Ottawa to get new LRT handover date on Thursday after RTG gets extension – Ottawa

[ad_1]

The consortium building Ottawa’s Confederation Line is expected to give the city a new date on Thursday for when it will hand over the delayed light rail transit line, after requesting an extension to come up with the new completion date.

The Rideau Transit Group (RTG) was supposed to provide the City of Ottawa with a new handover date for the $2.1-billion LRT line on Wednesday, Jan. 2, after blowing past two deadlines in 2018.


READ MORE:
No new deadline for Ottawa’s LRT in latest update from city

In a statement attributed to Michael Morgan, the city’s rail construction program director, the city said it granted the consortium a one-day extension.

“City staff will review the new date and respond to RTG. Staff will provide an update to Council following the review of the new RSA date,” the statement said.

Mayor Jim Watson and Transportation Manager John Manconi said in the fall that the Confederation Line will be in service by Mar. 31, 2019.

Once RTG hands the city the keys to the rail line, the municipality will need seven to 10 days to get the east-west Confederation train “into launch mode,” Manconi said in November.


READ MORE:
Launch of Ottawa’s LRT delayed until 2019

The original target date for the LRT’s completion was May 24, 2018. The city allowed the consortium to push that deadline to Nov. 2 without penalty.

Then, late last summer, RTG advised the city it wouldn’t make the November deadline, either. The city has penalized the consortium $1 million for the delay and said it would fine RTG another $1 million should it miss a third deadline.

In September, Watson said the city is prioritizing the safety of the 13-stop LRT system over meeting “a predetermined date in the calendar.”

WATCH: Sneak peek of the Ottawa LRT





The city is expected to report its recommendations for the winning bidders for Stage 2 of LRT — which will involve extensions to both the Confederation and Trillium lines — early this year.

In a year-end interview with Global News, Watson said in December the city hopes to have shovels in the ground for Stage 2 by the end of 2019.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

At least 16 pedestrians were hit on Toronto streets Thursday evening

[ad_1]

At least 16 pedestrians were hit in a series of collisions on Toronto streets Thursday that sent at least one man in his 80s to a trauma centre with life-threatening injuries.

That collision, which happened in Etobicoke, near Kipling Ave. and Annabelle Dr., was the most serious injury of the night, Toronto police Sgt. Brett Moore said. The victim was struck by a car shortly before 8:40 p.m.

Pedestrians walk in the rain along Front St. in a file photo. At least 16 pedestrians were struck by vehicles in the city Thursday. November is often one of the worst months for traffic collisions in the city, and the evening commute is expected to get darker after clocks go back one hour on Sunday.
Pedestrians walk in the rain along Front St. in a file photo. At least 16 pedestrians were struck by vehicles in the city Thursday. November is often one of the worst months for traffic collisions in the city, and the evening commute is expected to get darker after clocks go back one hour on Sunday.  (Steve Russell / Toronto Star)

Thursday night saw heavy rain and challenging road conditions in the city.

In a separate collision, a passenger died after the taxi she was in struck several other vehicles, including a TTC bus, near Avenue Rd. and Lawrence Ave. shortly after 5 p.m. The victim, a woman believed to be in her 40s, was rushed to hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

An hour later, a 45-year-old woman was struck by a car in the same area and transported to a trauma centre. She suffered an injury to her leg and complained of chest pains, police said.

Twenty minutes later, at 6:30 p.m., paramedics transported a woman in her 30s to a trauma centre in serious condition after she was struck by a car near Danforth Ave. and Main St.

Pedestrian accidents tend to go up this time of year due to a number of factors, Moore said, particularly early darkness and inclement weather, both of which bring poor visibility for drivers and pedestrians.

“Being seen is critical,” Sgt. Moore said. “For drivers, get those headlights on early, and for pedestrians, make sure that you’re seen when crossing the road.”

The evening commute will get even darker next week as clocks go back one hour Sunday night.

Toronto Paramedics Services spokesperson Kim McKinnon said paramedics see more calls for pedestrian accidents this time of year.

November is often one of the worst months for traffic collisions in the city.

From 2007 to 2017, 46 pedestrians and cyclists were killed on Toronto streets in the month of November — the highest total for any month over that period, according to police data.

