefs and [publicly] in recovery, » explains Rucker. « I would love to have some women come forward be part of this if it goes well and we do it next year. »

I cut this line for the same reason I mentioned above: I wanted the piece to grapple with the connection between men drinking in kitchens and men abusing people in kitchens. In hindsight, I should’ve kept it in.

Do I think that the organizers of this event could’ve done more to find a woman to join their ranks for this dinner? Definitely. But the attention it would’ve generated for those women might’ve come with a cost. Stigmas around addiction still plague women much more than men. As one Instagram commenter wrote, « We are definitely out there! Most colleagues, myself included, choose to be more discreet about our lifestyle choices. If I felt men and women were judged on a level playing field, it would be different. »

Rucker couldn’t think of a prominent female chef who is publicly in recovery. Those women almost certainly exist, but it’s not up to him or us or anyone else to out them.

Until next week,

Amanda Shapiro
Healthyish Editor

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