In rainy weather and darkness, pedestrians shouldn’t assume they have been seen, should make eye contact with the driver and always cross at designated intersections, McKinnon and Moore said.

Drivers should also ensure they are paying full attention to the road and avoid distracting conversations with passengers, fiddling with the radio and looking at their phone, he said.

When weather and road conditions are bad, drivers should also stay well under the speed limit, Moore added.

This is basic advice, Moore said, but police “know a lot of these basic safety tips we’re mentioning do lead to safer roads and safer driving behaviour.”

In a Friday news release, the city said it has launched a road-safety campaign to coincide with the time change. The education campaign, which uses striking stories and images based on fatal collisions, is tied to the city’s Vision Zero plan aimed at eliminating traffic fatalities.

“Especially at this time of year, drivers need to be extra cautious,” said Barbara Gray, general manager of Transportation Services.

Thirty-three pedestrians and five cyclists have been killed on Toronto streets so far this year, according to figures compiled by the Star.

The most recent fatal collision involving a pedestrian happened on Oct. 18, when a 90-year-old man was hit by a BMW driver while crossing Ossington Ave. on a mobility scooter.

The man died in hospital on Monday.

The combined total of 38 cyclist and pedestrian deaths this year is the highest by this date in any year since 2007, the earliest available data.

The Star’s traffic fatality numbers are higher than the official police count. That’s in part because Toronto police figures don’t include deadly collisions that happen on private property, such as in the parking lots of apartment buildings or malls, or on provincial 400-series highways within Toronto.

Bianca Bharti is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @biancabharti

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Alek Minassian, the suspect in the Yonge St. van attack, scheduled to appear in court Thursday

[ad_1]

Alek Minassian is expected to appear in a north Toronto court in person Thursday for the first time since May, shortly after his arrest for the Yonge St. van ramming attack that killed 10 people and injured 16 others.

At his last appearance in September, by video link from jail, the Crown said it was asking the attorney general to waive Minassian’s preliminary hearing and proceed by direct indictment to Ontario Superior Court.

Van attack suspect Alek Minassian, seen here in a photograph from his LinkedIn page. Eight of the victims of the attack were women, ranging from a 22-year-old student to a 94-year-old retiree.
Van attack suspect Alek Minassian, seen here in a photograph from his LinkedIn page. Eight of the victims of the attack were women, ranging from a 22-year-old student to a 94-year-old retiree.  (LinkedIn)

The 25-year-old faces 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder for allegedly driving a rented cargo van along a busy stretch of Yonge St., between Sheppard and Finch Aves., mid-afternoon on April 23.

Eight of the victims were women, ranging from a 22-year-old student to a 94-year-old retiree.

Since his arrest, Minassian has been cited as an example of a man accused of a high-profile who had used the internet to connect with other like-minded individuals.

Before the massacre, Minassian’s Facebook account posted a cryptic comment about an “incel rebellion.” The term incel, short for “involuntarily celibate,” is used online to refer to men who lack sex with women.

Minassian, who is from Richmond Hill, turns 26 on Saturday.

Betsy Powell is a Toronto-based reporter covering crime and courts. Follow her on Twitter: @powellbetsy

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Mayoral candidate Jennifer Keesmaat takes your questions on Thursday

[ad_1]

She was Toronto’s chief planner for five years, known for being outspoken on what she felt was best for the city. Now, Jennifer Keesmaat is taking on John Tory to be mayor. Is she ready to serve as a politician instead of a bureaucrat?

Ask her yourself. Keesmaat will meet with the Toronto Star’s editorial board Thursday, Oct. 11 at 10 a.m., and we will livestream the conversation. She’ll answer questions from the editorial board, as well as our readers.

During municipal elections, the Star’s editorial board meets with mayoral candidates to find out where they stand on the issues most important to Torontonians. It helps the Star determine who, if anyone, it will endorse.

Email us your questions at electionquestions@thestar.ca or post them to us on Facebook or Twitter. Then tune in live at thestar.com at 10 a.m. Thursday to watch the discussion.

You’ll have a chance to join us again when John Tory meets the editorial board on Oct. 16 at 1 p.m.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس